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djgodden
02-27-2020, 03:29 PM
I have a 2005 2955RL with Dexter D52-8 axles. The rim is 16 inch, does anyone know if the rim can take a 110 psi tire? I've looked on the spokes and can't find a mark. I think they are 80 psi max.

Thanks!

Jeff Myers
02-27-2020, 04:19 PM
The wheels are usually stamped on the inside, or should I say the back side....

Carl n Susan
02-27-2020, 04:37 PM
The 2005 rims are definitely limited to 80 PSI. Tredit did upgrade the rating for 2009/2010 rims to 110 PSI but then the lawyers got involved aand they backed down. If it isn't stamped on the spoke on the inside, then they are 80 PSI.

LoneStar
02-27-2020, 06:14 PM
I'm 99.9% certain that your 2005 rims are not suitable for 110 PSI.

Slow Hand
02-28-2020, 09:18 AM
My 03 has 80 PSI wheels and my 3280 is just fine on the tires I got. Currently using Mastercraft tires. I have 1,000's of miles on them without any issues. I like the idea of being able to run lower air pressure tires because the more air the harder the tires. Here in California are smooth as glass (NOT) having a hard tire makes the rv ride ruff. I like a softer sidewall tire. I do wish there were a better way for them to mount the shocks as they look like they don't do much to help with the ride.

Dave W
02-29-2020, 04:49 AM
Yes, you can use a 110psig tire on an 80 psig rated wheel - just as long as they aren't inflated over 80psig. With a Sailun you will lose 330 pound of load per tire capacity at 80 psig. I suspect other brands are about the same but you will need to confirm

CalandLinda
02-29-2020, 07:23 AM
I have a 2005 2955RL with Dexter D52-8 axles. The rim is 16 inch, does anyone know if the rim can take a 110 psi tire? I've looked on the spokes and can't find a mark. I think they are 80 psi max.

Thanks!

I really don't think your wheels will be rated higher than 80 PSI, especially if they are original equipment wheels. There were very few RV trailers in 2005 that required tires rated higher than 80 PSI and surely not on 5200# axles.

Wheels are not required to have load and PSI specs displayed on them. That's usually something the OEM provider requests from the wheel manufacturer. They are required to have model numbers and manufacturer identification and the best way to find their individual specs is to request the manufacturer to provide it.

h2ojocky
02-29-2020, 10:54 PM
I have the same trailer as yours. 80 psi rims. our trailers do not need 110 psi wheels because our trailers are much lighter. Check out the tires that I use. I am on my second set and very happy with them.

StageCoachDriver
03-04-2020, 03:40 PM
Usually 110 psi rims have full stainless steel valve stems. 85 psi valve stems are steel with rubber bases. Less than 85 will have full rubber valve stems.

G & S Russell
03-04-2020, 10:12 PM
Just to clear up the valve stem issue.
Rubber Stems are rated to 45 psi
There are High Pressure Rubber Stems that will go to 110 psi
And there are Metal Stems that all require some sort of rubber washer to seal to the wheel that are also regarded as high pressure.
And while I’m at it, you can put a 14 ply tire on a wheel rated at 80 psi and inflate it to 100 psi without fearing wheel failure.
If any one with more than 50 years in the tire business wants to contradict this, I will gladly listen, but in the real world we mounted hundreds of 14 ply on trailer wheels at 100 psi without a wheel failure.
That’s just the way it is.
I’m not the brightest bulb on the forum, but I do know tires.

CalandLinda
03-04-2020, 11:05 PM
Just to clear up the valve stem issue.
Rubber Stems are rated to 45 psi
There are High Pressure Rubber Stems that will go to 110 psi
And there are Metal Stems that all require some sort of rubber washer to seal to the wheel that are also regarded as high pressure.
And while I’m at it, you can put a 14 ply tire on a wheel rated at 80 psi and inflate it to 100 psi without fearing wheel failure.
If any one with more than 50 years in the tire business wants to contradict this, I will gladly listen, but in the real world we mounted hundreds of 14 ply on trailer wheels at 100 psi without a wheel failure.
That’s just the way it is.
I’m not the brightest bulb on the forum, but I do know tires.

The Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE) certifies wheels/rims. Why do you suppose they certify them to load and PSI limits?

Slow Hand
03-05-2020, 07:14 AM
It amazes me that people think that a tire with 110 PSI in it is no big deal. That's a lot of pressure. Even a 80 PSI tire is nothing to take lightly. It's doesn't surprise me that people who had the China Bombs had tire failures. Along with that trailer damage. Can you imagine the explosion of a blowout on a tire with that much air in it. People should respect a tire with so much air in them. Even a brand new tire can have a problem. I see all these guys checking tire pressure at campgrounds and getting out there little air compressors LOL. If you have to add air you have a leak and you need to fix the tire.

A 110 PSI tire is nothing to mess with. So be careful around them.

