PDA

View Full Version : What Class Driver License do you have.


7.3Ford
12-16-2019, 08:20 PM
Hi Folks,

We just sold are 2001 Ford F350, which had a GVWR of 9,900 lbs. We have a new 2020 RAM 3500 SRW on order with a GVWR of 12,300 lbs. The Montana has a GVWR of 16,000 lbs. I watch a video last night, and have done some research today, and it appears about 2-3 years ago most states now for call for a non-commercial Class A license or as in my state SC, a Class F RV license. Our truck and trailer scaled in just under 26,000 as well as CGVWR 9,900+16,000. But here is the kicker, they don't use scale weight, the use the GVWR of the vehicles (12,300+16,000=28,300 lbs), so now I will need to get a Class F license, even if I scale below 26,000 lbs.

So how many folks have standard Class C license, and how many have the next level up? How did you get your 5th wheel to DMV to take the driving test, when you don't have anyone around with a Class F (RV over 26,000 lbs) license either?

If you get pulled over or in accident and have the wrong class, the will write you up for driving without a license. Again most states require other than Class C if the CGVWR on the manufacturers sticker is over 26,000 lbs.

jetskier
12-16-2019, 08:42 PM
After I bought the Montana, I upgraded my class C with >10k towing "J" endorsement to a non-commercial class A. Cat scale said 26,700#.

I just drove it to DMV. The DMV examiners didn't question it since I had the heavy tow endorsement. They even questioned why I was taking the test. I had to explain the 26k part. :facepalm:

AZ Traveler
12-16-2019, 09:09 PM
No special license required in AZ for RVs.

Mtncrash1
12-17-2019, 02:38 AM
Hi Folks,

We just sold are 2001 Ford F350, which had a GVWR of 9,900 lbs. We have a new 2020 RAM 3500 SRW on order with a GVWR of 12,300 lbs. The Montana has a GVWR of 16,000 lbs. I watch a video last night, and have done some research today, and it appears about 2-3 years ago most states now for call for a non-commercial Class A license or as in my state SC, a Class F RV license. Our truck and trailer scaled in just under 26,000 as well as CGVWR 9,900+16,000. But here is the kicker, they don't use scale weight, the use the GVWR of the vehicles (12,300+16,000=28,300 lbs), so now I will need to get a Class F license, even if I scale below 26,000 lbs.

So how many folks have standard Class C license, and how many have the next level up? How did you get your 5th wheel to DMV to take the driving test, when you don't have anyone around with a Class F (RV over 26,000 lbs) license either?

If you get pulled over or in accident and have the wrong class, the will write you up for driving without a license. Again most states require other than Class C if the CGVWR on the manufacturers sticker is over 26,000 lbs.

Yep it doesnít matter what you scale at,itís the potential of running at the gcwr. Even in the commercial world they look at the gross. Nebraska doesnít require a special endorsement however for work reasons I do have a class A cdl.

mlh
12-17-2019, 08:57 AM
I guess mine is a C with a M for my motorcycle. I got a new Cam Am Ryker.

PNW Fireguy
12-17-2019, 09:15 AM
Thank goodness Washington state has not delved into that pool ...yet.

JABURKHOLDER
12-17-2019, 10:11 AM
I've been RVing since 2003 with no issues, but after reading this post, I decided to call my local BMV. I provided them my weights;
(truck 14000lbs GVWR, RV 16960lbs GVWR - 30960lbs GCWR).
According to the Ohio BMV, no CDL or special endorsement is required for towing an RV.

WHEW !

jeffba
12-17-2019, 12:23 PM
By most states I think you mean 8 states. Check with your DMV, they will tell you if you have to have a licensed driver bring you. CA is the only one that I am aware of that requires that. TX does not require you have a licensed driver accompany you.

DQDick
12-17-2019, 01:58 PM
When Kansas went to needing a motorcycle endorsement we were just asked if we wanted one. After that you had to test etc. Hopefully if they get a wild hair and decied we need another license they'll do the same thing.

Theunz
12-17-2019, 02:17 PM
I just renewed my CDL even though I retired about 2 years ago and don't ever anticipate driving commercially ever again. Not really sure if I need it, but the regulations seem a little ambiguous. All I know is that if I do need it, or they start requiring it, it's a lot easier to renew than to reapply

BB_TX
12-17-2019, 02:35 PM
I know Texas requires a class A non CDL over 26,000 GCWR but don’t know what is required you do to get it. I am below that.

