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Old 07-26-2020, 06:41 AM   #41
mazboy
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getting back to your question, have you tried /www.stlouisrvservice.com?
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Old 07-26-2020, 09:12 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by RK & Jen View Post
I have a 2018 3790RD that has the left front tire wearing on the inside and outside which I believe is an alignment issue. I have contacted many of the large trailer maintenance companies in the St. Louis area but get the sorry can't help you. Any recommendation on who I could contact in the Elkhart, IN area that specializes in alignments. Thanks.

Ron

We have seen this type of wear on these G tires since people started using them. It was a big concern for a while until most people that had them realized that was the way these tires wore on a heavy fiver.
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Old 08-01-2020, 08:45 AM   #43
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I’m with PSFORD. He tried it, he knows it works. I know it works too. Again, these are NOT the nylon belted rags that you put on your passenger car or the E load rated ST tires. There is a reason why these G rated tires weigh more than twice as much as E rated. The construction is MUCH more heavy duty. They are built like a semi tire. They will wear completely different than an E rated or a passenger car tire. DO NOT compare the wear pattern on a G or higher rated tire to those generic wear charts. They DO NOT hold true with heavy duty tires. Heavy duty tires flex completely differently. I have done maintenance on semi trucks & trailers for 30+ years. This edge wear on these G rated tires is MOST DEFINITELY a result of over inflation for the weight that is being carried by the tire. Use the load/inflation table, then give yourself a 5% margin of error above what the table tells you for inflation pressures to allow for variables in load if you like. (I’m sure that the tire engineers that made the chart already gave some allowances for that.) I have seen this type of edge wear on LOTS of semi trailers that run empty or lightly loaded for a large percentage of their miles. When looking at the tread, you will see that the edges of the tread are “cleaner”, or more black than in the center. That is because the edges “scrub” more as the tire rotates because the tread surface is rounded like a basketball. That’s the nature of these tires because of their heavy duty construction. The heavy duty construction makes them stiffer. Thus, they don’t get as hot as an E rated tire. You all keep arguing against running lower pressures, but you all keep having the edge wear. Open your minds, admit that you could be wrong. Use the chart, lower your pressures & TRY IT, you might be surprised. Let the flaming begin, because I know it will.
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Old 08-01-2020, 12:42 PM   #44
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Is there a chart other than this? And, would it make sense to have to know the weight for each wheel to adjust pressure according to weight? Wouldn't that weight on each wheel change with varying load configurations of the trailer?
Inflating tires to the load carried is a commercial tire application (big rigs). One of the stipulations when doing so is to use an inflation pressure for the tire carrying the heaviest load and insure the others on that axle are all inflated to that value.

RV trailer tires are inflated in accordance with the vehicle manufacturers recommendations and the standards published by the USTMA.

It's very difficult to under inflate a RV trailer tire because the vehicle manufacturer almost always has recommended maximum inflation pressures for all Original Equipment Tires.

The USTMA standard states to "NEVER use inflation pressures below what has been recommended by the vehicle manufacturer."
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Old 08-01-2020, 12:52 PM   #45
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Rivering

Rivering :
https://advantage.michelintruck.com/...eer_letter.pdf
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Old 08-01-2020, 02:42 PM   #46
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Those are good diagrams & pics, but they don't apply to trailer tires. There is no steering wheels on a trailer. Trailer tires are subject to extreme lateral forces in sharp turns, known as scrubbing. On your next hard left turn, stick your head out your window and look at the contorted tires. It may look like they are going to pop off the rims! It's normal. It's what the OPs tire wear picture is demonstrating on the tire shoulders. Trailer tires should be kept at the maximum tire pressure, which is typically 110psi for these size rigs. It will help minimize scrubbing and keep the tires at a consistent temperature. There is no need to adjust tire pressure based on the different weights on each tire. Rotate the trailer tires regularly to help minimize scrubbing.
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Old 08-01-2020, 03:03 PM   #47
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Those are good diagrams & pics, but they don't apply to trailer tires. There is no steering wheels on a trailer. Trailer tires are subject to extreme lateral forces in sharp turns, known as scrubbing. On your next hard left turn, stick your head out your window and look at the contorted tires. It may look like they are going to pop off the rims! It's normal. It's what the OPs tire wear picture is demonstrating on the tire shoulders. Trailer tires should be kept at the maximum tire pressure, which is typically 110psi for these size rigs. It will help minimize scrubbing and keep the tires at a consistent temperature. There is no need to adjust tire pressure based on the different weights on each tire. Rotate the trailer tires regularly to help minimize scrubbing.
The description says "steer OR trailer tires"
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Old 08-01-2020, 09:05 PM   #48
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The description says "steer OR trailer tires"
Not trailer tires but trailer position.
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Old 08-01-2020, 09:24 PM   #49
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Not trailer tires but trailer position.
????? What are you trying to say?
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Old 08-01-2020, 09:44 PM   #50
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????? What are you trying to say?
You said trailer tire the chart doesn’t say trailer tire it says trailer position it is not referencing tires on a trailer but on a car truck etc and is referencing the trailing tire that is the free spinning Tires on a front wheel drive vehicle That trail the drive wheels.
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Old 08-02-2020, 09:02 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by CalandLinda View Post
Inflating tires to the load carried is a commercial tire application (big rigs). One of the stipulations when doing so is to use an inflation pressure for the tire carrying the heaviest load and insure the others on that axle are all inflated to that value.

