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DanandBrenda
07-06-2019, 05:34 AM
Just got home from a short trip to sun lakes in eastern WA. Before we left I checked all tire pressures set at 80 psi. Just before Quincy WA hurd loud boom looked in left mirror to see big piece of side skirting dragging on the road and flat tire. lucky the rest area less than 1/4 mile up the road was able to limp in and put on the spare tire and remove all stuff hanging down dragging. Now buying Sailuns for all 5. Insurance will cover the repairs but have to be without the trailer probably the rest of the summer. Ordered TST 507 tire pressure monitor before we left but didn't show up until 2 days after we left.

RoadRunnerTR21
07-06-2019, 06:22 AM
You were pulling a 3820FK with 80 PSI in the trailer tires? Are your tire E or G? I would think a 40' trailer should have G rated tires with a PSI of 110 not 80.

Arkware
07-06-2019, 07:29 AM
RoadRunner,
Don't be too hard on DanandBrenda.
In 2015-16 (and many other years) the factory was sending out these heavy rigs with 'E' rated tires @ 80 psi.
That is what is listed on the sticker, too...
Some of us just have to be convinced :blush: at how scary this is.

DanandBrenda,
I feel your pain. We were convinced...
Last year, on the way to the Fall Rally, on the interstate, no rest area near by, steel railings 10 ft off the roadway, :eek: and semis rushing by in the near lane. Just lucky the blown tire was on passenger side.
Had to buy a pair of tires at the next stop just to make it to the Rally.

You have made a good choice with the TPMS, now invest in a set of 'G' rated tires. The wheels on your rig should be rated for 110# so you're halfway there.
I can recommend Sailun 637s. A quality tire that is value priced. :thumbsup:

DanandBrenda
07-06-2019, 07:50 AM
You were pulling a 3820FK with 80 PSI in the trailer tires? Are your tire E or G? I would think a 40' trailer should have G rated tires with a PSI of 110 not 80.
Yes E rated tires is what came on it new. the new tires will be G rated 110 psi.

mlh
07-06-2019, 08:18 AM
Tires are always a hot topic in the summer.
If you have the standard ST China Bomb tires on your camper get them off before this happens to you.
Lynwood

DanandBrenda
07-06-2019, 08:36 AM
Found Sailun S 637 235/80R16 at walmart for 130.00 each is this a good deal. just started shopping.

Arkware
07-06-2019, 08:51 AM
That looks very good. Today's price at Simple Tire is $180.99 ea.
You may want to dbl check the 'born-on-date'.

How to info: https://www.tires-easy.com/blog/tire-dot-date-code/

waynemoore
07-06-2019, 08:56 AM
My 3582RL cam with E rated tires. Drove them a whole 7 I think miles to a Discount tire store and replaced them.
Employees at the tire store thought I was crazy to be replacing new tires.

Just now replace that set with Sailun’s.

DQDick
07-06-2019, 09:22 AM
Found Sailun S 637 235/80R16 at walmart for 130.00 each is this a good deal. just started shopping.

Yes, it is.

RoadRunnerTR21
07-06-2019, 09:26 AM
Yes E rated tires is what came on it new. the new tires will be G rated 110 psi.


:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

CalandLinda
07-06-2019, 12:44 PM
Found Sailun S 637 235/80R16 at walmart for 130.00 each is this a good deal. just started shopping.

Just a note to reinforce your LRG choice; under the new RIVA recommended standards for your axles, replacement tires should have a minimum load capacity of 3850# ea.. The Sailun ST235/80R16 LRG provides 4080# of load capacity at 110 PSI and that designated size is your best choice no matter what brand you use.

RichardD
07-06-2019, 01:31 PM
Just remember to check your wheels max PSI rating, which is stamped on the back side of the wheel. Not all wheels (rims) are created equal! A reputable tire store would check the wheel to make sure that the wheel's rating matches the tire rating before mounting or selling them to you.

phillyg
07-07-2019, 09:00 AM
Yep, LR E cheapies are what came with my '16 3711FL. These big FWs need LR G at 110psi. Also, make sure the wheels are rated for 110psi.

