Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×
 

Go Back   Montana Owners Club - Keystone Montana 5th Wheel Forum > GENERAL DISCUSSIONS > Sitting around the Campfire
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-18-2022, 01:25 PM   #21
CaptnJohn
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: South East NC
Posts: 1,768
M.O.C. #19865
Born in 1948 and times were better then. Mom’s didn’t have to work, they didn’t worry when there 15 year old was driving or out after dark. Every boy always had a knife in his pocket and we had guns in the school lot during hunting seasons. We even took guns to school to make gun stocks. Vehicle manuals explained how to adjust a carburetor, now they tell you not to drink gasoline. Everything has been dumbed down for dummies which there is a huge percentage of now. 2 years in Nam but no complaints. I’m glad I’m not starting out now- how many youngsters today will be able to retire at age 55 comfortably? Anyone that thinks life is better now has no clue how good it was.
 
__________________
John & Patty
2022 3855 BR
2019 Lariat F350 4X4 Dually
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 01:47 PM   #22
steiny93
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: fargo
Posts: 157
M.O.C. #17461
I wish I was born today!

My kid and the ones she spends time will are stellar young adults, they are all headed to post high school educational programs (both trade and college bound) chasing a boat load of forwardly mobile careers.

Sign me up for modern goodness like fuel injection, variable valve timing, electric vehicles, internet and all the wins of modern medicine.

I love having an awesome career that lets me travel the world and work at the same time (I could retire today if I didn't love what I do, I'm not 50). None of that was possible in 1950.

If I could I'd be born again today.
steiny93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 02:00 PM   #23
HalH
New Member
 
HalH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Lexington
Posts: 7
M.O.C. #26651
Hello Sunshine!

I understand where you're coming from but my personal view is the current malaise in our younger population, as well as societal conflicts, are cyclical. Our society has become too advanced, too soft and too entitled but there will come a day when life kicks them in the teeth.

There will be challenges ahead, just as there are plenty of challenges behind us.
If the generations coming up don't gain the skills to achieve and excel, their standards of living will suffer. Once they get to the point of subsistence living they will either pull themselves up by the bootstraps or get a shopping cart and find a street corner. I'm betting the vast majority of them figure out a way to make it work.

I also pray regularly that they do!
HalH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 02:07 PM   #24
CaptnJohn
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: South East NC
Posts: 1,768
M.O.C. #19865
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalH View Post
I understand where you're coming from but my personal view is the current malaise in our younger population, as well as societal conflicts, are cyclical. Our society has become too advanced, too soft and too entitled but there will come a day when life kicks them in the teeth.

There will be challenges ahead, just as there are plenty of challenges behind us.
If the generations coming up don't gain the skills to achieve and excel, their standards of living will suffer. Once they get to the point of subsistence living they will either pull themselves up by the bootstraps or get a shopping cart and find a street corner. I'm betting the vast majority of them figure out a way to make it work.

I also pray regularly that they do!
I also pray they do but have far less faith they will, the majority will but a huge minority will never even know how to work a screw driver. Peer pressure in the past was about hitting a bulls eye, today it's drugs. It is often said here "if you are not handy don't buy an RV", so Goshen best be looking for another industry as RVs go the way of the rotary phone.
__________________
John & Patty
2022 3855 BR
2019 Lariat F350 4X4 Dually
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 02:08 PM   #25
steiny93
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: fargo
Posts: 157
M.O.C. #17461
I think the difference of perspective is this part:

Quote:
Originally Posted by HalH View Post
If the generations coming up don't gain the skills to achieve and excel, their standards of living will suffer.
From my perspective in today's world the above has nothing todo with subsistence living.

Knowing how to write code, knowing how to interact via digital communications, knowing how operate within a trade, those are valuable in today's world.

At the end of the day:
The skills needed today are definitely not the skills needed in 1950; trying to be successful today with 70 year old skills isn't going to work.