PeteandJoan
12-17-2019, 05:03 PM
I know Texas requires a class A non CDL over 26,000 GCWR but donít know what is required you do to get it. I am below that.

If you have a simple Class C (standard drivers license) and are towing 26,000+ (RV & Truck) combined gross wt. then you need to go take a test (written & Driving) to get a Class A. If You have a CDL but don't want it or need it you can simply downgrade to Class A. There is also a Class B for towing less . It gets pretty complicated talking about the specific weights of trailer being towed so check with DPS online to see what you need. I had CDL but they started changing the requirements for that and I did not need any more hassles and did not need CDL anymore so I just downgraded.

Daryles
12-17-2019, 05:50 PM
Found this. Not sure how old it is. Hope it helps
https://www.campanda.com/magazine/rv-special-drivers-license-requirements/

TennTom
12-17-2019, 06:17 PM
I just renewed my CDL even though I retired about 2 years ago and don't ever anticipate driving commercially ever again. Not really sure if I need it, but the regulations seem a little ambiguous. All I know is that if I do need it, or they start requiring it, it's a lot easier to renew than to reapply
I am with you. TN does not require one, yet, but I prefer to renew my CDL than to reapply if the law changes.

rohrmann
12-17-2019, 08:32 PM
A regular drivers license is all that is needed in South Dakota for towing an RV and is probably all that is needed for driving a motorhome.

Kyle and Lisa
12-18-2019, 06:58 AM
I know Texas requires a class A non CDL over 26,000 GCWR but donít know what is required you do to get it. I am below that.

Yes that is what I have now as of this year when we passed back through Texas after reading the article in our Escapees bi-monthly magazine. There are practice test and info on what you need to know through the Texas DMV on line before you go and take the actual written and driving test. I took the written and driving test when we stayed in Fredericksburg Texas. Not all DMV'S offer the driving test and you have to schedule it. :thumbsup:

richfaa
12-18-2019, 09:03 AM
No special requirements in Ohio just a plain ole drivers license IF you are not pulling for hire.

BB_TX
12-19-2019, 06:57 PM
Yes that is what I have now as of this year when we passed back through Texas after reading the article in our Escapees bi-monthly magazine. There are practice test and info on what you need to know through the Texas DMV on line before you go and take the actual written and driving test. I took the written and driving test when we stayed in Fredericksburg Texas. Not all DMV'S offer the driving test and you have to schedule it. :thumbsup:

No plans to take the test, but curious. What does the driving test consist of? Do you have to parallel park it? :D

jeffba
12-20-2019, 12:13 PM
No plans to take the test, but curious. What does the driving test consist of? Do you have to parallel park it? :D

That is the discretion of the examiner

Nat_Park_Travelers
12-22-2019, 01:08 PM
It's going to depend on your rig and your state of residence. This page shows the current licensing requirements for the states - hope this helps:

http://changingears.com/rv-sec-state-rv-license.shtml?fbclid=IwAR3ogDFcVJaHiWAyje46C-V5D_rQ2z3WG6z9rfs_MuyXbIE_v3knSjWtl04

KevinW
12-22-2019, 01:12 PM
I'm in Tx and got the non cdl class A license and had to parallel park truck and trailer. The DMV by my house was very clear that I had to have a licensed driver bring the rig to the dmv for the test. I enrolled into a class A driving school for $150. They provide a vehicle for the test and with the videos/ materials they give made the written part easy also. Plus they allow you to practice parallel parking with their rig.

Nat_Park_Travelers
12-22-2019, 01:17 PM
I'm in Tx and got the non cdl class A license and had to parallel park truck and trailer. The DMV by my house was very clear that I had to have a licensed driver bring the rig to the dmv for the test. I enrolled into a class A driving school for $150. They provide a vehicle for the test and with the videos/ materials they give made the written part easy also. Plus they allow you to practice parallel parking with their rig.

In PA you don't need to take a written test for the non-commercial Class A. I'm under the limits here so I did not upgrade my license. Yes I was told you had to have somebody with the same class license as you to bring you to the driving
test.

davemitchell59
12-22-2019, 01:34 PM
As others have said, it all depends on your State. I checked with MS when we bought last year. While they require Class A for our GCWR, RVs are exempt. So, we kept our Class C licenses and we both drive.

Personally, I'm fine with it either way. I think I could take our rig down to DMV and get a valid Class A CDL license. So, it's strange I'm not required to have one to drive it.

bigfrank
12-22-2019, 01:47 PM
I am with you. TN does not require one, yet, but I prefer to renew my CDL than to reapply if the law changes.

