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Home away from home
06-20-2019, 05:35 AM
Just purchased new sailun s637 tires for our 2013 3100rl and not sure and there has been many post on this about tire pressure I know that most people run them at 110 psi,on other forums the people focus on the wight caring capacity and the reserve and use a formula to figure out tire pressure . I am confused by this I thought most run them at 110 .so I am asking for a little guidance with tire pressure thoughts as we are about to be on the road for a bit thanks for any and all help with this.

Bob

Slow Hand
06-20-2019, 06:11 AM
110 is the recommended tire pressure from the manufacturer. So you need to have the correct wheels that can hold that much air pressure. I have a 03 with 80 PSI wheels so I cant use those tires. The manufacture has figured and tested all tires they make for all road conditions that is how they come up with the recommended tire pressure. The manufacturer has also given the max load the tire can hold with the 110 PSI. Anything under the max air PSI lowers the load the tire can carry. The max load is stamped on the sidewall along with date and tire size max PSI.

Theunz
06-20-2019, 07:00 AM
You can go to Sailuns web site and see an inflation chart showing psi for different weights for your particular tire. He Sailuns sidewalls are very stiff, so I'm not sure that running 10 or so pounds less would make much difference in the ride.

Home away from home
06-20-2019, 08:43 AM
110 is the recommended tire pressure from the manufacturer. So you need to have the correct wheels that can hold that much air pressure. I have a 03 with 80 PSI wheels so I cant use those tires. The manufacture has figured and tested all tires they make for all road conditions that is how they come up with the recommended tire pressure. The manufacturer has also given the max load the tire can hold with the 110 PSI. Anything under the max air PSI lowers the load the tire can carry. The max load is stamped on the sidewall along with date and tire size max PSI.

thank you for the quick reply I have checked the wheels and the are stamped 110 psi .I was worried about this too so checked it out in past threads it has been posted that keystone stated to put on g wheel on most models in 2012 so i thought i had a 50/50 chance and got lucky thanks for the info that sounds like thats what I need to do

DQDick
06-20-2019, 12:26 PM
I run mine between 105 and 110# since we were we go we experience a lot of different altitudes and temperatures and this keeps me in the proper range without having to make a lot of changes.

Home away from home
06-20-2019, 02:08 PM
Thanks DQ Dick I wasn't real sure as there seams to be as many opinions on this, as there is tire brands between the wheels psi and the tire psi. wifey is as nervous as a long tail cat in a room of rocking chairs about all of this as the does not seam to be one sure correct answer to all of this info . again thanks for the input as it helps me with a starting place. Bob

DQDick
06-20-2019, 02:22 PM
You're welcome! Also, for both you and your wife's peace of mind be sure to get a good tire pressure monitoring system. I use TST 507 flow thrus. TST because of their customer service and flow thrus because I'm lazy and it's hard enough for me to get down there and I don't want to spend any more time than I have too.

CalandLinda
06-20-2019, 05:26 PM
First, I’ll have to ask this question. What size Sailun tires have you installed?

The inflation pressure on the tire sidewall IS NOT a recommendation. It’s the amount of cold inflation pressure necessary for the tire to provide its maximum load capacity. That maximum load capacity is also shown on the tire sidewall.

In accordance with tire industry standards, replacement tires MUST provide a load capacity equal to or greater than the Original Equipment tires provided.

If you are replacing ST235/80R16 LRE tires with ST235/80R16 LRG tires they are both the same designated size. The only major difference is the LRG will provide much more load capacity. The correct inflation pressure for them will start at 80 PSI with optional increases all the way to 110 PSI. A tire load inflation chart for that designated size works at all load range levels or in increments in between load ranges. IMO you’re wasting your money if you do not provide at least 15% in load capacity reserves above the vehicle certified GAWR.

The ST235/85R16 is a “plus sized” tire when used to replace a ST235/80R16 tire . A load inflation chart for that designated size will be needed to establish a new recommended cold inflation pressure as a starting point. Once established, you can then figure-out what PSI is needed to gain the 15% in load capacity reserves.

Snoopy
06-26-2019, 02:03 PM
They do have 235/80r16G for our trailers.

