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Minitrbo
03-09-2020, 10:19 AM
Weeks ago I had a tire blowout. I replaced all the OEM F rated tires with G rated Carlisle. Subsequently I installed a TPMS. The cold pressure in each tire is 110 psi as recommended for the load. When driving in 65 F weather at 65 mph I saw the pressure get as high as 135 psi.

A lot of forums say things like "I believe ..." and so on. I'm interested in finding out if anyone knows for a fact, such as a data sheet from a manufacturer, at what pressure I should become concerned. FWIW the maximum temperature reported by the TPMS is 90 F.

rohrmann
03-09-2020, 11:12 AM
The tires are designed to handle the pressure rise when driving. Just make sure you check pressure when the tires are cold, like in the morning prior to driving.

mlh
03-09-2020, 12:29 PM
You do NOT haft to worry about a pressure rise. The tires are designed to handle that. Inflate then to 100 to 110 and don’t worry.
Lynwood

Chasnracin
03-09-2020, 01:32 PM
As everyone has stated, they are rated for the increase in temp. That being said, if you have one that is increasing greatly, check out why. Possibly axle allignment, bearing heat, or maybe just under your heaviest slide causing it.

DQDick
03-09-2020, 02:36 PM
I would be concerned about 135. I had a couple of G 614's get that high once and one of them failed. I think it was a combination of a large change in both temperature and altitude at the same time. The tires were also 6 years old and I wouldn't let that happen again either.

Slow Hand
03-09-2020, 05:33 PM
Just wait for a 100 degree day then check LOL

timandsusan
03-10-2020, 08:02 AM
Yes, I would be concerned about 135 degrees on a 65 degree day. What was your speed? It is basic thermodynamics. Put 65 degree water in a pot and put it on the stove but do not turn on the stove. What will be the temperature in 1 hour?? It will be 65 Degrees. Now, turn the stove on to 100 degrees. What will be the water temperature in an hour?? 100 degrees MAXIMUM! It cannot boil! So how does the tire get to 135 degrees?? I would say that it is tire flexing causing the air temperature in the tire to increase. I think the 135 is a big issue. As an engineer--I did study thermodynamics! Either the temperature reading is in error-a possibility or the tires are defective.

Minitrbo
03-10-2020, 11:16 AM
As an engineer who has studied thermodynamics and chemistry, which perhaps is not all that important methinks, since like playing telephone in grade school we lost track of the thread. The original topic was concern about tire PRESSURE measured in pounds per square inch, not tire TEMPERATURE. The peak TEMPERATURE I observed was 90 F. It was the pressure reported of 135 PSI for which I was concerned. Speed: 65 mph maximum.

mlh
03-10-2020, 12:06 PM
As an engineer you should know pressure and temperature go hand in hand.
Lynwood

drjjj
03-10-2020, 03:23 PM
While traveling through AZ in 2018 my G614's all got to 135-138 with no ill effects. It was hot outside. I did notice that if I slowed from 65 to 60 that the temperature dropped 3-5 degrees. As other posters have said, I would be more concerned about one tire being significantly higher than the others on the TPMS.

mhs4771
03-10-2020, 03:29 PM
Question: Did you see this same increase in all four tires?? If only on one tire, I would be very worried.
To be honest I haven't heard good things about Carlisle Trailer tires, most are using either Goodyear or Sailun. But knowing nothing about Carlisle tires, the 25 pound increase might be normal.
I have run Goodyear 17.5 H's and now Sailun 17.5 H's and on a warm day will generally see a 25 pound increase from the set pressure of 125.

Slow Hand
03-11-2020, 04:21 PM
You don't think the engineers at Goodyear tested these tires to Way more heat and air pressures that are marked on the tires. Ever wonder why they say to check tire pressures when the tire is cold. I bet these tires could stand 200PSI before they fail. If you drive in the desert on a 130 degree day you ever wonder what the PSI's in the tire would get to.I bet these tires have been subject to higher temperatures than that. After all peoples lives are at stake

Code80
03-15-2020, 01:24 PM
I have been thinking about getting my 5th wheel tires filled with nitrogen. Nitrogen is not effected by temperature. One place wanted $15.00 per tire and that seemed reasonable.