WaltBennett
07-07-2019, 03:03 PM
WHY doesn't anyone seem to understand that, yes the E or G rating is important, BUT check your DOT 'born on' date stamps and write them down! There are tons of information by all the tire manufacturers about how tires will degrade over time no matter if their covered or indoors. Nothing but semi trailer tires will be safe with a close to rated load after five or six years.

RoadRunnerTR21
07-07-2019, 03:10 PM
I always check the "born on" date of my tires. Much like I check the age of DEF.

Pat2002
07-14-2019, 01:13 PM
Buy 14 ply tires They handle the weight better . Stay under 65 mph in hot weather. Trailer tires are not rated for 65mph.

Dean A Van Peursem
07-14-2019, 01:22 PM
TPMS does not protect against bad tires. Best to buy LT tires.

jjackflash
07-14-2019, 01:24 PM
Goodyear G614’s the only way to go!

RRman
07-14-2019, 01:35 PM
Check out the "Dry" empty weight of your selected Tires. Tire Rack.com, etc.
I only run Michelin XPS Rib and Bridgestone Duravis R 250 LT tires now.
The heaviest (more rubber) AND most expensive LT tires.
I've also found they very seldom need to be aired up unlike cheaper tires I've had in the past that frequently were down a few pounds every few months.
I've had one Flat due to a nail, and lost one wheel (with the tire) due to some bearing failure. Replacing is expensive, but at least I can't blame the Tires.
My old Big Sky has 6K axles, 80 PSI rims, and weighs just under 14K lbs.

StageCoachDriver
07-14-2019, 02:01 PM
On my new Monty, the tires were set at 80 from the factory, but the recommended pressure on the tire side wall said 95. Checked with dealer and boosted them up to 95 psi. My last trip was about 7,000 miles - no problem.

pyoung47
07-14-2019, 02:42 PM
I wonder if a TPMS would be of much use.in preventing or warning of a blow out. I’ve had three or four, and the noise alerted me.

andrew selkregg
07-14-2019, 02:53 PM
Goodyear G614’s the only way to go!

Ditto on the g614's

hosssmith
07-14-2019, 02:56 PM
The last thing I ever wanted to do again was to get into a tire discussion but I will. Years ago I was at a tire shop that did all of our work at that time including selling us (real) truck tires and capping our carcasses when a pusher pulled up leading an oilfield truck with several Bridgestones in various stages of self destruction. He wanted them warranted and was not in the best of moods.

The tire store manager told him he could not do anything about the tires because they had been sold to the plugging company by Sam's and suggested they limp across town to the Sam's store. They had already been to Sam's and Sam's would do nothing about the tires and told the pusher that he had to goto a Bridgestone dealer for service.

I'll leave out the theatrics and such in the interest of brevity. The short story is yes Sam's sold the Bridgestones but they were built to Sam's cost cutter specs and not built to normal Bridgestone specs and Sam's provided no warranty of any kind on the tires account of the good (read: cheap) price paid for them.

All of which brings up my questions about the cost of tires. I read above that Wal-Mart has one price and Simple Tire has a very different price. Are these the same tires and built to the same specs with the same warranty at both stores and will all tire stores warranty these tires?

While I am on the endless tire subject I will also mention that we stipulate that ALL DOT numbers, which always include the tires' birth date, be displayed on the outside of the tire no matter where it is mounted. In other words the date must always be on the side opposite the bolt holes. For duals one can go under the truck and find the date on the inside tire if needed. This way the age of the tires are always visible no mater on what they are mounted.

~Hoss

D&D Young
07-14-2019, 02:59 PM
I've had several blowouts on trailers/5th wheels I've hauled finding myself changing them along side the highway. Luckily with only minor damage to the plastic fender. I just ordered Boar 19.5 rims and Continental HS3 225/70R19.5 tires. Although they cost me a bundle I'm hoping to avoid anymore blowouts and lesson the chances of a blowout. We are planning a trip to San Antonio TX for the winter then leaving for Alaska middle to late May. Hopefully this is a good investment.

jeffba
07-14-2019, 03:11 PM
Buy 14 ply tires They handle the weight better . Stay under 65 mph in hot weather. Trailer tires are not rated for 65mph.