RV trailer tires are inflated in accordance with the vehicle manufacturers recommendations and the standards published by the USTMA.

It's very difficult to under inflate a RV trailer tire because the vehicle manufacturer almost always has recommended maximum inflation pressures for all Original Equipment Tires.

The USTMA standard states to "NEVER use inflation pressures below what has been recommended by the vehicle manufacturer."
Many of us are running other size tires ,and weight ratings on our fifth wheels. All of my fifth wheels have had ST235/80/16's either E rated or Grated, and I have upgraded to ST235/85 /16's G rated . Although I don't run max inflation, nor follow a weight chart . I run my G rated tires as said before @ 95-100, and have done so without issues for many years.

I have no tire wear as shown by the OP. I reported earlier about the weight chart sent to me by Sailun, just a bit too low of pressures for my liking on the weights. I will stick to what has worked, I will never inflate my G rated tires to 110 psi. They are rated for 4400 lbs at that inflation. I have a long ways to go before I reach those weights on a tire. If ,and when I do then I will inflate to 110 psi.
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Old 08-02-2020, 09:11 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Tom N OH View Post
Iím with PSFORD. He tried it, he knows it works. I know it works too. Again, these are NOT the nylon belted rags that you put on your passenger car or the E load rated ST tires. There is a reason why these G rated tires weigh more than twice as much as E rated. The construction is MUCH more heavy duty. They are built like a semi tire. They will wear completely different than an E rated or a passenger car tire. DO NOT compare the wear pattern on a G or higher rated tire to those generic wear charts. They DO NOT hold true with heavy duty tires. Heavy duty tires flex completely differently. I have done maintenance on semi trucks & trailers for 30+ years. This edge wear on these G rated tires is MOST DEFINITELY a result of over inflation for the weight that is being carried by the tire. Use the load/inflation table, then give yourself a 5% margin of error above what the table tells you for inflation pressures to allow for variables in load if you like. (Iím sure that the tire engineers that made the chart already gave some allowances for that.) I have seen this type of edge wear on LOTS of semi trailers that run empty or lightly loaded for a large percentage of their miles. When looking at the tread, you will see that the edges of the tread are ďcleanerĒ, or more black than in the center. That is because the edges ďscrubĒ more as the tire rotates because the tread surface is rounded like a basketball. Thatís the nature of these tires because of their heavy duty construction. The heavy duty construction makes them stiffer. Thus, they donít get as hot as an E rated tire. You all keep arguing against running lower pressures, but you all keep having the edge wear. Open your minds, admit that you could be wrong. Use the chart, lower your pressures & TRY IT, you might be surprised. Let the flaming begin, because I know it will.
As said never had that kind of edge wear as described by the OP. IMO the tire engineers are a bit smarter then me, there is a reason for weigh charts .
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:39 AM   #53
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If full pressure isn't needed to carry a maximum weight, the only reasons I can think of to run them at max pressure is for less rolling resistance and cooler running tires.
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:49 AM   #54
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If full pressure isn't needed to carry a maximum weight, the only reasons I can think of to run them at max pressure is for less rolling resistance and cooler running tires.

Not sure what you mean , of course you want maximum inflation of you have maximum weight. I don't, and don't inflate to maximum inflation.

In my thinking rolling resistance is determined on how much weight on the tire, less weight ,less rolling resistance , so why the need for added inflation .
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:50 AM   #55
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Here is some more scrub.

Attached is the MRT Sailun tire inflation chart. You may notice the S637T size is curiously absent. This chart applies to commercial tires (typically noted by the half sizes) which is what Sailun is known for.

Also attached the S637T specs sheet. It only notes 1 air pressure rating. 110 psi. This doesn't mean there isn't a load inflation chart for the S637T...just not on Sailuns website that I could find.

You can draw conclusions and apply commercial trucking procedures if you prefer I don't think it would hurt to run these tires a few pounds under the air pressure rating. Give it a try and make your own choices. Everything Tom is saying sounds right from a commercial trucking perspective. Others are quoting what RV manufacturers say, which also sounds right since they create "recreation" vehicles, which would not be good for sales if they told you it was a full time job to maintain them, rather than go with one pressure and enjoy the ride.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Sailun_MRT_Load_Inflation_Table.pdf (543.0 KB, 5 views)
File Type: pdf 637T.pdf (232.2 KB, 6 views)
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Old 08-02-2020, 11:04 AM   #56
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Here is some more scrub.