Fish
03-15-2020, 01:32 PM
I have been thinking about getting my 5th wheel tires filled with nitrogen. Nitrogen is not effected by temperature. One place wanted $15.00 per tire and that seemed reasonable.

I think that's a huge racket. I had nitrogen in the tires on a truck I bought once, the tire pressure still went up and down.

Then you have to find nitrogen to add if you need it, not so easy to find sometimes.

phillyg
03-15-2020, 01:34 PM
Tire mfgrs state to set cold (not driven on) pressure. You don't have to worry about 135 degrees on all four tires. What you do have to be concerned with is if one tire is significantly higher than the other three, indicating a possible problem with that tire. Another possible tell-tale is if one axle's tires are hotter than the other, indicating that axle is carrying more weight for some reason.

Code80
03-15-2020, 01:37 PM
Had it in our car, no issues stayed the same summer and winter. I think it really depends on the people putting it in and if they evacuated the air correctly.

Carl n Susan
03-15-2020, 01:40 PM
I find that using a 78% Nitrogen mixture works very well.

BiggarView
03-15-2020, 02:04 PM
I find that using a 78% Nitrogen mixture works very well.

Yes indeed it does. LOL:bow:

twindman
03-15-2020, 03:00 PM
I find that using a 78% Nitrogen mixture works very well.
You sneaky guy!!:D

Rebel702
03-15-2020, 03:23 PM
You sneaky guy!!:D
Air is the Earth's atmosphere. Air around us is a mixture of many gases and dust particles. ... Air is a mixture of about 78% of nitrogen, 21% of oxygen, 0.9% of argon, 0.04% of carbon dioxide, and very small amounts of other gases. There is an average of about 1% water vapour.

How much do you pay for that? :rofl:

McRod
03-15-2020, 03:23 PM
My tire PSI's go up in that range. It's normal.

WARNING: I am not an ingineer. Just stayed in a RV last night.

mlh
03-15-2020, 06:31 PM
I find that using a 78% Nitrogen mixture works very well.

That is what I use and itís better than cheap, itís free.
Lynwood

Dixie Flyer
03-16-2020, 02:20 PM
Weeks ago I had a tire blowout. I replaced all the OEM F rated tires with G rated Carlisle. Subsequently I installed a TPMS. The cold pressure in each tire is 110 psi as recommended for the load. When driving in 65 F weather at 65 mph I saw the pressure get as high as 135 psi.

A lot of forums say things like "I believe ..." and so on. I'm interested in finding out if anyone knows for a fact, such as a data sheet from a manufacturer, at what pressure I should become concerned. FWIW the maximum temperature reported by the TPMS is 90 F.


Years ago I had a tire on the front of my car that that caused the car to pull to the right. I replaced the tire with a new one and that stopped the pulling, The tire also had a tendency to run hotter tham the other tires. The cause of the problem was the cord was misaligned or overlapped when the tire was made. The dealer had the tire x-rayed and that is what he told me. you could see the tire was raised on one side making it out of balance also. Anytime it takes more than 8 ounces of weight to balance a tire something is wrong. You can balance a concrete block if you put enough weight on the other side.. So take the tire that is running hot and balance it. See if it is out of round. If it is replace it with another tire and see if that helps your problem.

Dee_Dub
03-16-2020, 02:48 PM
Thanks for the explanation! As a computer geek, I was unaware! 😩

masterdrago
03-16-2020, 06:20 PM
Weeks ago I had a tire blowout. I replaced all the OEM F rated tires with G rated Carlisle. Subsequently I installed a TPMS. The cold pressure in each tire is 110 psi as recommended for the load. When driving in 65 F weather at 65 mph I saw the pressure get as high as 135 psi.