Sailuns are rated for 75 MPH

Billbored
07-14-2019, 04:49 PM
The tire man said, “Doesn’t matter what you pay for a tire. If it develops a loss of pressure for any reason, it will heat up until it self destructs. The only way to know what’s going on underneath you is with a TPMS.” Makes sense to me after thousands of miles, different brands, and lots of changes on the side of the road. My wife and I are tag team tire changers. After a blowout on a Friday, 5:30PM, I95, downtown Jacksonville, we now have TPMS. Watch it like a hawk. 😎

D&D Young
07-14-2019, 04:55 PM
The tire man said, “Doesn’t matter what you pay for a tire. If it develops a loss of pressure for any reason, it will heat up until it self destructs. The only way to know what’s going on underneath you is with a TPMS.” Makes sense to me after thousands of miles, different brands, and lots of changes on the side of the road. My wife and I are tag team tire changers. After a blowout on a Friday, 5:30PM, I95, downtown Jacksonville, we now have TPMS. Watch it like a hawk. 😎

Tpms will be my next investment before well pull out... Now to figure out which one...

fulltilt
07-14-2019, 05:21 PM
Hi Dan Hi Brenda
This link is to a PDF file produced by Goodyear…it has never let me down, the information found in it, has allowed me to tow tens of thousands of miles without incident, with all types of trailers, in all types of conditions. I use Goodyear “G” rated, on my 5’er, at over 15,000#’s.
If you would allow me to point out a few important points, the pressure listed on the tire is calibrated for 70 degrees F, this is the temperature that many industries use as a basis, not just the tire industry, you extrapolate from there. So for every 10 degrees + or -, outdoor temperature, you have to alter your pressure by 2%. There is also an altitude adjustment but I haven’t felt the need to use that.
Another point or observation that I experienced was that I purchased a set of “G’s” from a Nationwide Tire Retailer in Phoenix, the Goodyear warehouse there was central & allowed me to request “Date Codes” that were not older than 1 year. The retailer did the install, & when I requested what they set the tire pressures at, they told me 90#’s…I told them that was too low, their air system was regulated to 95#’s maximum & couldn’t be raised higher…the Manager told me it was a “legal limitation for insurance”. In the provided link, Goodyear will clearly tell you that 20% below the listed air pressure & they consider the tire “flat”, voiding warranty. I have never relied on tire shops for actual pressures nor wheel torques, I have found them to vary far too often, I am in the habit of checking everything.
Hope this is helpful.

file:///C:\Users\patbr\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INe tCache\IE\DDXFBSMO\tire-care-guide.pdf

fulltilt
07-14-2019, 05:33 PM
Sorry, this is the correct link

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=15&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiH9p76vbXjAhXrxlQKHZIzCukQFjAOegQIABAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.goodyearrvtires.com%2Fpdfs%2 Ftire-care-guide.pdf&usg=AOvVaw2rXpGSZreeMPDAbrAbvKqq

CaptnJohn
07-14-2019, 05:39 PM
Tpms will be my next investment before well pull out... Now to figure out which one...

TST 507,,,, end of story!

D&D Young
07-14-2019, 05:49 PM
TST 507,,,, end of story!

I was looking at the TST 507 and the TireMinder.. Both have good ratings and decent prices. However I have heard good things about the TST507..

rames14
07-14-2019, 05:59 PM
As this is always a “hot topic”, I would like to share my 2 cents worth. We have had three Montana’s over the last 16 years. Our 2005 (bought in 2004) came with Goodyear Marathons, B.C. (Before China). We never had tire problems in the earlier days, and TPMS was just starting. Back then, Doran TPMS would give pressure but not temperature. I bought my first TST brand TPMS with our second Montana and on the first trip with it saw the pressure dropping on a tire. Had a bubble the size of a golf ball on the side of the tire. My TPMS system saved me that time and I am a firm believer in them, regardless of brand. I personally have had great customer service from TST, but there are other good brands. A TPMS system will not catch all tire failures before a blowout. But, it is still peace of mind for me knowing the pressure and temperature of my tires.

