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Old 09-29-2017, 05:01 PM   #1
Justme44
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In a quandary

I put 4 new tires on the 2000 Montana 3280 and weighed at a CAT scale. The weight was 10750. Not bad. I started back home, pulled into a Walmart for the night. I did a test of the torque for all wheels and was good. I then tested the pressure. All tires were in range of 79-81 psi. It was warm out ... about 68 degrees. Got up next morning with the temp outside of about 26 degrees. These are new tires so I wanted to make sure all was good ... like a valve leak. GADS .. psi ranged from 65-68. Now what do I do. Air in my pickup was about 62 psi when I keep 70 psi normally. Soooo ... with no air available, I decided to run at a low speed (45) for awhile. I watched the pressure on the pickup tires. The pressure started to go up ... very slowly. When the psi hit 66 psi I went to my normal speed of 60mph. Did I do the right thing? What would you have done? Thanks ... Dennis
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Old 09-29-2017, 05:11 PM   #2
CaptnJohn
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I would have found a 110 outlet to stretch 150' of extension cord as close as possible to power up the compressor. Wally auto may let you plug in for a few minutes. Even the maintenance lady at a road side rest let me connect once (only carried 50' then, she lent me 25' more).
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:17 PM   #3
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I would have run for a bit to heat up the tires and then check air. I have a 2000w inverter hardwired in our truck, and that makes it easy to run the 110 compressor I carry in the fiver, if I need to add air.
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:27 PM   #4
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What would I have done? Drive and not worry. Tire pressure increases and decreases with air temperature. If it had been 90 degrees the pressure would have been way up, no problem.
Lynwood
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:29 PM   #5
CaptnJohn
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Originally Posted by 1retired06 View Post
I would have run for a bit to heat up the tires and then check air. I have a 2000w inverter hardwired in our truck, and that makes it easy to run the 110 compressor I carry in the fiver, if I need to add air.
There are 2 110 outlets in my F350. Only used them to charge cell phones and laptops. Neighbor has one outlet in his GMC. After hurricane Matthew we had no power and popped it trying to make coffee. May look at just how heavy those outlets are. The compressor is probably going to draw too much at 15 amps...
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:30 PM   #6
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You would be good to run a short distance to find air with the pressure you had although having your own compressor is helpful. You generally see a long line at the tire shop for air when the temp first gets low. When I used to offroad with my Jeep, I would deflate tires to 6-8 PSI then use my compressor to air up before hitting the blacktop.
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:45 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by AZ Traveler View Post
You would be good to run a short distance to find air with the pressure you had although having your own compressor is helpful. You generally see a long line at the tire shop for air when the temp first gets low. When I used to offroad with my Jeep, I would deflate tires to 6-8 PSI then use my compressor to air up before hitting the blacktop.
Have not found a coin operated tire fill post yet that goes over 60#. Most tire dealers do not go to 110 either for fear of blowing lines. A dealer near me has 1 that is only used for truck/trailer tires over 80# and it will quickly fill 120++.
I carry a 150 psi compressor that runs on 110 as the 12 volt compressors either get hot or struggle forever to get to 110. It is a 1 1/2 gallon at $140 on Amazon and paid $87 at Farm and Fleet no tax free shipping.
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:11 PM   #8
1retired06
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There are 2 110 outlets in my F350. Only used them to charge cell phones and laptops. Neighbor has one outlet in his GMC. After hurricane Matthew we had no power and popped it trying to make coffee. May look at just how heavy those outlets are. The compressor is probably going to draw too much at 15 amps...
No, not talking about those. As I said, I have a 2000w inverter hardwired to my truck batteries. Bought at Tractor Supply. I plug into the inverter, not the truck. I use it all the time for my air compressor, battery charger, buffer when waxing the fiver, gives me all the power I need.
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Old 09-30-2017, 04:47 AM   #9
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It is very possible your tire pressures are reading as they should. If you filled them when the outside air temp was 68 and the tires had not been driven on for at lease several hours then when you checked the pressure when it was 26 outside they would read much lower but would rise as you drive.
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Old 09-30-2017, 10:44 AM   #10
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MLH and beeje hit the nail on the head. Tire pressure varies with the ambient air temperature. I filled my tires to 100 psi on a day it was 46 degrees. A few days later it was -1. I had set the TPMS minimum to 85 psi and it set off a warning. The tires were 83 to 85 psi. Once on the road the pressure climbed back up. Once I arrived in FL and the temps in the 60s the cold air pressure was in the 104 psi range.
Also check out the VIAIR 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor. A small kit that fits in the truck tool box and will quickly fill your tires to 100 + psi.
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Old 09-30-2017, 04:42 PM   #11
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I carry a small porter cable compressor with a max pressure of 150#s. You will need a compressor that has a max pressure of 150#s or so to put in 110#s in if you have G rated tires. You need to have 120 volts to power it, but that is usually not an issue before you leave a campground of on the road with a generator. You can buy these compressors at home depot for around $100 or so. Well worth the $ for having the ability to air up anytime/anywhere.
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Old 09-30-2017, 07:14 PM   #12
Justme44
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Thank you ... The information is very useful ...Thanks again.
Dennis
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Old 09-30-2017, 09:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Former StClairSailor View Post
MLH and beeje hit the nail on the head. Tire pressure varies with the ambient air temperature. I filled my tires to 100 psi on a day it was 46 degrees. A few days later it was -1. I had set the TPMS minimum to 85 psi and it set off a warning. The tires were 83 to 85 psi. Once on the road the pressure climbed back up. Once I arrived in FL and the temps in the 60s the cold air pressure was in the 104 psi range.
Also check out the VIAIR 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor. A small kit that fits in the truck tool box and will quickly fill your tires to 100 + psi.