I retired 8yrs ago and just renewed my cdl in ga for 8 yrs again just so I will not have any hassles in the future

saber707
12-22-2019, 03:11 PM
Class C works fine in 99.9% of cases.

Coronabob
12-22-2019, 06:17 PM
California requires a non commercial class a, if the towed vehicle weighs over 15,000 lbs. i did mine about 4 years go. Needed someone to take you in. Had to do written, pre trip, drive test. I used a commercial school. Theyhepled with backing skills etc. $100 well spent and they had a driver go with me to get it there.

Otto02
12-22-2019, 09:53 PM
California, of course, requires a non commercial class A if the GVWR of the trailer is over 15,000. Written test and then a full CDL driving test. They have a separate RV test. I love the parallel parking of our 42 ft. Montana.

Jimmer
12-22-2019, 10:25 PM
California has had the RV requirement out for some time. If the RV is 10,000 lbs to 14999 lbs GVW ( look on left side of your RV for the info label). you have to have a endorsement on your license. You will Just have to take the written test. When you go down to take the written test you take your regular test and if you have motorcycle endorsement you will take that test also. If your label reads that the trailer is 15000 lbs and above you will have to have a Non Commercial Class A license. I studied for all 3 tests and went down and took the written test for my regular license, my motorcycle endorsement and the RV test. I passed that and they also did my eye test. They gave me a permit to tow my 5th wheel but I had to have a another person with a Non Commercial License or Class A License with me. I made a appointment to take the drivers test and the inspection test. When I went down to take my test I had a buddy with me that had the Non Commercial License. You have to show the inspector that you know all of the things you check on the truck and the trailer. When that is done then we went to take the drivers test. They had me back up in a straight line, next I had to back up straight and then guide it in the next lane to the left. and then back it in to a space like you are going to camp in that space. After that we went and drove all over town for about 30 minutes. I am sure all DMV offices are different. It is in the RV book you can get at a DMV office. I was going to skip this until I heard about a guy that got stopped and when he did not have the proper license he was told he would have to park his rig until he got the right license. Can you imagine getting stopped and have to park your rig,

Jim Bonhote, 2014 3582 RL, 2015 Ford F350 Platinum

skypilot
12-23-2019, 07:37 AM
Kansas requires a non-commercial class A if your trailer GVWR is over 10K, or the combined GVWR weigh of truck and trailer is greater than 26000 pounds. When I went to get mine upgraded from a C to Non-commercial A, I was not asked who brought the rig over - examiner probably didn't want to know :eek:.


That said, I had to take a written exam and then a very thorough driving test (backing, 90 degree parking, parallel parking, driving in residential area, driving in highway with lane changes, etc.) When I got back the examiner told me I had to go to Junction City KS to get my actual license -- asked why and was told that Junction City was where they issued CDLs. Huh - I told the examiner I was only there for the non-commercial A. Ended up that I had just passed the CDL driving test. Regardless, now legal with a non-commercial A license. BTW - KS also has an air brake endorsement that applies to those driving vehicles with air brakes.



Sorry for being so long winded but one last thing - when I was researching this stuff I asked three different dealer's sales people about the license requirements - specifically while looking at some toy haulers with GVWRs of 20K and each told me that nothing other than a normal drivers license is required. Bottom line - research, research and research. The answer you get the first time MAY be incorrect.



Wishing all safe travels and the best of the Holidays to you all.

Randy E
12-23-2019, 07:41 AM
Class A CDL for me in Pennsylvania. I kept it after many years of over the road tractor trailer driving. No need in canceling it.

Kyle and Lisa
12-23-2019, 02:18 PM
No plans to take the test, but curious. What does the driving test consist of? Do you have to parallel park it? :D

Per the instructions on line, I was supposed to have backed up a required distance in between cones without hitting them or points would be deducted. Not so in this case I had to backup about a 100' along a curb without hitting it and maintain about a 1' from the curb while backing.

jpwhite
12-26-2019, 10:34 AM
So Ö. what are the rules if you are properly licensed in your home state with no requirement for a special license or indorsement, but are traveling in a state that does require a special license or indorsement?

Nat_Park_Travelers
12-26-2019, 10:38 AM
So Ö. what are the rules if you are properly licensed in your home state with no requirement for a special license or indorsement, but are traveling in a state that does require a special license or indorsement?

As I understand it, unless something has changed since I drove an 18-wheeler (that was years ago), they are supposed to go by the regulations in your state of residence.