Someone mentioned putting LT tires on a 40’ fifth wheel. LT tires are rated under the load rating of the axle. I would not recommend that, but to each their own. The G series tires are, in my opinion, the best bang for the buck. For about the last five years, Montana has put 110 psi rated rims on their units, regardless of whether they came with E or G tires. G rated tires have been an option at least since 2010. Many people did not buy that option, and chances are if you bought it off of the lot, it had E rated tires. The dealers know their customers. Montana started putting G rated tires on standard as a few years ago. Most (not all) members who have upgraded to G series tires fall into either the Goodyear G614 or Sailun camp. I have had both, and last time decided to buy on price and went with the Sailun’s. Both are good tires. The Goodyear will cost you more but are American made. The Sailun’s changed their import code to trailer tire to avoid the tariffs that would be applied if they were listed as a truck tire. So, the Chinese government subsidizes the Sailun tire.

Sorry for the long story, but if you run G series or higher rated tires from a trusted manufacturer, maintain your tire pressure, use TPMS and monitor your tires visually you will probably sleep better at night. Safe travels to all.

mhs4771
07-14-2019, 06:39 PM
I started with a Tire Trakker and it was worth anything. Very good Friends were using the Tire Minder and had a complete Tire Blow-out with nothing left of the tire and their Tire Minder still showed that the pressure was good.
We're both now running the TST 507 and couldn't be happier and it has already alerted me to a tire with a slow leak.

Utahtrapper
07-14-2019, 06:49 PM
I have had 3 GY 614 Blow up in the past 3 years.
So last Monday on my way to Ririe Idaho around Pocatello Boom the 3rd blew.
So when I got to Rexburg stopped into Les Schwab and got 4 new Sailun 235/85/16 they also stated its the most popular Heavy Duty trailer tire.
Had them Balanced and my trailer has never road so smooth. Had them set to 100 psi.
Coming home Friday temps got to 102 degrees so with the 2% rule I was close.
TPMS will be on my next to do list

L0veless
07-14-2019, 06:53 PM
might want to look at your tire size 235/80-R16 when we upgraded from E to G we noticed more options in the 85width and a few dollars less. we did move to the 85, 10,000 miles ago with no issues. just for sh*ts and giggles I did a google price for sailun and "AMAZON" had then for $115.00 never would have thought amazon for tires,

Cowboys Wild Ride
07-14-2019, 07:23 PM
I agree. Mine are 110 on a 3921 FB

beeje
07-14-2019, 07:50 PM
A good friend of mine had a blow out in route to our destination just south of myrtle beach ( from MD) a few weeks ago. It tore up the side of his trailer and ripped the brake magnet wires out of the magnet. This is his second blow out with two different trailers.

I have been telling him for YEARS to get the china bombs off his trailer to no avail.

After this last episode, he finally is starting to get the message.

His trailer is lighter, at 10k gvw. So I suggested Goodyear endurance tires since he has 15" rims.

He bought 5 of those in route after the blow out. And now informs me a TPMS has been ordered.

Sometimes it takes a few good smacks in the head to get the message. LOL

ANYONE TOWING A TRAILER WITH CHEAP ASS CHINESE ST TIRES IS FLERTING WITH DISASTER...………..

jimandlaurie
07-14-2019, 09:24 PM
I'm not sure when Montana made a change, but our 2018 3820fk, came with Sailuns. Boy was I happy , because if there wasn't g614's or equivalent , we were going to have a serious tire exchange before the deal,. I learned that on our first Montana.

Rondo
07-14-2019, 09:32 PM
Bill-- what is the brand name and size rating of your tires. I've never seen any come out with a 95 lb pressure.

CaptnJohn
07-14-2019, 11:05 PM
Bill-- what is the brand name and size rating of your tires. I've never seen any come out with a 95 lb pressure.

I ran 95 in Carlisle LR F on a Cougar a while ago. Great tires.

hosssmith
07-15-2019, 05:23 AM
TPMS >>> Don't leave home without it.