A lot of forums say things like "I believe ..." and so on. I'm interested in finding out if anyone knows for a fact, such as a data sheet from a manufacturer, at what pressure I should become concerned. FWIW the maximum temperature reported by the TPMS is 90 F. I've never seen my pressure at 135psi but the tire temperature has been up to 110F. I generally fill to 105 cold and if I saw 135psi, I would be more concerned about my 110psi limited cast aluminum stock rims.

AZ Traveler
03-16-2020, 10:03 PM
I have had my pressure get close to 135. Would not worry unless it was a single tire.

Slow Hand
03-17-2020, 08:44 AM
I have never worried about the tire pressure on a hot tire. I still don't care. I am sure that these tires have been subject to higher temperatures than we would find on the road. After cold PSI is 110 and no one seems to wo0rry about that. OI have towed many miles and at no time have my tires been to hot to touch. I have never checked tire pressures on a hot tire. Only cold tire pressure matters. People have more to worry about than air pressures in a hot tire.

If I worried as much as most folks about stuff like this I would stop RVing. To much stress.

DebNJim B
03-18-2020, 10:18 AM
I find that using a 78% Nitrogen mixture works very well.

Along with this the Nitrogen is preferred because the molecules are larger than oxygen molecules and produce less leakage. So if the oxygen leaks through the rubber tire and you refill with 78% nitrogen eventually you will raise the nitrogen content in the tire well above that 78% level at no cost. Only O leaking out and 3:1 mixture of Ni to O going back in.

McRod
03-18-2020, 10:23 AM
Along with this the Nitrogen is preferred because the molecules are larger than oxygen molecules and produce less leakage. So if the oxygen leaks through the rubber tire and you refill with 78% nitrogen eventually you will raise the nitrogen content in the tire well above that 78% level at no cost. Only O leaking out and 3:1 mixture of Ni to O going back in.

/shakeshead.
/facepalm.

Dixie Flyer
03-20-2020, 08:38 AM
/shakeshead.
/facepalm.

Lack of grease in the wheel bearings can also cause high temperatures in a tire. So be sure you have enough grease in the bearings. Repacking the bearing will satisfy that question.

Dan Giacalone
06-29-2020, 10:57 AM
After reading all these we are "shaking" down our new to us 2012 Montana 3582rl next week. I will b pulling it with my 2003 Ford F350 dually.
What truck and trailer tire pressures should use. I have heard many suggestions. Only going about 40 minutes away but will be on the highway. I have a tst system I need to set up.

AZ Traveler
06-29-2020, 11:08 AM
After reading all these we are "shaking" down our new to us 2012 Montana 3582rl next week. I will b pulling it with my 2003 Ford F350 dually.
What truck and trailer tire pressures should use. I have heard many suggestions. Only going about 40 minutes away but will be on the highway. I have a tst system I need to set up.

I would start with the pressure on the trailer and truck placards.

phillyg
06-29-2020, 01:33 PM
After reading all these we are "shaking" down our new to us 2012 Montana 3582rl next week. I will b pulling it with my 2003 Ford F350 dually.
What truck and trailer tire pressures should use. I have heard many suggestions. Only going about 40 minutes away but will be on the highway. I have a tst system I need to set up.

You need to know at least the rear axle weight with the FW hooked up, and set your rear axle tire pressure according the tire mfgrs. table.

phillyg
06-29-2020, 01:35 PM
After reading all these we are "shaking" down our new to us 2012 Montana 3582rl next week. I will b pulling it with my 2003 Ford F350 dually.
What truck and trailer tire pressures should use. I have heard many suggestions. Only going about 40 minutes away but will be on the highway. I have a tst system I need to set up.