I personally wouldn't want to be back in 1950, not enough options for me.
steiny93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 02:26 PM   #26
mlh
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Salem
Posts: 6,666
M.O.C. #2283
The young people I know personally, not the ones I see on the 6 o’clock news are very fine young people. I’m proud to know them. The young lady I see at the post office owned her own home at 25. The young man that owns a home close has his own plumbing business. A friend’s son is a doctor, graduating top in college and doctor’s college. This is just a few. Yea I’m proud to know them.
Lynwood
__________________
www.harrellsprec.com
Lynwood Harrell
323 RL HC 2008 F250
mlh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 02:39 PM   #27
CaptnJohn
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: South East NC
Posts: 1,768
M.O.C. #19865
Quote:
Originally Posted by steiny93 View Post
I think the difference of perspective is this part:



From my perspective in today's world the above has nothing todo with subsistence living.

Knowing how to write code, knowing how to interact via digital communications, knowing how operate within a trade, those are valuable in today's world.

At the end of the day:
The skills needed today are definitely not the skills needed in 1950; trying to be successful today with 70 year old skills isn't going to work.


I personally wouldn't want to be back in 1950, not enough options for me.
Just a sample during the past 4 months ~~ all 3 have advanced degrees;

I get a call from down the road at midnight, leaking toilet. Not leaking but running. Explained it was the flapper and to shut the water off and get another at any hardware next day. He determined jamming a butter knife against the flapper was the way to shut off the water. Plumber bill over $100 for a $2 flapper

My daughter's friends buy a home and soon the garbage disposal not working plus they want a new ceiling fan and light kit in the bedroom. After opening the boxes they call an electrician.

A mobile tech I know well said you would not believe how the silly 10 minute repairs are loading my bank account at $85 service call and minimum of 1 hour at $80.

High schools did away with courses like wood shop, metal working, sad. If the grocery store go empty or the banks close for an extended time, or the electrical grid is hacked ~~ many are in deep do do and if no water they can wipe with that degree. Did the same with my grandsons. I taught both of my daughters how to use tools, grow food, hunt, fish and paid for their degrees. No matter what comes they will survive, writing code would not help.
__________________
John & Patty
2022 3855 BR
2019 Lariat F350 4X4 Dually
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 03:03 PM   #28
steiny93
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: fargo
Posts: 157
M.O.C. #17461
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptnJohn View Post
No matter what comes they will survive, writing code would not help.
What if continued progress is what comes? Writing code will buy as many toilets as you want.
steiny93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 04:55 PM   #29
gordo
Seasoned Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Caldwell
Posts: 51
M.O.C. #21136
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieselguy View Post
This may come off as a doom and gloom perspective on life, but I deal in the facts as they come at me each and every day and tend not to sit around with my head stuck in the sand. I am soooo glad I was born in the 50's and am not currently say 18 years old with a lifetime ahead of me. Can you fathom what the world has in store for you at that age??? I've always been a hands-on guy that seldom relies on some company to repair my everyday woes, chase down a code that simply requires a sensor change on my vehicle, or construct a new pole barn on my property. Those of you that live the opposite of this (nothing wrong with different lifestyles) won't be as unnerved at my few following examples. We no longer have any lawnmower/small engine repair shops in my end of town where there used to be 2-3. The owners got old and couldn't find younger people even interested in buying the business despite a very steady customer base. My Pathway X2's circuit board died ... Winegard won't repair anything older than 5 years. Had to buy a new one. Several RV parks along our last trip would not rent to travelers if their unit was older than 10 years no matter how well kept it was. Most all local motorcycle dealers will not work on bikes over 10 years old ... you have to find a guy working out of his garage to touch any bike with carburetors here. Two cycle outboard/PWC mechanics are getting few and far between despite a ton of them still in use. And lightly touching on building codes ... a tree limb fell in a friend's backyard demolishing the yard shed and yanking the power lines out of the weather head on the house. Evergy replaced the power lines from the pole, but "per code" the contracted electrician cannot simply connect the new lines to the weather head on the house nor can the meter can right below the weather head be used as it is too close to the same window it has been next to for the past 50 years. This wiring job will cost thousands to get power back to the house. Yes, I understand new construction codes ... but there ought to be something lesser for a situation like I've laid out here. Our older population is generally not flush with cash. I truly think we have big troubles coming in say another 10 - 20 years and I'm glad that my remaining time above ground is not an entire lifetime that young kids are facing.
Sweet jumpin Heyseus, that is so on the money. Thank you.
My son, who I love very much, is visiting. I feel as though I am a bad dad, onaconna at 48, in as much as I love his help, I have to guide everything.
Pretty sure I failed as a dad, but trying to fix that now......
gordo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 05:20 PM   #30
Todd727
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Holly Springs
Posts: 155
M.O.C. #19394
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptnJohn View Post
Just a sample during the past 4 months ~~ all 3 have advanced degrees;