Daryles
12-26-2019, 01:28 PM
So …. what are the rules if you are properly licensed in your home state with no requirement for a special license or indorsement, but are traveling in a state that does require a special license or indorsement?

Agreement between states. Drivers license respriocity.
https://www.quora.com/How-did-we-get-reciprocity-of-state-drivers-licenses

bigfrank
12-26-2019, 02:44 PM
answer to jjwhite I have a class A cdl from Ga. with three endorsements I retired from commercial driving that is why I still have this license do not need it in Ga.to pull my Rv hope this answered your question

RV6A
12-26-2019, 05:03 PM
Class A

DebNJim B
01-08-2020, 06:51 PM
Had a cdl with tanker and air brake endorsement for many years. The federal government sets the standards I presume because they control interstate commerce, so it's the same in every state. The "C" however stands for commercial which and RV is not. It's just too bad the states can't get together and standardize licensing for RV's. That would eliminate all the confusion.

BTW I let my cdl go the last time it was up for renewal partly do to the cost but also it gave me an out when someone wanted me to drive for them. I take my retirement seriously.

Slufoot733
01-09-2020, 05:01 PM
I live in PA. This past spring I went through this issue and caused myself a lot of worry about it. I drive a 2016 F350 with a 'registered' GVWR of 11,000 (Ford rated this truck for 11,500). My Monty weighs 12,040 empty but is 'registered' at 17,000 (Keystone rated it for 16,700). 11k + 17k + 28K.

Now, with that in mind I obtained study guides and got my CDL learners permit. After studying the manuals and watching a million videos I scheduled a CDL NON commercial class A test. I enlisted a friend's help (he has a CDL) to go with me since I could drive alone on the permit. We drive 80 miles to the test center only to be asked by the examiner, and his supervisor, "why are you here?". I explained that I'm registered for 28K CVGWR and need the Non-com class A license. I was told by the examiner "unless this RV is used for commercial purposes I do NOT need the class A license. It's a private, pleasure vehicle, not used in commerce or for profit. If I painted 'Kevin's French Frys' on the side then I would need the class A." We were sent on our way with an "enjoy your RV and drive safe". So we drove the 80 miles back to face my wife.....who couldn't believe it!

To be honest, I am still confused. I cannot get a straight answer from anybody. State police friends of mine are split on this also. But most have stated they would never mess with an RV like this unless it was driving erratically or some other good reason. I only hope this doesn't come back to bite me 'you know where!'.

jetskier
01-09-2020, 05:18 PM
I live in PA. This past spring I went through this issue and caused myself a lot of worry about it. I drive a 2016 F350 with a 'registered' GVWR of 11,000 (Ford rated this truck for 11,500). My Monty weighs 12,040 empty but is 'registered' at 17,000 (Keystone rated it for 16,700). 11k + 17k + 28K.

Now, with that in mind I obtained study guides and got my CDL learners permit. After studying the manuals and watching a million videos I scheduled a CDL NON commercial class A test. I enlisted a friend's help (he has a CDL) to go with me since I could drive alone on the permit. We drive 80 miles to the test center only to be asked by the examiner, and his supervisor, "why are you here?". I explained that I'm registered for 28K CVGWR and need the Non-com class A license. I was told by the examiner "unless this RV is used for commercial purposes I do NOT need the class A license. It's a private, pleasure vehicle, not used in commerce or for profit. If I painted 'Kevin's French Frys' on the side then I would need the class A." We were sent on our way with an "enjoy your RV and drive safe". So we drove the 80 miles back to face my wife.....who couldn't believe it!

To be honest, I am still confused. I cannot get a straight answer from anybody. State police friends of mine are split on this also. But most have stated they would never mess with an RV like this unless it was driving erratically or some other good reason. I only hope this doesn't come back to bite me 'you know where!'.