Attached is the MRT Sailun tire inflation chart. You may notice the S637T size is curiously absent. This chart applies to commercial tires (typically noted by there half sizes) which is what Sailun is known for.

Also attached the S637T specs sheet. It only notes 1 air pressure rating. 110 psi. This doesn't mean there isn't a load inflation chart for the S637T...just not on Sailuns website that I could find.

You can draw conclusions and apply commercial trucking procedures if you prefer I don't think it would hurt to run these tires a few pounds under the air pressure rating. Give it a try and make your own choices. Everything Tom is saying sounds right from a commercial trucking perspective. Others are quoting what RV manufacturers say, which also sounds right since they create "recreation" vehicles, which would not be good for sales if they told you it was a full time job to maintain them, rather than go with one pressure and enjoy the ride.

I was sent an inflation chart from a Sailun rep. for the S637's . I edited this post ,I was incorrect on what I had written was not looking at the inflation chart correctly.
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Old 08-02-2020, 11:11 AM   #57
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Originally Posted by PSFORD99 View Post
Not sure what you mean , of course you want maximum inflation of you have maximum weight. I don't, and don't inflate to maximum inflation.

In my thinking rolling resistance is determined on how much weight on the tire, less weight ,less rolling resistance , so why the need for added inflation .
I think of it like riding a bicycle. Riding with fully inflated tires is easier than riding it with lower pressure. Same vehicle, same weight, different amounts of effort to propel it.
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Old 08-02-2020, 11:14 AM   #58
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SPECIAL ST METRIC TIRES FOR TRAILERS IN HIGHWAY SERVICE
TIRE AND RIM ASSOCIATION STANDARD
TIRE SIZE DESIGNATION TIRE LOAD LIMITS (lbs.) AT VARIOUS COLD INFLATION PRESSURES (psi)
USAGE 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110
80 SERIES
ST235/80R16 DUAL 1510 1690 1820 (B) 101 2000 2140 2270 (C) 109 2400 2510 2600 (D) 114 2760 2870 3000 (E) 119 3085 3195 3305 (F) 122 3415 3525 3640 (G) 125
SINGLE 1720 1920 2090 (B) 106 2270 2430 2600 (C) 114 2730 2870 3000 (D) 119 3140 3260 3420 (E) 123 3525 3640 3750 (F) 126 3860 3970 4080 (G) 129
85 SERIES
ST235/85R16 DUAL 1610 1800 1930 (B) 103 2120 2270 2400 (C) 111 2560 2690 2830 (D) 117 2950 3060 3200 (E) 121 3305 3415 3525 (F) 124 3640 3750 3860 (G) 127
SINGLE 1830 2040 2200 (B) 108 2400 2580 2760 (C) 116 2910 3060 3200 (D) 121 3360 3480 3640 (E) 125 3750 3860 3970 (F) 128 4080 4190 4400 (G) 132

2016 TIRE AND RIM ASSCOCIATION

Note: 1 Bold face loads in the above table are maximum for the tire size and load range shown. Numbers after the load range parentheses are international Load Index numbers.
2 Above inflation pressures are minimum for the loads shown.
3 For tires not marked with a Service Description, consult tire manufacturer for applications above 65 mph (105 km/h)
4 Sailun S637 is rated for 75 mph (120 km/h)

Consult trailer manufacturer specification for wheel and axle capacity.
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Old 08-02-2020, 11:28 AM   #59
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I think of it like riding a bicycle. Riding with fully inflated tires is easier than riding it with lower pressure. Same vehicle, same weight, different amounts of effort to propel it.
Wouldn't it still apply to how much weight was sitting on the seat , to how much it deflected the tire, to create resistance, wouldn't me weighing 100 pounds create less resistance ,then you weighting 150 lbs.. Maybe I'm haywire here
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Old 08-02-2020, 11:44 AM   #60
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Wouldn't it still apply to how much weight was sitting on the seat , to how much it deflected the tire, to create resistance, wouldn't me weighing 100 pounds create less resistance ,then you weighting 150 lbs.. Maybe I'm haywire here
Yes, I can see how increasing weight would increase rolling resistance if tire pressure remained the same. Raising the tire pressure for the extra weight would reduce rolling resistance. But, our weight (the trailer, and bicycle example) basically remains the same weight. So the higher the tire pressure, the less rolling resistance. The higher the pressure, the less flexing of the tire (cooler running) and less footprint of the tire touching the road (resistance).

I'm certainly no expert here. If I'm off base here someone please jump in.
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