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View Full Version : Comparing Tires, just an opinion


Pocketlake1
10-25-2018, 09:58 AM
I've read the tire posts for the last 3 years and realize lots of opinions, some very passionate about manufacturer, ST vs LT, etc. Wanted to share my experience
Started with factory Tow Masters, which i'm sure some will refer to as China Bombs, but we made trips from Fla to Mich UP and also Alaska with no issues, so put about 20K miles before a blow, and I believe that was due to under inflation, accidentally running only 60psi when rated for 80.

I did a lot of listening and considering about going to LT's, but ended up purchasing a set of Goodyear Endurance last year. (yes, already how the Goodyear haters opinion will be on that) Have made trips from Fla to Nova Scotia and just returned from a great trip to Utah, so only have a little less than 15K on this set, but believe the Endurance is a pretty good ST.

I think what i consider our success so far is due to 2 things: I am religious about tire pressure now, and keep mine at 75 psi. When we were just in 17 degree weather at Bryce Canyon and heading to Arches, made sure with that cold temp i had them at 75

Also speed, the ST's i have are rated for only 60 MPH and that's what i drive on the highway. Get to my destination a little later, but keeps within the limits of the tire speed, and I'm delighted with the 13 mpg we get on our trips

All that being said, good chance i will go to LT's when i get a new set. No down side, plenty of upside and it only raises the trailer height by probably less than 2 inches

ps: loved the Utah parks, people and weather and now back home in Fla sweating, but happy it's only 85 right now and not 95
Safe Travels
Ken

mlh
10-25-2018, 10:08 AM
I’ve been here since 2004 so I’ve seen a lot of tire problems. It’s my opinion you are a lucky man.
Lynwood

CalandLinda
10-25-2018, 10:28 AM
I've read the tire posts for the last 3 years and realize lots of opinions, some very passionate about manufacturer, ST vs LT, etc. Wanted to share my experience
Started with factory Tow Masters, which i'm sure some will refer to as China Bombs, but we made trips from Fla to Mich UP and also Alaska with no issues, so put about 20K miles before a blow, and I believe that was due to under inflation, accidentally running only 60psi when rated for 80.

I did a lot of listening and considering about going to LT's, but ended up purchasing a set of Goodyear Endurance last year. (yes, already how the Goodyear haters opinion will be on that) Have made trips from Fla to Nova Scotia and just returned from a great trip to Utah, so only have a little less than 15K on this set, but believe the Endurance is a pretty good ST.

I think what i consider our success so far is due to 2 things: I am religious about tire pressure now, and keep mine at 75 psi. When we were just in 17 degree weather at Bryce Canyon and heading to Arches, made sure with that cold temp i had them at 75

You should always insure your tires are inflated to the vehicle manufacturer's recommended cold inflation pressures found on the tire placard and in the vehicle owner's manual.

Also speed, the ST's i have are rated for only 60 MPH and that's what i drive on the highway. Get to my destination a little later, but keeps within the limits of the tire speed, and I'm delighted with the 13 mpg we get on our trips Your new GY Endurance tires all have speed rating letters which are higher than 75 MPH./COLOR]

All that being said, good chance i will go to LT's when i get a new set. No down side, plenty of upside and it only raises the trailer height by probably less than 2 inches [COLOR="blue"]Replacement tires need to have a load capacity equal to or greater than the OE tires. There are no 16" LT tires in LRE that qualify to replace LRE ST tires.

ps: loved the Utah parks, people and weather and now back home in Fla sweating, but happy it's only 85 right now and not 95
Safe Travels
Ken

See blue above.

dieselguy
10-25-2018, 11:58 AM
I beg to differ on the cold inflation pressure as it is a max pressure to max load. Use a load chart for the tire and sometimes you'll find that max rough riding pressure isn't needed. You will need to weigh your fiver loaded for a trip however. For example, if I run my TV rear tires to pressure on the door sticker ... it wears the centers of my tires well before the edges. If I drop that pressure 5 psi ... the rear tires wear evenly. I also beg to differ about the use of LT tires ... many of us run them with no issue. Many of us never come near being what the max allowed fully loaded weight is stamped on the side placard. Our LT tires handle our weight within spec.