You should have insisted. The DMV staff usually isn't educated. I had to educate my locate office. After a little explanation, we proceeded with the pre-trip inspection, straight-line backup, pull-up and an alley dock and then the on-road drive test. It doesn't matter if it's an RV. An RV is non-commercial and it is above 26k therefore a Non-commercial Class A is required. I googled the PA DOT fact sheet and it's doesn't mention exemptions for RVs like they stated.


https://www.dot.state.pa.us/Public/DVSPubsForms/BDL/BDL%20Fact%20Sheets/Non%20commercial%20A%20and%20B%20fact%20sheet.pdf

jetskier
01-09-2020, 05:24 PM
Here's more proof...They use an RV in the NC Class A section::facepalm:


https://www.dmv.pa.gov/Driver-Services/Driver-Information/License-Types/Pages/default.aspx

BB_TX
01-09-2020, 06:41 PM
Texas is very similar and also mentions an RV in regard to class A non commercial license.

https://www.dps.texas.gov/driverlicense/dlclasses.htm

432bartman
05-29-2020, 10:38 PM
Class C & M1 for a motorcycle endorsement

DanandBrenda
05-30-2020, 06:17 AM
I have a class A CDL with doubles, triples and tanks and motorcycle endorsement. I need the CDL for work but not for the rv.

richfaa
05-30-2020, 07:42 AM
In Ohio no special class is required for for the RV.

skypilot
05-30-2020, 09:38 AM
The issue here in KS is not the RV itself, it is total GVWR. In my case, my 5th wheel has a GVWR of 17,500. My truck's GVWR is 14,000. Therefore I am at 31,500 GVWR. So I fall under the provisions that the RV plus tow vehicle are over 26,000 total GVWR which requires a Non-Commercial Class A license.


There is another provision that says a trailer that exceeds 10,000 GVWR requires a special license, but RV's are exempt from this portion of the rules, at least according to the DMV here. Unfortunately, not the 26,000 GVRW rule :confused:



I was not a happy person when I found all this out, especially since I've been told numerous times over the years that I needed nothing different than my Class C license.

Charlie 3931fb
05-30-2020, 02:12 PM
Hey All,

I have a Class "A" CDL and have all the endorsement's except school & passenger bus. I also have a "M 1" for our bike's. I have all way's had a CDL since my 20's because of work. so I keep it current with my medical now every year. Sofia got here Class "A" non-commercial when we got the 5500 Dodge. She has to do a medical every 4 year's I think.

I ask a CHP friend of mine and he said that most state's will not bother you with a licence even if you needed one. Most of the time when something happen's like a ticket or accident they all way's have the answer that the dealership never told us that we needed to get a CDL for this rig.

In the same turn, I was pulled over one time for speed, when they found out that I was on a CDL they asked for my log book. This guy was trying to be a same ass. When I came back at him with I don;t have a Freight bill because it was not a commercial haul, and I have private coach on the side of my truck, that shut him up quick .

It's just a way for the state to make money.


Charlie

Montana Man
05-31-2020, 08:19 AM
Class C & M1 for a motorcycle endorsement

If that's a CA license you'll need to add a non commercial class A.

jking
05-31-2020, 08:05 PM
John I have a very similiar rig and I can tell you that the truck and trailer are Perfectly matched! I couldnít have done it better. I have my CDL, which I got in 1991, and I actually was a trainer for 6 years. Never had to worry about that. Good luck and keep the rubber side down.

jimandlaurie
05-31-2020, 09:03 PM
My license since I was 18 has been a Commercial Driver License. it used to be called a Chauffeur License when I got it in Wyoming originally. I don't think I ever saw a Limo there though, but drove lots of big trucks there.

Chasnracin
06-02-2020, 09:35 AM
Class A CDL for work.

DmaxDually
06-18-2020, 11:10 PM
It's funny, actually it's sad. Here in Florida, if you want to get a job driving a truck with GVW of over 26,000 lbs or articulating trailer you will need to get either a class A or B CDL depending on the truck. To get a CDL it is not cheap. You need to take a class at a certified school, a written test, tests for any endorsement ( air Brakes, Hasmat, etc) plus a road test. You also have to get a medical exam every year and carry your medical certificate with you.
In Florida, I'm guessing because of our large, retired, elderly and snow bird population, RV's are exempt.
So for example if you are a young healthy person who wants to drive a truck for a living you have to go through all this training and testing to get a CDL to drive anything over 26,000 lbs.
But if you are an elderly person with, poor mobility, motor skills, reflexes, eye sight, hearing etc, never drove anything bigger than a car your whole life and you still have a basic drivers license. You can go into any RV dealership and drive out with a 45 Ft class A, diesel pusher RV with no experience or training what so ever...