JAWs
07-15-2019, 06:51 AM
Yes E rated tires is what came on it new. the new tires will be G rated 110 psi.
Also to consider, I put 14 ply G rated Hercules on my trailer. They too are to be pressured to 110. But I cant because the stock wheel is not rated for that pressure. For now I'm running 95 psig and in 3 or 4 years when I get new tires, I'll replace the wheels as well.
Not telling you what to do...just thought you may want to dig further.

No one ever thinks about the wheels. They have maximums and ratings to!

jsb5717
07-15-2019, 07:20 AM
Bill-- what is the brand name and size rating of your tires. I've never seen any come out with a 95 lb pressure.

Our 2018 came with Rainier ST235/80R/16F tires. At least they are more accurately rated for our trailer. When I got them home I found they had 100psi in them. I've reduced that to just under 95psi.

So far just short trips. I've told my wife that we will be upgrading before any long trips.

cgeis48
07-16-2019, 10:38 AM
Also to consider, I put 14 ply G rated Hercules on my trailer. They too are to be pressured to 110. But I cant because the stock wheel is not rated for that pressure. For now I'm running 95 psig and in 3 or 4 years when I get new tires, I'll replace the wheels as well.
Not telling you what to do...just thought you may want to dig further.

No one ever thinks about the wheels. They have maximums and ratings to!
How can I tell what the max tire pressure rating is for my wheels?

cgeis48
07-16-2019, 10:40 AM
I have had 3 GY 614 Blow up in the past 3 years.
So last Monday on my way to Ririe Idaho around Pocatello Boom the 3rd blew.
So when I got to Rexburg stopped into Les Schwab and got 4 new Sailun 235/85/16 they also stated its the most popular Heavy Duty trailer tire.
Had them Balanced and my trailer has never road so smooth. Had them set to 100 psi.
Coming home Friday temps got to 102 degrees so with the 2% rule I was close.
TPMS will be on my next to do list
What is the 2% rule?

Utahtrapper
07-16-2019, 11:10 AM
From fulltilt

If you would allow me to point out a few important points, the pressure listed on the tire is calibrated for 70 degrees F, this is the temperature that many industries use as a basis, not just the tire industry, you extrapolate from there. So for every 10 degrees + or -, outdoor temperature, you have to alter your pressure by 2%. There is also an altitude adjustment but I haven’t felt the need to use that.

JAWs
07-16-2019, 02:39 PM
You should be able to find a casting or stamped number on the inside of the wheel that should designate what weight rate and pressure rate the wheel is rated for. My tire guy said my wheels are rated for 3750 in weight and 90 pounds of pressure. The wheels I will get are rated for 3950 / 110.

CalandLinda
07-16-2019, 02:47 PM
From fulltilt

If you would allow me to point out a few important points, the pressure listed on the tire is calibrated for 70 degrees F, this is the temperature that many industries use as a basis, not just the tire industry, you extrapolate from there. So for every 10 degrees + or -, outdoor temperature, you have to alter your pressure by 2%. There is also an altitude adjustment but I haven’t felt the need to use that.

There are two approved sets of government regulations for setting and maintaining recommended cold tire inflation pressures. First is the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). Those standards guide the fitment and inflation pressures for all automotive vehicles, including RV trailers. Second is the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Their rules differ considerably from the FMVSS standards. Therefor, one is not applicable to the other.

The explanation of "cold inflation pressures" is determined by tire down time, meaning they have not been used or in highway service for at least three hours before inflation pressures are adjusted. In the lower 48 cold is cold. The recommended cold inflation pressure provided at 10,000 feet above sea level will still be correct at the vehicle manufacturers placard recommendations. Same for those tires at sea level. Increased inflation pressures acquired while in motion have been factored in during the manufacturing process for each tire. If you must have a specific answer, look-up tire thermodynamics and combine with tire equilibrium.

mtlakejim
07-16-2019, 04:47 PM
Found Sailun S 637 235/80R16 at walmart for 130.00 each is this a good deal. just started shopping.