A little off topic but does anyone use a VIAIR 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor to winterize by blowing air through the lines? Can it put out enough volume to do the job?
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Old 10-01-2017, 06:07 AM   #14
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From my experience with others that have done the blow out method, there is no way to ensure that all the water is out. Many I know have found broken lines and pumps in the spring. I would not think any electric type compressor had the volume of air needed to blow out lines.

I have winterized with the port in the conveyance center, but to me its kind of a pita.

As with all my previous campers, now I simply put 3-4 gallons of rv antifreeze in the fresh tank and run it through the pump and out all faucets until I see pink. Works every time and is all but guarantied to prevent issues with freezing.

Simply flush the tank and lines in the spring several times with some bleach added and they are sanitized at the same time.

One hint I have is to know how your water tank is designed (by dropping the undercover to have a look) like on my unit the low point of the tank is on the drivers side and it works better if that side is lower to ensure the antifreeze is pooling around the low point instead of the center of the tank where the pump can not pick it up. Since my unit has level up its easy to raise the passenger side to accomplish this.
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Old 10-01-2017, 07:19 AM   #15
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I know it works on tires. Saw it at the Rally. I ordered one on Amazon. It arrives Wednesday. I will try it on the lines and let you know. If it doesn't, I still have my pancake backup.


Quote:
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A little off topic but does anyone use a VIAIR 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor to winterize by blowing air through the lines? Can it put out enough volume to do the job?
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Old 10-01-2017, 09:28 AM   #16
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We also have the PC compressor and it works very well to bring the Saliuns up to 110 PSI. Also use it to blow out the lines when winterizing. Important to set the pressure regulator to no more than 30-35 lbs. Also, need to make sure all lines are opened until air comes through, including the bathroom stool and washer hookup. Never had a problem thru 4 winters but we don't get much below 20 degrees here in AZ.
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Old 10-01-2017, 06:24 PM   #17
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Well Beau2010. That could be the difference. I am in central Maryland and we have seen low temps below 0 many times. 10,s and teens are quite common. I personally would not take the chance blowing out as opposed to antifreeze here. My brother in-law who lives 2 miles from me used to blow until he had issues in the spring with leaks from frozen lines and pumps.
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