DebNJim B
06-19-2020, 04:13 AM
It's funny, actually it's sad. Here in Florida, if you want to get a job driving a truck with GVW of over 26,000 lbs or articulating trailer you will need to get either a class A or B CDL depending on the truck. To get a CDL it is not cheap. You need to take a class at a certified school, a written test, tests for any endorsement ( air Brakes, Hasmat, etc) plus a road test. You also have to get a medical exam every year and carry your medical certificate with you.
In Florida, I'm guessing because of our large, retired, elderly and snow bird population, RV's are exempt.
So for example if you are a young healthy person who wants to drive a truck for a living you have to go through all this training and testing to get a CDL to drive anything over 26,000 lbs.
But if you are an elderly person with, poor mobility, motor skills, reflexes, eye sight, hearing etc, never drove anything bigger than a car your whole life and you still have a basic drivers license. You can go into any RV dealership and drive out with a 45 Ft class A, diesel pusher RV with no experience or training what so ever...

I've thought that same thing before and wondered if there shouldn't be some kind of skills exam at least.
I think the key points are the "C" in cdl, and the weight of it all.
My GCVW is under 26000lbs. so even if I was driving commercially I still wouldn't need a cdl. I have seen some huge motorhomes that are pulling trailers two cars stacked up in it that may be pushing that weight over the top, though. Had a young guy on a sit next to us this year with that set up and going full time running his business out of his rig so I suppose that could be called commercial.
I had a cdl for many years. I finally gave it up for two reasons. 1. the cost of the license and physical exam each year. and 2. so my business friends had to stop asking me to help them out with driving. It made it easier to say no.

bigfrank
06-19-2020, 05:22 AM
I think the rv induustry should have a skills test for the large class a motor home to help poeple understand the difference with air brakes and teach basic backing skills I don,t think most poeple buy fifth wheels with out some knowledge of how to pull and back them . Also wih the current virus going around lots of new poeple sre buying RVs it will be interesting in the future if we are able to find spots to stay available just a thought

Bigfrank

BB_TX
06-19-2020, 08:09 AM
I've thought that same thing before and wondered if there shouldn't be some kind of skills exam at least.
I think the key points are the "C" in cdl, and the weight of it all.
My GCVW is under 26000lbs. so even if I was driving commercially I still wouldn't need a cdl. ................

The license requirement, at least in Texas, is based on gross vehicle weight RATING (GVWR), not on scaled weight. Scaled weight may be well under 26,000, but if GVWR is over 26,000 then most states require some higher level non-commercial license.

Are you under 26,000 lbs GVWR since the trailer has a GVWR of over 16,000 lbs and the truck from 10,000 to 11,500 GVWR depending on model?

My older, and shorter, 3075RL has a GVWR of 14,260 lbs. Combined with my F350 GVWR of 11,500 lbs, that puts me at 25,760 lbs, just 240 lbs under the limit.

And along that same line of discussion, I would guess virtually every Montana owner over 38' is over the 26,000 lb limit. And I wonder just how many have actually obtained a class A non-commercial license.

mlh
06-19-2020, 09:36 AM
Safety is the issue here. Are we any safer with everyone that pulls a camper having an up weight license? I have never seen any proof that was true. People in Va don’t seem to be involved in any more accidents than anybody else. I see no real valid reason to give up another freedom.
Lynwood

BB_TX
06-19-2020, 11:13 AM
Everyone has to take a written test and driving test to obtain the right (privilege?) to drive a "normal" size vehicle. And to show that they at least have some knowledge of what is required to safely control that vehicle. It only stands to reason that you would need additional testing to give you the right to operate a much larger heavier vehicle or combination of vehicles. Does testing inherently make a person a safer driver? No. But I think even a poor driver who has shown he/she knows enough to pass the testing requirements will be better than a poor driver who knows nothing about, or could not pass, those requirements. I don't see that as a freedom, but as an earned privilege.

Waricha
06-19-2020, 11:14 AM
I have a CDL B with DOT Medical Card.

JABURKHOLDER
06-19-2020, 01:24 PM
26001 lbs, single or combined gross weight, is the tipping point for CDL requirements. My truck GVWR is 14000 lbs, my RV GVWR is 16960 lbs. Combined that is 30960 lbs. Guess I need a CDL. Or do I ? Here In Ohio, RVís are exempt from CDL requirements. So, even though all you have ever driven your entire life is a Honda Civic, you can go out and buy an F550 and a 45 ft Mobile Estates Rv and drive away with no training or testing, other than what was required to drive your Honda 30 years ago.

Next time youíre cruising down the highway and come across an RV with an Ohio plate, be careful, it might be me, 58 ft of unskilled rolling trouble.