1retired06
10-25-2018, 02:33 PM
Ran LT TransForce Firestones for many years with no issues at 65MPH. Running at 75-80MPH, need the best G load tire you can afford.

CalandLinda
10-25-2018, 04:09 PM
I beg to differ on the cold inflation pressure as it is a max pressure to max load. Use a load chart for the tire and sometimes you'll find that max rough riding pressure isn't needed. You will need to weigh your fiver loaded for a trip however. For example, if I run my TV rear tires to pressure on the door sticker ... it wears the centers of my tires well before the edges. If I drop that pressure 5 psi ... the rear tires wear evenly. I also beg to differ about the use of LT tires ... many of us run them with no issue. Many of us never come near being what the max allowed fully loaded weight is stamped on the side placard. Our LT tires handle our weight within spec.


I don't post about what people do that work for them. I just report on how things are supposed to be done. Inflating tires installed under the guidance of regulations and standards for commercial use is not applicable to vehicles certified from FMVSS. Besides that, inflating tires to the load carried would require a weight slip every time the load changes.


Under FMVSS guidance, the correct inflation pressures for your vehicle's tires - OE tires - are found on the vehicle certification label, tire placard and in the vehicle owner's manual (a mandate). Deviations, if any, will be found in the vehicle owner's manual. (In fact, your tire placard will refer you to the owner's manual).


Using LT tires - other than those marked RST - to replace Original Equipment tires is considered a major deviation in tire design and considered a misapplication.

CalandLinda
10-25-2018, 04:18 PM
Ran LT TransForce Firestones for many years with no issues at 65MPH. Running at 75-80MPH, need the best G load tire you can afford.


Keystone used a lot of Original Equipment LT tires in model years 2005-2006. However, that only applied to the vehicles the tires were fitted to.

The federal certification label is the guide to check for tire design. What's on that label is the official tire design for that trailer, unless, Keystone had an optional equipment authorization list. Anything on such a list would have to be installed before first sale for it to comply with certification regulations for certification modification.

1retired06
10-25-2018, 06:57 PM
I would have been a fool to run with the marathon and other OEMs that came on our last three rigs. Particularly on the 2015, absolutely crap tires. Refused to close the deal until all five tires swapped out on dealers dime with tires I chose.

mlh
10-25-2018, 07:27 PM
Sailum cost about what your standard China Bomd tires and are cheaper than many LT tires. They are proven, give no trouble. I can’t figure why anyone would not buy them. If you like to gamble with out a pay off get the standard ST tires. That may cost you thousands but it’s your camper and your vacation.
Lynwood

CalandLinda
10-25-2018, 08:17 PM
I would have been a fool to run with the marathon and other OEMs that came on our last three rigs. Particularly on the 2015, absolutely crap tires. Refused to close the deal until all five tires swapped out on dealers dime with tires I chose.


Did the dealer have the trailer's federal certification label changed to reflect the new tire size? They could only do that if authorized by Keystone. If they did not change the certification label they sold you a vehicle with a fraudulent federal certification label.


The FMVSS standard clearly states the tires on the trailer MUST be the same size as those depicted on the certification label at the time of first sale.


A tire size ST235/80R16 LRE is the same size as the LRG. Load ranges are not part of the tire size. On the other side, a LT235/85R16 LRG (RST) being a trailer tire and with more load capacity than the LRE would still require a new certification label because it's a different size and uses a different load inflation chart. The dealer could only change the certification label for a vehicle manufacturer authorized option.

BuilderBob
10-25-2018, 09:08 PM
Do we need to get out the pop corn:popcorn:

mhs4771
10-26-2018, 07:37 AM
Arm Chair Lawyer??

My understanding on tires is that you can go to a better higher rated tires, but not a lesser tire. A good tire shop should not install tires with a lesser rating than on the RV label, but they can install tires that exceed said ratings.
That's what I have done, went from "E" China Bombs to "G" GY 614s, next unit I went from the OEM "Gs" to "H" GY 114s and I haven't been arrested yet.

mazboy
10-26-2018, 09:39 AM
Amazing how there still is discussion on tires for 'our' big trailers.


The answer was answered awhile ago. 'G' rated or on the new trailers even a 'H' rated trailer tires. Seems like it is Goodyear or Saliun.

