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Old 08-02-2020, 12:57 PM   #61
beeje
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I do not think much of this banter really matters since the vast majority of us are going to age out the tires before we wear them out. The trucks and or campers certainly could care less about the rolling resistance.
I think the only issue would be if someone's axles were way out of alignment causing tire wear at an alarming rate
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Old 08-02-2020, 01:39 PM   #62
mlh
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Originally Posted by Montana Man View Post
If full pressure isn't needed to carry a maximum weight, the only reasons I can think of to run them at max pressure is for less rolling resistance and cooler running tires.

That sounds like a great reason to run max pressure.
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Old 08-02-2020, 01:50 PM   #63
CalandLinda
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Originally Posted by PSFORD99 View Post
Many of us are running other size tires ,and weight ratings on our fifth wheels. All of my fifth wheels have had ST235/80/16's either E rated or Grated, and I have upgraded to ST235/85 /16's G rated . Although I don't run max inflation, nor follow a weight chart . I run my G rated tires as said before @ 95-100, and have done so without issues for many years.
When tires of the same designated size are used as replacements with a higher load range letter, it is not a tire size change, just a load capacity increase making the increase in load capacity optional above the cold inflation pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.

When a designated tire size differs (ST235/80R16 replaced with ST235/85R16) the 85 is a “plus sized” tire. Tire industry standards for using plus sized tires can be found in numerous PDF files. Basically the new cold inflation pressures are set from the load capacity the OE tires provided on the vehicle certification label. Replacement tires MUST provide a load capacity equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided – via inflation.

The use of a supplemental tire sticker for plus sized tires is authorized by NHTSA and highly recommended. Here is a picture of one. In place of load index the load range letter is used for ST or LT tires.

Placard_Label_348[1].jpg
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Old 08-02-2020, 02:02 PM   #64
CalandLinda
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Originally Posted by McRod View Post
Here is some more scrub.

Attached is the MRT Sailun tire inflation chart. You may notice the S637T size is curiously absent. This chart applies to commercial tires (typically noted by the half sizes) which is what Sailun is known for.

Also attached the S637T specs sheet. It only notes 1 air pressure rating. 110 psi. This doesn't mean there isn't a load inflation chart for the S637T...just not on Sailuns website that I could find.

You can draw conclusions and apply commercial trucking procedures if you prefer I don't think it would hurt to run these tires a few pounds under the air pressure rating. Give it a try and make your own choices. Everything Tom is saying sounds right from a commercial trucking perspective. Others are quoting what RV manufacturers say, which also sounds right since they create "recreation" vehicles, which would not be good for sales if they told you it was a full time job to maintain them, rather than go with one pressure and enjoy the ride.
People that officially write about tire maintenance and standards (USTMA) cannot recommend less than what the governing body (DOT - NHTSA - FMVSS) has determined and published as minimum standards.

As consumers we are all responsible for maintaining a safe vehicle to travel in or tow. Tire forensic experts can easily diagnose a tire condition failure when caused by under inflation or over weight.
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Old 08-02-2020, 02:04 PM   #65
CalandLinda
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Originally Posted by McRod View Post
Here is some more scrub.

Attached is the MRT Sailun tire inflation chart. You may notice the S637T size is curiously absent. This chart applies to commercial tires (typically noted by the half sizes) which is what Sailun is known for.

Also attached the S637T specs sheet. It only notes 1 air pressure rating. 110 psi. This doesn't mean there isn't a load inflation chart for the S637T...just not on Sailuns website that I could find.

You can draw conclusions and apply commercial trucking procedures if you prefer I don't think it would hurt to run these tires a few pounds under the air pressure rating. Give it a try and make your own choices. Everything Tom is saying sounds right from a commercial trucking perspective. Others are quoting what RV manufacturers say, which also sounds right since they create "recreation" vehicles, which would not be good for sales if they told you it was a full time job to maintain them, rather than go with one pressure and enjoy the ride.
https://fifthwheelst.com/documents/C...T-Modified.pdf
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