I get a call from down the road at midnight, leaking toilet. Not leaking but running. Explained it was the flapper and to shut the water off and get another at any hardware next day. He determined jamming a butter knife against the flapper was the way to shut off the water. Plumber bill over $100 for a $2 flapper

My daughter's friends buy a home and soon the garbage disposal not working plus they want a new ceiling fan and light kit in the bedroom. After opening the boxes they call an electrician.

A mobile tech I know well said you would not believe how the silly 10 minute repairs are loading my bank account at $85 service call and minimum of 1 hour at $80.

High schools did away with courses like wood shop, metal working, sad. If the grocery store go empty or the banks close for an extended time, or the electrical grid is hacked ~~ many are in deep do do and if no water they can wipe with that degree. Did the same with my grandsons. I taught both of my daughters how to use tools, grow food, hunt, fish and paid for their degrees. No matter what comes they will survive, writing code would not help.

Born in the 60's and I learned how to do all of those things from my Dad. How come yours didn't?


As far as the doom and gloom, while I often look around and feel the same way about the direction of things, I then quickly pivot to hearing my grandmother tell me how happy she was to have been born early in 20's and that she didn't believe things were going to be good in the future. I think there is a certain level of perspective needed from our generation. Final thought is, my kids' generation is the one that is going to have to deal with what they are asking for now. So be it, not my problem. They can listen or not.
__________________
2017 3950BR
Todd727 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 06:02 PM   #31
Sokcap48
Established Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Hurricane
Posts: 21
M.O.C. #27141
Am I glad I was born in the,40’s Sure. With good health I would still like to see 2050 and beyond, know it won’t happen but think it would be neat to see it. Every generation thinks theirs is the best, and that is a good thing. My Dad said the world was going to H in a hand basket. He was born in 1896. His father said the same thing, and his father before him. So the kids now days don’t know how to fix a faucet or toilet that is still ok they don’t have to, they can get someone to do it and they know how to do things I don’t know how to do or ever even imagined. The world is changing for sure, change with it or get left behind. My Granddaughter worked put herself through college and is a great young person as is her husband. I think the world will be just fine. Different but fine.
__________________
Paul & Patty Little-Double Lung Transplant Recipient 9-16
2018 MHC 305RL.
2014 RAM SB Mega cab-for the Beagle Person. ( Muffin )
Pullrite Super Slider
Sokcap48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 06:28 PM   #32
dieselguy
Montana Master
 
dieselguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Haysville
Posts: 4,082
M.O.C. #3085
Steiny93 … I’m glad you have debated us a bit here because I couldn’t have asked for a better example of today’s thinker and I’m not saying that in a bad way. Sure technology, job skills, and how jobs are performed will and have changed as the years roll by. What your generation and like minded individuals currently just don’t get is what all the programs, electronics, coding, and algorithms are wired to is basic mechanics and physics as has always been and always will be. When that ground floor skill set fades away and it is rapidly doing so … your world will be in trouble. I can think of many examples of advances in electronics that helped basic mechanics during my years in maintenance at Boeing, but I’ll just share this one tale. We had a couple of robotic high speed routers that machined the floor beams for the 737 aircraft. The spindles were liquid cooled and when failure occurred had to be sent back to the factory for rebuild due to special tooling involved. For the first few years of dealing with these robots when a spindle would need changing it took hours for a forklift driver to assist us in the changeout blocking a production aisle. All change out was done manually. Down the line a couple of younger electricians were hired who better understood the computer controls and how to poke in commands for the head to move overriding the master program. We shaved hours off the swap by being able to drive the head via its own programing to and from the spindle instead of hoisting a heavy spindle into locating pins with a forklift. The catch was someone mechanically minded had to think up and fabricate a sturdy cradle for the spindle to sit on inside the router booth so the machine could drive up to the spindle itself. Someone had to know enough of hydraulics/electrics and basic mechanics to disable or unhook what needed be to allow the electricians to work their “miracle”.