That's new didn't know wally world had the Sailun brand

mhs4771
07-16-2019, 06:48 PM
Just be careful with those tires from Walmart, while the may carry the Sailun name they may not be the same tires you would buy from a major Tire Dealer, they may be made to a lower spec as dictated by Walmart.

mhs4771
07-16-2019, 06:53 PM
Now for no-good tires. We joined the Big Bang Club yesterday. Traveling West on the Ohio Turn Pike, two miles from the Indiana border: "Boom" Curb side front tires explodes, and it's not a China Bomb, but a Goodyear G114 17.5 "H" rated tire, 4 1/2 years old. TPMS was showing all four tires running within a couple of pounds of each other and temps all very close. So I guess it our turn to see how good Sailuns really are, getting new tires and wheels delivered tomorrow.

mazboy
07-17-2019, 04:59 AM
curious there stage coach driver.


tires say 95psi? what tires are these? E rated tires are 80psi and G rated tires are 110psi.

I guesss you ahve 'f' rated tires? that is something new to me for montana

jsb5717
07-17-2019, 07:06 AM
curious there stage coach driver.


tires say 95psi? what tires are these? E rated tires are 80psi and G rated tires are 110psi.

I guesss you ahve 'f' rated tires? that is something new to me for montana

Yes, "F" rated tires at 95PSI. We talked about tires at our PDI and was told that Keystone was putting better tires on their rigs. They are still Rainier brand. Still wondering what this means for us personally for longevity.

Do "china bombs" get their reputation because manufacturers used under-rated tires that are destined to fail or because they are poorly made? I know this has been discussed at great length so not trying to re-open that one here. It just seems that perhaps the jury is still out on OEM tires that are actually correctly rated for the trailer.

CalandLinda
07-17-2019, 12:59 PM
Do "china bombs" get their reputation because manufacturers used under-rated tires that are destined to fail or because they are poorly made? I know this has been discussed at great length so not trying to re-open that one here. It just seems that perhaps the jury is still out on OEM tires that are actually correctly rated for the trailer.

There are literally millions of China made ST tires of all brands rolling on our freeways and byways. They could not survive this long if they did not meet the DOT inspection criterion. There would be numerous recalls that would remove them from service.

The long standing minimum fitment requirement for RV trailer tires is for them to equal the load capacity of the vehicle certified GAWRs. RV trailer manufacturers have the authority to set GAWRs. Therefore, trailers were fitted with tires that were going to be overloaded when the consumer loaded their trailer to the maximum allowed cargo capacity. It's very difficult to load a RV trailer with the weight distributed evenly across the axles. Those traveling heavy almost always have an axle overloaded or at least a single tire position overloaded. Without any load capacity reserves those overloaded tires were destined to fail, early.

The following reference provides proof of what I say. It's a copy of a picture I took some time ago at an RV show. The axles are certified 5200# by the axle manufacturer. Keystone certified them at 5080# so they could fit ST225/75R15D tires rated at 2540# to those axles. That practice was done by just about every RV trailer manufacturer. Thus, "China Bombs" were established.

http://www.keystoneforums.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1074&pictureid=6489

jsb5717
07-17-2019, 01:22 PM
CalandLinda - thanks, that is basically what I've suspected. It also appears that in 2017 the NHTSA increased the rating requirement for tires applied by the OEM's. I suppose, then, that it's possible that my OEM "F" tires should perform as expected if I keep adequate pressure in them. I'm still a little nervous about it given the "china bomb" horror stories for OEM tires but the combined rating on my tires is just under 16k lbs while my GVWR is 14K lbs.

CalandLinda
07-17-2019, 01:50 PM
CalandLinda - thanks, that is basically what I've suspected. It also appears that in 2017 the NHTSA increased the rating requirement for tires applied by the OEM's. I suppose, then, that it's possible that my OEM "F" tires should perform as expected if I keep adequate pressure in them. I'm still a little nervous about it given the "china bomb" horror stories for OEM tires but the combined rating on my tires is just under 16k lbs while my GVWR is 14K lbs.