StageCoachDriver
03-05-2020, 08:05 AM
Just to clear up the valve stem issue.
Rubber Stems are rated to 45 psi
There are High Pressure Rubber Stems that will go to 110 psi
And there are Metal Stems that all require some sort of rubber washer to seal to the wheel that are also regarded as high pressure.
And while I知 at it, you can put a 14 ply tire on a wheel rated at 80 psi and inflate it to 100 psi without fearing wheel failure.
If any one with more than 50 years in the tire business wants to contradict this, I will gladly listen, but in the real world we mounted hundreds of 14 ply on trailer wheels at 100 psi without a wheel failure.
That痴 just the way it is.
I知 not the brightest bulb on the forum, but I do know tires.


Thanks for the correction on the rubber stems!

CalandLinda
03-05-2020, 08:28 AM
Thanks for the correction on the rubber stems!

Valve stem descriptions and PSI ratings.

https://www.etrailer.com/search/Tire+Valve+Stems

Dave W
03-05-2020, 08:55 AM
I'm swiching to all Milton Clamp In valve stems after a failure last fall. Five years old and the valve stem actually crumbled in my hand. It had started to break off so I just gave it a slight tug and it popped loose and after the tire was almost flat. This side of the 5er seldom faces the direct sun so that may not have been the failure mode - they were probably on the bottom of the box and were old.



Yeah the clamp in stems cost a few bucks each but that peace of mind is worth it to me: https://www.amazon.com/Milton-470-Clamp-Tubeless-Valve/dp/B000FN8IWY


You do need to confirn the hole size in the wheel though plus you may need a short extension such as the Alligator V2B which I also have, JIC needed to use the TPMS

Budman229
03-05-2020, 08:59 AM
Our current RV has H rated Sailun tires that need 125psi cold. On a warm day, the pressure while driving will increase to around 142 psi.

Hblick48
03-05-2020, 10:10 AM
Just to clear up the valve stem issue.
Rubber Stems are rated to 45 psi
There are High Pressure Rubber Stems that will go to 110 psi
And there are Metal Stems that all require some sort of rubber washer to seal to the wheel that are also regarded as high pressure.
And while I知 at it, you can put a 14 ply tire on a wheel rated at 80 psi and inflate it to 100 psi without fearing wheel failure.
If any one with more than 50 years in the tire business wants to contradict this, I will gladly listen, but in the real world we mounted hundreds of 14 ply on trailer wheels at 100 psi without a wheel failure.
That痴 just the way it is.
I知 not the brightest bulb on the forum, but I do know tires.

You are correct if the wheel is steel and you have the properly rated valve stem. Not so if the rims are an aluminum alloy.

I was in the wheel repair business for 10 years prior to retiring. Every once in a while, a customer would come in with a wheel that was leaking through the barrel, and there were no cracks. Turned out to be a flaw in the casting that provided a path for air to escape. Cutting out that section and welding in new metal usually fixed it.

Fast forward to two years ago. I upgraded from load range E to F, going from 80 psi to 95 psi. I didn't check that the wheel was rated to 80 psi max. 3/4 way into cross country trip, noticed an almost flat tire during a rest stop. Put on spare, got home, and had flat checked by people who bought shop from me. Turned out that I had a leak as described above. Higher air pressure opened up a path for air to escape. Would have never happened at 80 psi. Needless to say, I put on 4 steel wheels with appropriate valve stems. Just installed 14 ply G rated all steel tires, glad I already had proper wheels.

Next time we take out rig, going to have it weighed so I can inflate by the chart.

G & S Russell
03-05-2020, 01:14 PM
You are correct if the wheel is steel and you have the properly rated valve stem. Not so if the rims are an aluminum alloy.

I was in the wheel repair business for 10 years prior to retiring. Every once in a while, a customer would come in with a wheel that was leaking through the barrel, and there were no cracks. Turned out to be a flaw in the casting that provided a path for air to escape. Cutting out that section and welding in new metal usually fixed it.

Fast forward to two years ago. I upgraded from load range E to F, going from 80 psi to 95 psi. I didn't check that the wheel was rated to 80 psi max. 3/4 way into cross country trip, noticed an almost flat tire during a rest stop. Put on spare, got home, and had flat checked by people who bought shop from me. Turned out that I had a leak as described above. Higher air pressure opened up a path for air to escape. Would have never happened at 80 psi. Needless to say, I put on 4 steel wheels with appropriate valve stems. Just installed 14 ply G rated all steel tires, glad I already had proper wheels.

Next time we take out rig, going to have it weighed so I can inflate by the chart.

的t never would have happened at 80 psi. I知 wondering how you know that. If all it takes is 15 psi to go from perfectly fine to failure, I contend that wheel would have started leaking at 80 also, but that is just my opinion. The operating pressure goes up considerably depending on a bunch of factors. I would think the wheels are engineered to take that in consideration and have a degree of tolerance that would preclude an extra 15 psi causing failure. Did your other three wheels fail also? Sometimes it痴 just a bad wheel.