You need to know at least the rear axle weight with the FW hooked up, and set your rear axle tire pressure according the tire mfgrs. table. If you can't get weighed, at least set the tire pressure at max psi for duallies, embossed on the tires.

mlh
06-29-2020, 03:04 PM
I would set the pressure at max for both truck and camper. I see no reason not to. Tires will run cooler and carry more weight at max pressure.
Lynwood

kowbra
08-05-2020, 11:14 AM
I think that's a huge racket. I had nitrogen in the tires on a truck I bought once, the tire pressure still went up and down.

Then you have to find nitrogen to add if you need it, not so easy to find sometimes.

Not my experience -at all... in fact I would say nitrogen has been a game changer for me.

Short version:
-a fraction of variance in pressure due to sitting or temperature changes
-significantly longer tire life

Long version:
I have now had nitrogen in my last couple pickups for over 8 years, and my last RV for 3 years. My tires go from -40F at home in winter to over 110F in AZ late spring. I add air maybe once per year to my RV and a couple times per year on the truck. (that's about 10,000 miles per year on the RV, and 25,000 on the truck). This past winter, checked tires on the RV at -35F before the trip south, and after sitting for over 3 months in AZ, checked them again. The pressure had increased by about 2lbs, so a few seconds to bleed off and good to go.

Before nitrogen, I checked air every couple weeks and usually had to air up or air down when temps changed more than about 20 degrees one way or the other. Prior RV had E rated tires, and on 80lbs with straight air, could easily see pressures lose 5lbs or more after sitting a few weeks... or increase by 5lbs+ if ambient temps went way up.

I don't have a TPMS on the trailer, and since going to nitrogen have had no flats. And, again, a normal pretrip is to check all tires, then usually needing to do nothing further. I may go to TPMS on the new Montana, but again nitrogen has been good to me without it.

BTW, I top up with 78% nitrogen from my Viair when on the road, don't worry about adding the "special stuff". I know I'm diluting and eventually would lose the value of paying for the initial nitrogen... but again the need to add air is so rare that in 4 years on the truck and 3 on the last RV I haven't observed tire pressure changes varying more than when first installed.

One last thing; last truck I went over 50,000 miles on the factory Firestone tires, towing about 30,000 miles of that. 3 year old RV tires look new. Both are much better results than units before nitrogen.

So, I'm a fan, and will continue to pay the small price to have it done every time I buy new tires.

Of course, I present a sample size of 1, and YMMV ;-)

Brad

richfaa
08-05-2020, 12:58 PM
We use G614 tires on the Montana at at 110PSI. We have the TPMS.Yes the tire temp increase with speed and temp being a factor. We use regular old air is the tires.

Mikelff
08-09-2020, 01:30 PM
I have been thinking about getting my 5th wheel tires filled with nitrogen. Nitrogen is not effected by temperature. One place wanted $15.00 per tire and that seemed reasonable.

The deal with Nitrogen, if you took high school chemistry, is that the molecule is larger than o2 and therefore will hold pressure in tires longer. Tires are porous and over time loose pressure from o2 escaping through the walls of the tire. Nitrogen is also less affected by heat causing increased pressure, though pressure will increase with heat, but not as much as O2, thus tires will run cooler. Nitrogen is also less affected by altitude. This is one reason all aircraft tires are nitrogen filled. If you cannot find nitrogen to top off your tire pressure, just use regular air, you will be fine. My local Cosco uses nitrogen and fills my tires for free. $15 for nitrogen filled tires is definitely NOT wort it in my view, but that is your call. Thats the basics for nitrogen filled tires.

kowbra
08-09-2020, 01:38 PM
The deal with Nitrogen, if you took high school chemistry, is that the molecule is larger than o2 and therefore will hold pressure in tires longer. Tires are porous and over time loose pressure from o2 escaping through the walls of the tire. Nitrogen is also less affected by heat causing increased pressure, though pressure will increase with heat, but not as much as O2, thus tires will run cooler. Nitrogen is also less affected by altitude. This is one reason all aircraft tires are nitrogen filled. If you cannot find nitrogen to top off your tire pressure, just use regular air, you will be fine. My local Cosco uses nitrogen and fills my tires for free. $15 for nitrogen filled tires is definitely NOT wort it in my view, but that is your call. Thats the basics for nitrogen filled tires.