CalandLinda
10-26-2018, 01:19 PM
Arm Chair Lawyer??

My understanding on tires is that you can go to a better higher rated tires, but not a lesser tire. A good tire shop should not install tires with a lesser rating than on the RV label, but they can install tires that exceed said ratings.
That's what I have done, went from "E" China Bombs to "G" GY 614s, next unit I went from the OEM "Gs" to "H" GY 114s and I haven't been arrested yet.


Kudos to you for your tire upgrade selections. They are both trailer tires.

We, that tow RV trailers, do not have the full support of the RV manufacturing community when it comes to tire selections and replacements. Unlike the automotive industry we do not have listings of tire brands, designs, sizes Ė including plus sizes Ė preapproved by RV builders. The common term used in almost all RV trailer ownerís manuals Ė in this instance Iím using Keystoneís - is, ďTo maintain tire safety, purchase new tires that are the same size as the vehicleís original tires or another size recommended by the manufacturer.Ē Without the trailer manufacturerís recommendation we are all out on a limb when it comes to any repairs connected to tire applications.

As another has pointed out, why the continued dialog about tires. Changes in size, design and the numerous advancements in tire technology warrants continued attention. Itís not uncommon anymore to find RV trailers with 8000# axles. The off shore trailer tire manufacturers are head and shoulders above all others in providing the necessary sizes and load capacities for all trailer sizes.

There are good and bad reps on tires from over there, somewhere. When GY developed the steel cased RST tires they were highly touted and better satisfied the needs of the 7000# axles. The off shore tire builders saw the success and mimicked the GY tire, soon they converted it to an ST design and became one of the most popular ST tire manufacturers from over there (Sailun). The band wagon started to get very large and now more than a dozen ST manufacturers build at least two sizes of the very same steel cased tire with various brand names, Carlisle comes to mind. Now there is a new size on the market. An all steel ST225/75R15 LRF. Currently made over there but soon to be made in NC.

RVIA made an astonishing recommendation that will effect the Original Equipment tires on RVs for years, or until NHTSA gets off their duff and makes it official. About 95% of all RV trailer manufacturers belong to RVIA. Their recommendation is for all RV OE tire fitments to have a minimum of 10% in load capacity reserves above vehicle certified GAWRs. They also recommended that RV trailer manufacturers suspend the use of bias ply tires on all wheels larger than 14Ē.

A final note. Tire industry standards require replacements to be of the same size as the OE tires, or larger, and they MUST have a load capacity equal to the OE tires or greater than, via inflation. That statement is like stepping stones, you must use all of them to get to the top. (it needs more context).

NOTE: A tire sized ST225/75R15 LRD is the same size as ST225/75R15 LRE. The load range is not part of a tireís designated size. Both load ranges use the same load inflation chart and carry the same load at 65 PSI. The LRE has the advantage of having the capability of providing more load capacity when inflated to something from 65 PSI to 80 PSI.

Pocketlake1
10-26-2018, 05:43 PM
Facinatng. I started this thread and thought the the word "tire" would generate a lot of passion and also very informative replies which it has. I have learned a lot from this string, particularly about the LRE, which is useful for future tire purchases. I stayed with the ST tires and don't believe I have been lucky, rather prudent, with how I have managed the tires while traveling. the sticker on my rig says 80psi and I run 75. Served me well, along with keeping my highway speed down. Don't want to have to change rims, etc to go to Gs and Hs. Still think it would be prudent to eventually go to a LT that fits my rims and axles, and has a lot of spec buffer built in since they are designed to carry people in trucks, and I think probably safer, and will fit on my rig. I appreciate all the comments and insight since I still believe tires are the most critical item on the rig.