About 98% of the RV trailer manufacturers are members of the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA). RVIA recommended a 10% load capacity reserve above vehicle certified GAWRs for RV trailer tires. All new models from major manufacturers will be equipped with tires that meet the RVIA tire load capacity recommendation.

The FMVSS standards have not changed.

The end result has a sort of a trickle down effect on future replacements because U.S. tire industry standards require replacement tires to provide a load capacity equal to the Original Equipment tires.

CaptnJohn
07-17-2019, 03:30 PM
CalandLinda - thanks, that is basically what I've suspected. It also appears that in 2017 the NHTSA increased the rating requirement for tires applied by the OEM's. I suppose, then, that it's possible that my OEM "F" tires should perform as expected if I keep adequate pressure in them. I'm still a little nervous about it given the "china bomb" horror stories for OEM tires but the combined rating on my tires is just under 16k lbs while my GVWR is 14K lbs.

Remember, the tires with the best reputation is Sailun. They are reasonably priced and made in China.

jsb5717
07-17-2019, 05:12 PM
Now I'm just being a devil's advocate but I'm wondering how an "E" rated Sailun tire, made in China, would perform on a 14K GVWR trailer as compared to the OEM China made "E" rated tire. Would it become a "china bomb"?

They have a great reputation but have been purchased after the OEM fails. The failed under-rated tire is replaced by a Sailun "G" tire which performs great and develops a great reputation. Is it because it is over-rated for most trailers? I'm just curious. Would a Rainier (or another OEM brand) "G" tire perform as well as a Sailun "G" tire? Or is Sailun just built better?

Asked a different way...If the manufactures had been using "G" tires of any brand for the past few years would "china bombs" have even become a thing?

No response necessary. I'm just thinking out loud.

mhs4771
07-17-2019, 07:06 PM
Sailuns are made in at least 3 Countries that I've seen labeled on their tires: China, Korea, and Vietnam. But following different forums, there have been more failures on Goodyear G614s and G114s then any Sailun. I just had a 4 year old G114 explode with no warning other than the BIG BOOM.

Creeker
07-17-2019, 07:14 PM
China Bombs go back much further than a few years jsb.

They earned that reputation the old fashioned way. Among the worst tires to ever hit the asphalt were China made ST tires. For decades! Not just a few years.

I've had them blow on rv's, boat trailers and equipment trailers over the years. All rated at or above the load they were carrying. They were/are truly junk.

I swore off them many years ago. The one and only China made tire I'll even consider is the Sailun S637 and that's for the sole reason of many good reviews from our members here.

Utahtrapper
07-17-2019, 07:19 PM
On the GY G614's I have had 2 tires delaminate the center tread busting up fenders but still holding air and this week on Monday the first true blowout all the way thru like a grenade.
I usually only run 65 give or take a mph or 2. My thought is heat is what GY G614 really cannot handle. JMO

DanandBrenda
07-19-2019, 04:53 AM
Got my sailun tires from Amazon for 119 dollars a piece. They came today and had stickers from simple tire on them.

prndl
07-19-2019, 08:56 AM
Just got back from a 4500 mile trip from So Cal thru New Mexico up thru Colorado to South Dakota across Wyoming to Idaho down thru Nevada and home. Most of the time traveling at 70 or 75 where the speed limit was 70 or 80. All told I have over 17000 miles on my Sailuns. Very little wear other than the outer edges on all four tires. Happy.

Utahtrapper
07-19-2019, 09:22 AM
Got my sailun tires from Amazon for 119 dollars a piece. They came today and had stickers from simple tire on them.

Very Good you bought the 235/80/16's correct?
What was the Build date on the tires

Texan
07-19-2019, 12:47 PM
Just received a 235/85/16 Sailun spare today from Amazon that had a Simple Tire sticker on it for 125.34 including tax.The dot build date was 13-19 so it was built 16 weeks ago. I've bought all my Sailun's before from Simple Tire but they were higher than Amazon this time.