Great explanation, thanks!
Agree with all of the advantages, and in my case has translated into no issues with flat tires since converting, many more miles of tread life, not needing to obsess about tire pressures every trip, etc.

So, I'm curious why you think that's not worth $15 per tire?


Brad

Mikelff
08-10-2020, 08:59 AM
Hi Brad, I guess itís a personal choice and what itís worth to you. In most cases, with cars anyway, itís not worth the expense and hassle. With high pressure tires like most of us run on our 5ers (80 psi and up) it does have some benefit in my opinion . I have used nitrogen filled tires for years in my airplane as required. The reason is because of altitude and related pressure swings in tires and to prevent wheel hang up with the landing gear and having a tire get stuck in the well. Mine donít retract so I donít have that issue. I find my tires run cooler, especially in hot weather , and keep a more constant pressure, especially going through the mountains. I get my tires filled for free at my local Costco or the airport. I only run nitrogen in my RV, not my truck. Eventually you will need to add a little nitrogen to bump up your pressure, your paying whatever for just a few pounds. You can add air in a pinch but when you are done with your trip, you need to evacuate your tire again and re-refill it to get the full benefit of using nitrogen. For me, itís an easy fix at no cost, so I do it. Would I pay for it? Probably not. Again, its a personal choice and how much of a value you place on it. Hope that helps.

Dan Giacalone
08-12-2020, 03:25 PM
Second time out with our like new 2012 3582rl Monte. Installed the TST 507 monitor system. Followed directions on pressure settings. G rated tires call out 100 lbs pressure. Set high pressure setting to 20% or 120 lbs. Got on the road. 85 degrees out and humid. Three tires stayed at 117 except one went to 120 set off the alarm then climbed to 121 and stayed there for the rest of the two hour trip via highway. What do you folks set the high pressure alarm at and should I be alarmed. I read this tread and I think 20% should be 25 or 30%
Thoughts?
Thanks

sourdough
08-12-2020, 04:22 PM
Second time out with our like new 2012 3582rl Monte. Installed the TST 507 monitor system. Followed directions on pressure settings. G rated tires call out 100 lbs pressure. Set high pressure setting to 20% or 120 lbs. Got on the road. 85 degrees out and humid. Three tires stayed at 117 except one went to 120 set off the alarm then climbed to 121 and stayed there for the rest of the two hour trip via highway. What do you folks set the high pressure alarm at and should I be alarmed. I read this tread and I think 20% should be 25 or 30%
Thoughts?
Thanks


I set mine for 137. That was based off 110psi with a 25% increase. I'm going to runn 105 this next trip and back that down just a bit to whatever 25% is. When you aired the trailer tires to 100psi what did the TST reflect? If it isn't the same thing there will be a variance in the percentage you figured.

McRod
08-12-2020, 10:23 PM
Second time out with our like new 2012 3582rl Monte. Installed the TST 507 monitor system. Followed directions on pressure settings. G rated tires call out 100 lbs pressure. Set high pressure setting to 20% or 120 lbs. Got on the road. 85 degrees out and humid. Three tires stayed at 117 except one went to 120 set off the alarm then climbed to 121 and stayed there for the rest of the two hour trip via highway. What do you folks set the high pressure alarm at and should I be alarmed. I read this tread and I think 20% should be 25 or 30%
Thoughts?
Thanks

It's % * Max tire pressure. Not % * any tire pressure you set.