Texan
10-26-2018, 10:40 PM
The side wall is stronger on a ST tire than on a LT tire. With the side pressure on sides of tires especially when making sharp turns forward or backward it is important to keep ST tires on rv's. Just because people don't have problems with LT tires on rv's doesn't mean it's better. Most tire experts recommend maximum tire inflation on rv's so as the tires will run cooler. The only advantage to less than maximum pressure is a little better ride but not a good trade off for running cooler. Under inflation is the no. 1 problem with tires and very important to have tire monitoring system on all rv tires.

mlh
10-27-2018, 07:28 AM
What hasn’t been discussed here is the LT tires have a higher built on reserve than the standard ST tires. They are rated to carry the same weight but since LT tires carry people the safety factor is higher. If you weight the two you will find the LT are heavier than standard ST tires. All that extra weight gives that extra reserve.
If you do a search here you will find this has all been discussed many times over the years. People think if they run some magic PSI and some magic speed their standard ST tires will serve them well only to have a blowout that does thousands of dollars damage to their camper, but it’s your camper.
Lynwood

DanandBrenda
10-27-2018, 08:31 AM
Here is a good place to get tire info. http://www.rvtiresafety.net/

CalandLinda
10-27-2018, 08:38 AM
What hasnít been discussed here is the LT tires have a higher built on reserve than the standard ST tires. If it's not documented it's not usable. Can you show valid documentation? They are rated to carry the same weight but since LT tires carry people the safety factor is higher. All DOT certified highway tires can carry people. If you weight the two you will find the LT are heavier than standard ST tires. Not applicable, different construction and almost always deeper treads on all LT tires. All that extra weight gives that extra reserve. Extra reserves, as you call it can only be provided in the tire's carcass construction. Add ons such as taller, more dense treads or the insertion of sidewall scuff guard materials adds weight, that weight does not add to a tire's strength/load capacity.
If you do a search here you will find this has all been discussed many times over the years. People think if they run some magic PSI and some magic speed their standard ST tires will serve them well only to have a blowout that does thousands of dollars damage to their camper, but itís your camper.
Lynwood


All tires have usability parameters. Passenger tires even have quality grading. The difference in perception about available load capacities can be found in the regulations used for vehicle fitments. Automotive tires get load capacity reserves. Trailer tire fitments are not required to provide those type of reserves.


LT & ST tires do not carry the same weight, example, LT235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3042# at PSI. The ST235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3640# at 80 PSI. Casing construction materials are larger in the ST tires.

GA Mountaineer
10-27-2018, 02:03 PM
All tires have usability parameters. Passenger tires even have quality grading. The difference in perception about available load capacities can be found in the regulations used for vehicle fitments. Automotive tires get load capacity reserves. Trailer tire fitments are not required to provide those type of reserves.


LT & ST tires do not carry the same weight, example, LT235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3042# at PSI. The ST235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3640# at 80 PSI. Casing construction materials are larger in the ST tires.

So a manufacture can misspec a tire and be alright. Like the Goodyear G159 on a motorhome. Because they write the vehicle fitments. But I canít change from a poly fabric casing construction, to an all steel casing construction. One that has a load rating greater than 50% of the axle itís fitted to, plus a reserve and all at higher speed?
And textile 101, many small cords in a bundle are stronger than the same size bundle of larger cords.

CalandLinda
10-27-2018, 08:16 PM
(So a manufacture can misspec a tire and be alright?)

All the specifications a tire owner needs to know are on the tire sidewall. Many of the materials used by tire builders are kept confidential. The approving authority for those materials may be the Tire & Rim Association (TRA), they also keep it confidential.

(Like the Goodyear G159 on a motorhome. Let’s use one that is not so controversial, such as the G614.)

Because of its unique design qualities it qualifies for the LT prefix, yet it is registered for Regional Trailer Service (RST) and says, for trailer service only, right on it’s sidewall. Its carcass is of all steel construction and its tread cap is designed to be regrooved.

(Because they write the vehicle fitments.)

All original equipment tire fitments are the sole responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer. Their safety guidance comes from NHTSA via FMVSS.

(But I can’t change from a poly fabric casing construction, to an all steel casing construction.)

A polyester LT235/85R16 LRE tire has the same usability specs as a like sized steel cased tire. Same holds true for like sized ST tires.

(One that has a load rating greater than 50% of the axle it’s fitted to, plus a reserve and all at higher speed?)

The vehicle certified axles require tire fitments that meet the FMVSS minimum safety standards for fitment. With automotive tire fitments speed letters should all match. The only speed requirement for ST tires is they must be DOT certified for standard highway service. The GAWR axles do not limit the amount of load capacity of the tires fitted to them. All excess load capacity above the vehicle certified GARWs is considered load capacity reserves. Tire speed ratings are linked to its ability to carry its maximum load at greater speeds.