BB_TX
06-19-2020, 02:20 PM
In Texas with a 26,001 lb RV you don’t need a CDL. But you do need a class A non-CDL which requires additional written test plus driving test with the RV.

skypilot
06-19-2020, 02:29 PM
Same in KS - 26001 lbs GCWR (gross combined weight rating) and you need a Class A non-commercial license. At 10,001 GVRW for the RV itself, you also need one. Not a CDL - a non-commercial class A.

AZ Traveler
06-19-2020, 02:39 PM
The best government is the least government.

jeffba
06-19-2020, 07:03 PM
Everyone has to take a written test and driving test to obtain the right (privilege?) to drive a "normal" size vehicle. And to show that they at least have some knowledge of what is required to safely control that vehicle. It only stands to reason that you would need additional testing to give you the right to operate a much larger heavier vehicle or combination of vehicles. Does testing inherently make a person a safer driver? No. But I think even a poor driver who has shown he/she knows enough to pass the testing requirements will be better than a poor driver who knows nothing about, or could not pass, those requirements. I don't see that as a freedom, but as an earned privilege.

Bill, Question after seeing all those that have passed a test to drive a normal sized vehicle, can you honestly say that passing the test makes them all a safer driver? :whistling::hide: Sorry too easy

BB_TX
06-19-2020, 08:10 PM
Bill, Question after seeing all those that have passed a test to drive a normal sized vehicle, can you honestly say that passing the test makes them all a safer driver? :whistling::hide: Sorry too easy

Nope. But they would have to be some increment better than those who couldnít pass the test. And some of those on the road makes you wonder if they have any license at all. :nonono:

DebNJim B
06-19-2020, 09:27 PM
26001 lbs, single or combined gross weight, is the tipping point for CDL requirements. My truck GVWR is 14000 lbs, my RV GVWR is 16960 lbs. Combined that is 30960 lbs. Guess I need a CDL. Or do I ? Here In Ohio, RVís are exempt from CDL requirements. So, even though all you have ever driven your entire life is a Honda Civic, you can go out and buy an F550 and a 45 ft Mobile Estates Rv and drive away with no training or testing, other than what was required to drive your Honda 30 years ago.

Next time youíre cruising down the highway and come across an RV with an Ohio plate, be careful, it might be me, 58 ft of unskilled rolling trouble.

You don't. The key is the "C" in cdl. An RV is not a commercial trailer. I think it really is more about controlling commerce and collecting fees then it is about safety. Seems some states at least require non-cdl's for over 26,000lvs. Is there testing involved it that?

MxBound
06-19-2020, 10:56 PM
I have a class a cdl with all endorsements. I'm going to be buying a single rear axle semi to haul my 20k gvwr toy hauler around.
I gotta look into this E license in NM, for after I retire.
Medical exam involved ?
This is the tractor I'm looking at buying, but his toy hauler.
https://i.postimg.cc/85MmLQbB/20200616_183212.jpg (https://postimg.cc/yg6RzGtk)

DmaxDually
06-20-2020, 08:18 AM
I think it really is more about controlling commerce and collecting fees then it is about safety. Seems some states at least require non-cdl's for over 26,000lvs. Is there testing involved it that?

You're right it's not about safety. Here in Florida we have the highest percentage, in the country, of seniors over 65 living here. They are very politically active.
That is why, I guessing, Florida statute 322.53(2)(d) exempts all RV's from CDL requirement, regardless of weight. If you attempt any legislation negatively restricting or affecting seniors in Florida you political career will be short lived.
All you have to do is just barely pass an eye test to get a regular license. I've seen many elderly people, that were being helped into the DMV by their caretakers, fail the eye test or the person behind the counter "helps" them pass and the person renewed their license because they feel sorry for them.
That's same response you here from people (Awh I feel sorry for them) when you see on the news that an elderly driver plowed into a crowd of people or drives through a store front by mistake because they either got confused and hit the gas instead of the brake or they took the wrong medication..

It's not about safety...because if you are a young health person who wants to drive a truck (26,000 lbs +) or a bus for a living you have to get all this special training, takes tests, get a yearly physical to get a medical card and have to carry a medical card with you at all times.
But if you are 65-80+ years old, have health and mobility issues that effect your motor skills, judgement, reflexes, limited movement of your neck or limbs plus you never drove anything bigger than a Cadillac your whole life. You can get behind the wheel of a 45 ft, class A, diesel pusher RV and head out on the highway with no training or experience what so ever.
Do you get less dead if you get hit by a 45 ft RV than you would if you got hit by a truck or a bus???