Golfmedik
07-29-2019, 12:16 PM
I have been one of the ones with a G614 failure,,,during the winter with NO heat involved. It was in January of '18 with a 16 month old tire, on the off door side, with a TPMS and a Georgia State Trooper right behind me. GY stepped up and paid half the retail price for the tire after having to take it to a Goodyear Truck Tire dealer. I was happy they offered to pay, however Sailun will NOT do that. That being said, when these tires are used up or nearing out of date, Sailun tires will be going on my rig. I Carry two spares everywhere I go and the second one is a Sailun now. After years of being on many different forums of trucks and RVs, Sailun has almost cornered the market a with a reliable tire. I just upgraded my axles under my rig after several longs discussions with the spring packs and how they looked, so as soon as I can, I will be upgrading wheels to a #4400 pound variety as well. So the Sailuns will be a good fit for my rig.
That being said, I still believe any tire at any time can let go. With our roads today, God only knows what they've ran over while rolling.

CalandLinda
07-29-2019, 03:27 PM
I have been one of the ones with a G614 failure,,,during the winter with NO heat involved. It was in January of '18 with a 16 month old tire, on the off door side, with a TPMS and a Georgia State Trooper right behind me. GY stepped up and paid half the retail price for the tire after having to take it to a Goodyear Truck Tire dealer. I was happy they offered to pay, however Sailun will NOT do that. That being said, when these tires are used up or nearing out of date, Sailun tires will be going on my rig. I Carry two spares everywhere I go and the second one is a Sailun now. After years of being on many different forums of trucks and RVs, Sailun has almost cornered the market a with a reliable tire. I just upgraded my axles under my rig after several longs discussions with the spring packs and how they looked, so as soon as I can, I will be upgrading wheels to a #4400 pound variety as well. So the Sailuns will be a good fit for my rig.
That being said, I still believe any tire at any time can let go. With our roads today, God only knows what they've ran over while rolling.

This is not a pro/con post. Just useful info for you and others in this load capacity range.

The LT235/85R16 LRG G614 RST steel cased tires provide a maximum load capacity of 3750# @ 110 PSI. Under the new recommended guidelines from RVIA they would not be on 7000# vehicle certified axles because they do not provide 10% in load capacity reserves above the 7000# axles maximum allowed load.

Size wise, there are few acceptable replacements for 7000# vehicle certified axles. I don't do brands when more than one is available. Here is a short list.

ST235/80R16 LRG = 4080# @ 110 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST235/85R16 LRF = 3970# @ 95 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST235/86R16 LRG = 4400# @ 110 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST255/85R16 LRE = 4080# @ 80 PSI - from the GY load inflation chart.

For a real beefy tire there is the 215/75R17.5 LRG low platform trailer tires rated at 4805# @ 125 PSI. That's also from the Sailun S637 line-up.

Golfmedik
07-30-2019, 03:03 AM
This is not a pro/con post. Just useful info for you and others in this load capacity range.

The LT235/85R16 LRG G614 RST steel cased tires provide a maximum load capacity of 3750# @ 110 PSI. Under the new recommended guidelines from RVIA they would not be on 7000# vehicle certified axles because they do not provide 10% in load capacity reserves above the 7000# axles maximum allowed load.

Size wise, there are few acceptable replacements for 7000# vehicle certified axles. I don't do brands when more than one is available. Here is a short list.

ST235/80R16 LRG = 4080# @ 110 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST235/85R16 LRF = 3970# @ 95 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST235/86R16 LRG = 4400# @ 110 PSI - from the Sailun load inflation chart.
ST255/85R16 LRE = 4080# @ 80 PSI - from the GY load inflation chart.

For a real beefy tire there is the 215/75R17.5 LRG low platform trailer tires rated at 4805# @ 125 PSI. That's also from the Sailun S637 line-up.

Precisely why I upgraded the axles and will be going with the LRG Sailuns in the 85 series. I'm just going to have to swap the wheels when I do as they are still rated at #3750 IIRC. One of the forum members just had a GY G114 17.5" le go on his rig and did a lot of damage. Of course, we have no idea what the rig ran over or if in fact it was a failure as road hazards happen. One of the main complaints of the 17.5s is that the trailer has a much more stiff ride and things inside get moved around a bit more. However, more and more rigs are coming with 17.5s on them.