Scid
06-26-2019, 02:21 PM
I do not have YOUR brand tire. I have Goodyear G614s. I called GY and they said the 110 is the MAX and asked how much weight is on each tire. From that information they told me to run 95 PSI. Use the pressure on the chart that matches your weights on your tires.

And an absolute 2nd to the suggestion of a good tire monitor system, and I too use TST 507. Peace of mind.

kenb
06-26-2019, 04:17 PM
First, I very much appreciate this forum. We've had our Monty for about 5 months. You all have taught me so many great things as we get started in the RV world.
I put G rated all-steel belted tires on my Montana 2850FK. I checked the Monty's alloy wheel and the stamp says 110 lbs. I had four MasterTrack st235/80r16 UN-All Steel ST Trailer Radial Tires installed. Not sure how these compare to the Sailuns that you all talk about. So far I have put about 4300 miles on the the MasterTracks. They are rated to inflate at 110 lbs cold, but at that pressure they run 123 lbs hot. That pressure hot is probable ok for the wheels but I wanted to back down a little. I tried 103 lbs cold which yielded 113 lbs hot, and they were HOT to touch (because they flex more at the lower pressure and flex creates friction and heat). I settled on 107 lbs cold and they run about 115 hot with less heat than at the lower pressure. I am sure my experiment is affected by the heat of the pavement on a given day, but I tried to match conditions - mostly. With the sorry shape of the some of the highways I feel more comfortable with the steel belted G rated tires.
One more thought: I found that not all gas station air compressors can push 110 lbs. At one gas station I tried to put a little more air in my tires and it simply was not working. I discovered that my tires where pushing air into the gas station air tank - not good!

CaptnJohn
06-26-2019, 05:59 PM
Sailun provides a chart down to 80psi for lighter trailers or lighter wheels. Have had them on 3 5ers without a problem.

CalandLinda
06-26-2019, 10:39 PM
First, I very much appreciate this forum. We've had our Monty for about 5 months. You all have taught me so many great things as we get started in the RV world.
I put G rated all-steel belted tires on my Montana 2850FK. I checked the Monty's alloy wheel and the stamp says 110 lbs. I had four MasterTrack st235/80r16 UN-All Steel ST Trailer Radial Tires installed. Not sure how these compare to the Sailuns that you all talk about. So far I have put about 4300 miles on the the MasterTracks. They are rated to inflate at 110 lbs cold, but at that pressure they run 123 lbs hot. That pressure hot is probable ok for the wheels but I wanted to back down a little. I tried 103 lbs cold which yielded 113 lbs hot, and they were HOT to touch (because they flex more at the lower pressure and flex creates friction and heat). I settled on 107 lbs cold and they run about 115 hot with less heat than at the lower pressure. I am sure my experiment is affected by the heat of the pavement on a given day, but I tried to match conditions - mostly. With the sorry shape of the some of the highways I feel more comfortable with the steel belted G rated tires.
One more thought: I found that not all gas station air compressors can push 110 lbs. At one gas station I tried to put a little more air in my tires and it simply was not working. I discovered that my tires where pushing air into the gas station air tank - not good!

Just a little info for thought. To provide the recommended 10% in load capacity reserves from your current tires the minimum cold inflation pressure should be maintained at 100 PSI. 110 PSI would be best.

Servicing your tires at a service station is not recommended. The tires will be warm from the trip to the station.

mazboy
06-27-2019, 06:07 AM
What? Do what is listed on the tire: 110psi. Ok, do 100psi.