Beneath all the programs, logic, and coding there is generally something mechanical that all that is hooked to. When you loose enough people that truly understand that issue and the skill base that disappears with it … that’s when there’s going to be big troubles. There is a big difference between “parts changer mechanics” and skilled diagnostic mechanics and electricians. A code reader will tell you what sensor is out of its parameters on your car, but it only gives you a direction to look. It won’t tell you exactly how to fix what caused it each and every time. That’s where basic skills come in.

In your scenario, if maintenance cannot keep the toilet factory going ... you're going to have a lot of money from coding and no toilet to buy. Back to bending over a log. Ha!

Yes, years down the road I can see robot mechanics, but someone will have to build them until they can build themselves. When they start building themselves … yet another problem will be created.
dieselguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 07:00 PM   #33
BB_TX
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: McKinney
Posts: 6,418
M.O.C. #6433
Yeah, many things are more reliable now. And certainly more high tech. But few of us, no matter the age, can repair most of those things. There was a time when we could repair most everything for very little money. Or have it repaired for a small fraction of the cost of new. Not much was thrown away unless just totally ruined.

We didn’t have a lot, but didn’t miss it because we had never had it. We were simply happy with what we did have. Even in Texas we never had air conditioning until I as grown and gone. And gas space heaters were turned off before bedtime due to carbon monoxide concerns, even if temps were in the teens or single digits. Just used 1, 2, or 3 of granny’s quilts depending on how cold. TV had 4 B&W channels that signed off about 11:00 PM and signed back on around 6:00 AM. But we were usually outside playing anyway. With other kids. Face to face. Making up games.

And as kids we roamed the neighborhood from one friend’s house to another, even after dark without fear. There were disagreements, and occasional fights. But they walked away afterward, maybe never friends, but not revenge seeking enemies. No guns or knives. No gangs. And no drugs.

People disagreed on politics and religion. But not with the hatred of today. You expressed your opinion and moved on. And if your candidate lost you still respected the office and supported the country. College kids didn’t need time off from classes to mourn because their candidate lost. And, heaven forbid, if we ever get into another major war do your think the younger generation will rush out to help protect our country?

The internet is great in many respects. But social media has become one of the worst things ever invented. The division and hatred it constantly spreads does not bode well for our country’s future. I am glad I will not be around to see it that far. And I hate to think how the future will be for my grandkids about to move into their 20’s.
__________________
Bill & Patricia
BB_TX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 07:33 PM   #34
Mikendebbie
Montana Master
 
Mikendebbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,487
M.O.C. #21044
The internet changed everything. I was born dead center of the baby boom generation, and I had a wonderful childhood growing up. My kids came up in the 80s and 90s, and they had it much like I did…Saturday morning cartoons, church on Sunday, bicycles in the neighborhood, vacations to see the country with mom and dad in an RV…oh, and no internet…until they were in high school …more or less. What was My Space anyway? My middle son and wife (late 30s) finally decided to have a baby a couple of years ago, and DW and I are beyond happy to have a grandson because we had given up hope. Maybe they can teach him good and control what he sees online. It’s something I did not have to deal with. I suppose I should quit worrying about it.
__________________
MikenDebbie Aggie ‘77 in the sticks near Austin TX
2019 Chevy 3500 High Country DRW
2018 Montana 3921FB
Aussie Gus + Texas Heeler Jimmy
Mikendebbie is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 08:34 PM   #35
AZ Traveler
Site Team
 
AZ Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Oro Valley
Posts: 3,205
M.O.C. #20477
This discussion has gone on across many generations with much the same thoughts on the younger folks and how the world is going downhill.
__________________
Zack and Donna plus Millie and Ranger
2018 3160RL