I'm in favor of requiring endorsement's to your license like you need for motorcycles. Have 2 separate endorsements that require you to take a class, written test and an on road skills tests. One for Motorhomes ( class A,B & C's) and one endorsement for 5th wheels and all bumper pull trailers.

MxBound
06-20-2020, 09:05 AM
Having a CDL, and seeing drivers of all types, I'm NOT in favor of special licenses, or any more government control.
A class A CDL, doesn't make big truck drivers and smarter or better drivers.
Look at drivers for SWIFT !!
What are the stats for RV accidents by inexperienced drivers, over know it all, long time drivers ?

BB_TX
06-20-2020, 09:16 AM
You don't. The key is the "C" in cdl. An RV is not a commercial trailer. I think it really is more about controlling commerce and collecting fees then it is about safety. Seems some states at least require non-cdl's for over 26,000lvs. Is there testing involved it that?
My weight is just under the limit so I don't have the class A non-CDL. But from what other Texans have said about the non-CDL class A, you have to take a written test along the line of that required for a CDL, and you have to take a driving test with the 5er attached, including backing.

DmaxDually
06-20-2020, 11:04 AM
Having a CDL, and seeing drivers of all types, I'm NOT in favor of special licenses, or any more government control.
A class A CDL, doesn't make big truck drivers and smarter or better drivers.
Look at drivers for SWIFT !!
What are the stats for RV accidents by inexperienced drivers, over know it all, long time drivers ?

From Truck info.net:

What are some accident statistics?
Estimates of 41,000 to 45,000 traffic deaths occur every year within the U.S.. Walkers and bikers account for 15% of the total traffic deaths each year. Fewer than 9% of those deaths involve commercial vehicles. More than 80% of those accidents are the fault of the non-commercial driver. Of those death related accidents only 4% of trucks are fatigue related. Drinking related accounted for .06% of those accidents.

What are some facts about truck driving accidents?
Commercial trucks are involved in 2.4% of all car accidents.
Trucks are 3 times less likely to be in an accident than a regular motor vehicle.

What is the cause of the truck accidents?
More than 75% of truck driving accidents are due to the driver of the passenger vehicle.
Only 16% of all truck driving accidents are due to the truck driverís fault.

From https://fifthwheelst.com/rv-accidents-statistics.html

Most common causes of RV accidents
Although some of these common causes of RV accidents overlap with causes of car accidents, they are exacerbated in an RV where sheer size plus reduced visibility and maneuverability increase the risk factors for a crash.

Inexperienced drivers
Senior drivers
Speeding
High winds
Overtired drivers
Overloading the RV with too much weight
Runaway trailers
Rollover caused by higher center of gravity
Poorly calculated turns
Miscalculated stopping distances (heavy vehicles require longer stopping distances)
Poorly balanced loads
Failing to see another vehicle in the lane beside the RV due to a blind spot

All of these causes are avoidable (except Senior drivers and High winds) with classroom and practical driver training.

jeffba
06-20-2020, 01:28 PM
From Truck info.net:

What are some accident statistics?
Estimates of 41,000 to 45,000 traffic deaths occur every year within the U.S.. Walkers and bikers account for 15% of the total traffic deaths each year. Fewer than 9% of those deaths involve commercial vehicles. More than 80% of those accidents are the fault of the non-commercial driver. Of those death related accidents only 4% of trucks are fatigue related. Drinking related accounted for .06% of those accidents.

What are some facts about truck driving accidents?
Commercial trucks are involved in 2.4% of all car accidents.
Trucks are 3 times less likely to be in an accident than a regular motor vehicle.

What is the cause of the truck accidents?
More than 75% of truck driving accidents are due to the driver of the passenger vehicle.
Only 16% of all truck driving accidents are due to the truck driverís fault.

From https://fifthwheelst.com/rv-accidents-statistics.html

Most common causes of RV accidents
Although some of these common causes of RV accidents overlap with causes of car accidents, they are exacerbated in an RV where sheer size plus reduced visibility and maneuverability increase the risk factors for a crash.

Inexperienced drivers
Senior drivers
Speeding
High winds
Overtired drivers
Overloading the RV with too much weight
Runaway trailers
Rollover caused by higher center of gravity
Poorly calculated turns
Miscalculated stopping distances (heavy vehicles require longer stopping distances)
Poorly balanced loads
Failing to see another vehicle in the lane beside the RV due to a blind spot

All of these causes are avoidable (except Senior drivers and High winds) with classroom and practical driver training.

Taking a test where one of the questions is What year were turn signals made mandiitory, does not improve ones driving skills