Just make sure your wheels are rated for this psi

penra
06-27-2019, 09:46 PM
First, I very much appreciate this forum. We've had our Monty for about 5 months. You all have taught me so many great things as we get started in the RV world.
I put G rated all-steel belted tires on my Montana 2850FK. I checked the Monty's alloy wheel and the stamp says 110 lbs. I had four MasterTrack st235/80r16 UN-All Steel ST Trailer Radial Tires installed. Not sure how these compare to the Sailuns that you all talk about. So far I have put about 4300 miles on the the MasterTracks. They are rated to inflate at 110 lbs cold, but at that pressure they run 123 lbs hot. That pressure hot is probable ok for the wheels but I wanted to back down a little. I tried 103 lbs cold which yielded 113 lbs hot, and they were HOT to touch (because they flex more at the lower pressure and flex creates friction and heat). I settled on 107 lbs cold and they run about 115 hot with less heat than at the lower pressure. I am sure my experiment is affected by the heat of the pavement on a given day, but I tried to match conditions - mostly. With the sorry shape of the some of the highways I feel more comfortable with the steel belted G rated tires.
One more thought: I found that not all gas station air compressors can push 110 lbs. At one gas station I tried to put a little more air in my tires and it simply was not working. I discovered that my tires where pushing air into the gas station air tank - not good!

I was wondering about how to get that kind of pressure. I'm looking at for a portable compressor that is suitable and won't take all day to get to 110#. ViAir has some offerings that might work but pricey. Any ideas?

kenb
06-28-2019, 05:52 AM
@penra. I go to the truck stops. Their repair shops have the higher pressure compressors. Some trucks stops also offer a diesel fill lane that also have an 'automatic' air fill service but I have not tried that service.

CalandLinda
06-28-2019, 10:20 AM
@penra. I go to the truck stops. Their repair shops have the higher pressure compressors. Some trucks stops also offer a diesel fill lane that also have an 'automatic' air fill service but I have not tried that service.

Truckers tire inflation pressures are calculated differently than automotive tires. Our RV trailer tires require them to be in what is called a cold condition when inflated to their recommended cold PSI settings. That means they have been sitting for at least 3 hours. Any time a warm tire is inflated it needs to be adjusted/reinflated to the proper cold inflation PSI after it has sit for three hours.

Rick Seely
06-28-2019, 11:29 AM
I use the Viair 400P RV and can get 110 psi with no problem and in a short time frame.
Keep an eye on Amazon prices as they have lowered the price at times.
Rick

beeje
07-07-2019, 06:47 AM
fyi. my 2011 unit has 110 psi wheels on it.

WeBeFulltime
07-07-2019, 07:02 AM
Truckers tire inflation pressures are calculated differently than automotive tires. Our RV trailer tires require them to be in what is called a cold condition when inflated to their recommended cold PSI settings. That means they have been sitting for at least 3 hours. Any time a warm tire is inflated it needs to be adjusted/reinflated to the proper cold inflation PSI after it has sit for three hours.

All tires should be inflated to the desired pressure while COLD. Makes no difference what the tire is on. Truck, trailer, motorcycle, kids bike, etc makes no difference.

mtlakejim
07-07-2019, 10:27 AM
All tires should be inflated to the desired pressure while COLD. Makes no difference what the tire is on. Truck, trailer, motorcycle, kids bike, etc makes no difference.

This is one reason that the tire pressure monitors are so essential. You can monitor the pressures and temp trends on your tires both hot and cold so you know what the tire pressure should run under "normal" operating conditions (IE: when they are hot). That way you know if you need to add a couple pounds of pressure to one or not.

One other thing I also do is make the rounds and touch the bearings with my hand or laser temp them at every stop. Not a bad idea to also take out your phone and use reverse camera to look at the springs at least once a day....

bigred715
07-17-2019, 09:58 PM
We have the ST 235-85-16 tires on our 3000RK which is one of smallest trailers Montana has made. I started out at 100PSI and didn't like the bouncing so I have dropped the pressure to 90PSI. GVW on my trailer is about 14,000 and have 9760# on my trailer wheels.

CaptnJohn
07-17-2019, 10:05 PM
There is a difference ~~~ the 80 is rated at 4080 and 85 is rated at 4400 at 110 psi. 80s came on my new 5er and I’ll switch to 85 when due to be replaced. I run both at 105. Put 85 on my last Montana.

CalandLinda
07-18-2019, 03:55 AM
We have the ST 235-85-16 tires on our 3000RK which is one of smallest trailers Montana has made. I started out at 100PSI and didn't like the bouncing so I have dropped the pressure to 90PSI. GVW on my trailer is about 14,000 and have 9760# on my trailer wheels.

Are those LRG tires?

bigred715
07-18-2019, 07:11 AM
I believe they are load range G tires. They are Sailun tires.