"Life is too short to stay indoors, enjoy the ride!"
AZ Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2022, 09:41 PM   #36
bcrvman
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Qualicum Beach
Posts: 555
M.O.C. #26399
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieselguy View Post
This may come off as a doom and gloom perspective on life, but I deal in the facts as they come at me each and every day and tend not to sit around with my head stuck in the sand. I am soooo glad I was born in the 50's and am not currently say 18 years old with a lifetime ahead of me. Can you fathom what the world has in store for you at that age??? I've always been a hands-on guy that seldom relies on some company to repair my everyday woes, chase down a code that simply requires a sensor change on my vehicle, or construct a new pole barn on my property. Those of you that live the opposite of this (nothing wrong with different lifestyles) won't be as unnerved at my few following examples. We no longer have any lawnmower/small engine repair shops in my end of town where there used to be 2-3. The owners got old and couldn't find younger people even interested in buying the business despite a very steady customer base. My Pathway X2's circuit board died ... Winegard won't repair anything older than 5 years. Had to buy a new one. Several RV parks along our last trip would not rent to travelers if their unit was older than 10 years no matter how well kept it was. Most all local motorcycle dealers will not work on bikes over 10 years old ... you have to find a guy working out of his garage to touch any bike with carburetors here. Two cycle outboard/PWC mechanics are getting few and far between despite a ton of them still in use. And lightly touching on building codes ... a tree limb fell in a friend's backyard demolishing the yard shed and yanking the power lines out of the weather head on the house. Evergy replaced the power lines from the pole, but "per code" the contracted electrician cannot simply connect the new lines to the weather head on the house nor can the meter can right below the weather head be used as it is too close to the same window it has been next to for the past 50 years. This wiring job will cost thousands to get power back to the house. Yes, I understand new construction codes ... but there ought to be something lesser for a situation like I've laid out here. Our older population is generally not flush with cash. I truly think we have big troubles coming in say another 10 - 20 years and I'm glad that my remaining time above ground is not an entire lifetime that young kids are facing.
There are thos that are playing in the parade, those that watch the parade, and others who say 'what parade'. We are producing the latter now. God help our grandchildren .
__________________
2018 Keystone Montana 3811MS
2017 Ford F450 diesel dually
600AH Battle Born Lithium Batteries, 1,080 watts solar
3,000 watt hybrid inverter with 120A charger
bcrvman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2022, 01:03 AM   #37
Byron B
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Georgetown
Posts: 233
M.O.C. #18751
I was born in 1953 in Roswell NM. Yes, I have heard most/all of the alien jokes….
Father owned a sporting goods store in downtown. Hunting fishing and archery goods. Dad taught me his work ethic and how to think, figure things out and how to work with my hands. The bank president would bring his sack lunch and eat lunch with my Dad most days. Everyone knew everyone and other parents were not afraid to swat your bottom if you messed up and your parents knew about it before you could get home. Not enough kids growing up in that atmosphere anymore.
Byron B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2022, 11:15 AM   #38
twindman
Montana Master
 
twindman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Mesa az
Posts: 2,409
M.O.C. #5651
I was born in 1946 - so an early boomer. I have worked as a programmer for 36 years and retired for 16 now. I didn't particularly like it, but Dad made me take 4 years of Ag (farm kid). That REALLY gave me a good background in things that are still useful. I built walls in the basement of one house and dry walled, etc. Did the electrical wiring for outlets and lights. Know a little about gas engines and a lot about agriculture (tho it is vastly different now).

So I have been in both worlds of basic useful training and high tech. My daughter married a guy in the army now 20 years. When first married, he had a Saturn, I think. It had something like 30,000 miles on it and he had never had the oil changed!!!!! She now takes care of stuff like than and much more - she took shop in 8th grade for an elective and that has taught here about hammer and saw stuff. I don't think many kids today get that background. Oh well...............
__________________

Tom and Gail
2013 Mountaineer 362
2012 Silverado 2500
twindman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2022, 12:21 PM   #39
CaptnJohn
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: South East NC
Posts: 1,768
M.O.C. #19865
Congrats on 16 years retired! I was born in’48 and retired 19 years! Retirement is a hell of a job but I’m getting good at it. Household projects, lots of range time and travel 6-8 months a year.
__________________
John & Patty
2022 3855 BR
2019 Lariat F350 4X4 Dually
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2022, 03:17 PM   #40
Cat320
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location:
Posts: 1,546
M.O.C. #5751
I was raised in the 50s, my Dad was a WW II Marine. I know he and my Mother would be rolling over in their graves if they knew what shape our country is in or the way the young people of today act.
Cat320 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Montana RV, Keystone RV Company or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.