So if 20% is what your good with it be .20 * 110 = 132

AZ Traveler
08-12-2020, 10:27 PM
I believe mine are set at 140 for 110 PSI cold tires. I tend to watch for a single tire temp or pressure changing significantly from the others vs what the overall temps and pressures are.

CalandLinda
08-17-2020, 01:03 PM
If your tires continue to heat to 135 degrees it could be that you are overloading them. Find some scales and check it out.

You could also slow down 5 MPH on one leg of your next trip to see what the temp goes to. The closer you get to the axles maximum load the more effect the tire speed will have on higher temps.

drjjj
08-17-2020, 02:11 PM
I'm running G614's at 110 psi cold. TST monitoring system (not sure which model-recently upgraded to the latest). When I was going through AZ almost two years ago my tires got up to 137-138 driving 65 on the interstate. I use Southwest Wheel here in San Antonio for all my tire/wheel/axle work. I trust them implicitly. They have been in business for almost 100 years and do everything from "routine" maintenance to custom building trailers for everyone from motorhome owners to South Texas ranchers to you name it. When I quizzed the owner he told me that unless one tire is significantly higher than the others as far as temperature or pressure goes (or low on pressure) not to worry. So far so good. My $.02.

AZ Traveler
08-17-2020, 02:45 PM
We are seeing pavement temps of 140 - I would not expect to see the tires run much cooler than the pavement.

Texan
08-17-2020, 05:51 PM
I set mine for 137. That was based off 110psi with a 25% increase. I'm going to runn 105 this next trip and back that down just a bit to whatever 25% is. When you aired the trailer tires to 100psi what did the TST reflect? If it isn't the same thing there will be a variance in the percentage you figured.
I keep my tires at 110 psi especially this time of the year. If you are traveling on concrete then your tires will heat up less than on blacktop but most people travel on blacktop more than concrete. At 105 psi your overall pressure may be as high or higher than the 110psi because of more tire surface on the road.

sourdough
08-17-2020, 06:15 PM
I keep my tires at 110 psi especially this time of the year. If you are traveling on concrete then your tires will heat up less than on blacktop but most people travel on blacktop more than concrete. At 105 psi your overall pressure may be as high or higher than the 110psi because of more tire surface on the road.


Thanks. On my initial drive from TX to FL I ran at 110psi. When I hit expansion joints and holes I felt the jolt from the truck hitting and then the trailer. I never experienced that with my last trailer and the MorRyde suspension. This one has the Road Armor so don't know if it's as good or not yet. I also went from LRF to G before I took it off the lot (and they are overkill for the trailer) so that is a contributor as well I figure. Want the LRG and won't go below 105psi so guess it would be putting a MorRyde on in place of the Road Armor if that is the cause.

PSFORD99
08-18-2020, 09:12 AM
I set mine for 137. That was based off 110psi with a 25% increase. I'm going to runn 105 this next trip and back that down just a bit to whatever 25% is. When you aired the trailer tires to 100psi what did the TST reflect? If it isn't the same thing there will be a variance in the percentage you figured.


My tire gauge differs about 3 psi different then my TST 507 readings . I set my high pressure a bit too low, and got the warning. Had to reset , one tire creeped over 1 psi on the high pressure setting. I usually run 100 psi on my G rated tires .

Turner 614
08-19-2020, 01:48 PM
So at what point do you get concerned with the stock rims being rated for 110PSI?

PSFORD99
08-20-2020, 08:47 AM
So at what point do you get concerned with the stock rims being rated for 110PSI?


Me personally I don't worry about the wheels. Pretty sure like the tires rated for 110 psi, they know pressures will increase as it heats up. I am seeing at times around a 20 psi increase in tire pressure .

Texan
08-20-2020, 09:10 AM
So at what point do you get concerned with the stock rims being rated for 110PSI?
I would worry more about my stock rims cracking from hitting chug holes than from tire pressure. The spokes in the aluminum wheels are the weak point and i had 2 go bad so replaced all with modular wheels.