Hblick48
03-05-2020, 02:37 PM
的t never would have happened at 80 psi. I知 wondering how you know that. If all it takes is 15 psi to go from perfectly fine to failure, I contend that wheel would have started leaking at 80 also, but that is just my opinion. The operating pressure goes up considerably depending on a bunch of factors. I would think the wheels are engineered to take that in consideration and have a degree of tolerance that would preclude an extra 15 psi causing failure. Did your other three wheels fail also? Sometimes it痴 just a bad wheel.

I've seen barrel leaks at lower pressures on passenger tire wheels.

During the casting process, sometimes there are small voids created when the molten metal crystallizes back to a solid. This is especially so in lower priced wheels (more contaminates in the molten metal). When you grind into it, looks like black corrosion pockets. Eventually, the flaw opens up, especially if the air pressure exceeds mfg. specs. I've also seen it on brand new wheels that would leak at 30 psi. In 10 years in the wheel repair business, I've seen it happen 15-20 times.

Just happened on one wheel on my RV. Others were fine, but all got replaced with steel ones.

Khanscel
03-05-2020, 04:31 PM
Tires will wear out on outsides if not inflated to 110 psi

Hblick48
03-05-2020, 04:52 PM
Not necessarily with all steel G rated tires. See Sailun inflation chart below:

CalandLinda
03-05-2020, 09:35 PM
Not necessarily with all steel G rated tires. See Sailun inflation chart below:

How is the correct recommended cold inflation pressures for your vehicles established?

Tire manufacturers do not establish recommended cold inflation pressures for your vehicles. They provide load inflation charts for the tires they build. Those inflation charts are then standardized by the TRA for dissemination by those that do establish recommended cold inflation pressures for your vehicles. Vehicle manufacturers.

Dave W
03-06-2020, 05:11 AM
Tires will wear out on outsides if not inflated to 110 psi


In other words the 80 psig rated front tires on my signature truck that are factory recommended to be set at 65psig will wear that way. Not on 3 sets in 126,000 miles and the significant unloaded weight is on the front.

Hblick48
03-06-2020, 09:40 AM
In other words the 80 psig rated front tires on my signature truck that are factory recommended to be set at 65psig will wear that way. Not on 3 sets in 126,000 miles and the significant unloaded weight is on the front.

I'm not a tire expert, but I know a few things about tires. ST tires (made for trailers) are made differently than car or truck tires. In fact, Sailun specifically states that its trailer tires are not designed to be used on any other vehicle type.

All tires have a "max psi" on the sidewall. Normally this has no relationship to the suggested tire pressure specified by the vehicle manufacturer. You would never run a car or truck at the "max psi" as indicated.

The "max psi" on trailer tires specifically relates to the maximum load the tire can carry. Radial ST tires up to load range F have nylon body cords and steel on the tread. Must always run at the "max psi" as indicated on sidewall.

Radial ST tires load range G and up have steel cords everywhere. Weigh the rig fully loaded for a trip and inflate per the inflation chart.

At least that's the way I understand it. Others please chime in.

Dave W
03-06-2020, 10:28 AM
I'm not a tire expert


Nor am I but I actually try to do my due diligence research tho not to the depth of others


Sailun specifically states that its trailer tires are not designed to be used on any other vehicle type.

You're right.



All tires have a "max psi" on the sidewall. Normally this has no relationship to the suggested tire pressure specified by the vehicle manufacturer. You would never run a car or truck at the "max psi" as indicated.



That's absolutely incorrect. The 275/75-18 tires on my truck have an 80psig max pressure molded on the side wall and that is the 'B' piller stated pressure as well and required for full load capacty of 3640 pounds each. The TPMS will tell me when those tires drop down below about 75psig The E rated tires on our 5er - 80 psig max molded on the sidewall and exactly what the sticker on the side of the trailer says for max load capacity.


Radial ST tires load range G and up have steel cords everywhere. Weigh the rig fully loaded for a trip and inflate per the inflation chart.



I think you had better spend some time on a site like Simple Tire where you will find that yes, there are some with all steel construction, including Sailun, many if not most are tread area only with polyester sidewalls.

CalandLinda
03-06-2020, 11:10 AM
All tires have a "max psi" on the sidewall. Normally this has no relationship to the suggested tire pressure specified by the vehicle manufacturer.

The "max psi" on trailer tires specifically relates to the maximum load the tire can carry.


The maximum load capacity of a tire is molded onto all DOT highway certified tires. The maximum load capacity is accompanied by a PSI value needed to gain that maximum load capacity from the tire.

That particular information is provided to inform installers/consumers not to exceed those values.

It's pure and simple.

Twopetes
03-06-2020, 02:07 PM
Interesting tidbit. On my HC-353 - I have 110 PSI Alum Alloy rims (stamped on the inside of one of the spokes) and yet I have steel stems but rubber seats (factory equipment). And I have the TPMS sending units on them and never had an issue - I run about 90 PSI. Because 110 PSI seems too hard - like a rock and I don't need the weight capacity.

And just for info - I am running Saliun 637's