(And textile 101, many small cords in a bundle are stronger than the same size bundle of larger cords.)

There is no way to confirm that as that sort of tire information is confidential and may differ from builder to builder. When researching around you can find some ST manufacturers that state the building cords in ST tires are larger when compared to cords in LT or P tires. Thus they can carry much more weight than the LT or P tires with the same PSI per like sized tires.

Each tire identifies the basic material and number of cords and belts used in its construction. Size and tensile strength is not mentioned.

jeffba
10-28-2018, 05:56 AM
Still think it would be easier to set get a set of Sailuns..........

:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:
:hide::hide::hide:

suny07
10-28-2018, 06:15 AM
Still think it would be easier to set get a set of Sailuns..........

:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:
:hide::hide::hide:

agree - no-brainer. lets do an easy button - click it - just do it :D:D:D

https://ehonami.blob.core.windows.net/media/2018/06/9-no-brainer-steps-vitality-every-age.jpg (https://simpletire.com/catalog?select=1&brand=83&line=11794)

mlh
10-28-2018, 09:18 AM
agree - no-brainer. lets do an easy button - click it - just do it :D:D:D

https://ehonami.blob.core.windows.net/media/2018/06/9-no-brainer-steps-vitality-every-age.jpg (https://simpletire.com/catalog?select=1&brand=83&line=11794)

Why buy those when you can spend more for China Bombs? Fixing a flat on the side of the interstate while cars zoom past at 70 or 80 miles an hour is fun.
Lynwood

Lenny K
10-28-2018, 10:04 AM
I just had to click on the easy button. Cool.

jeffba
10-28-2018, 10:10 AM
easy button and 5% off

Rondo
10-28-2018, 03:45 PM
I have a question for this thread-- From what I've been able to research there are not many dealers across the US that are carrying the Sailun tire or that can even get them from their distributors. If I have Sailun's on my unit and I have a blowout or a problem with the tire, how am I suppose to continue down the road if there is no dealer in the area that carries or that can get the Sailun brand? I've checked around Omaha and the surrounding area and nobody carries or can get them. That is going through multiple dealers including Discount Tire and other dealers mentioned in previous threads here on the Forum. Am I suppose to sit somewhere until I can order a Sailun in from somewhere else and then try to find a dealer or tire shop to put them on. From what I've been able to deduct from other threads here they will not send them to you personally and only send them to a dealer or tire shop. From what I have learned from Keystone at the several previous Fall Rallies is that they went to Sailuns because they out scored the Goodyear G614's but only by less than a full percent in their testing or comparisons with the Sailun G637's. I am assuming that Keystone got a better price or bid for the Sailuns and went with them instead of the Goodyear's. I'm needing new tires on the Monte before heading South and really up in the air on what to buy. Any suggestions?

AZ Traveler
10-28-2018, 04:34 PM
I have a question for this thread-- From what I've been able to research there are not many dealers across the US that are carrying the Sailun tire or that can even get them from their distributors. If I have Sailun's on my unit and I have a blowout or a problem with the tire, how am I suppose to continue down the road if there is no dealer in the area that carries or that can get the Sailun brand? I've checked around Omaha and the surrounding area and nobody carries or can get them. That is going through multiple dealers including Discount Tire and other dealers mentioned in previous threads here on the Forum. Am I suppose to sit somewhere until I can order a Sailun in from somewhere else and then try to find a dealer or tire shop to put them on. From what I've been able to deduct from other threads here they will not send them to you personally and only send them to a dealer or tire shop. From what I have learned from Keystone at the several previous Fall Rallies is that they went to Sailuns because they out scored the Goodyear G614's but only by less than a full percent in their testing or comparisons with the Sailun G637's. I am assuming that Keystone got a better price or bid for the Sailuns and went with them instead of the Goodyear's. I'm needing new tires on the Monte before heading South and really up in the air on what to buy. Any suggestions?

Rondo,

Failures of the Sailun tires seem very rare so the risk is low. I did pick up a nail in one which required me to mount the spare. The nail was too close to the edge to be repaired, I had a new tire delivered to my home by simple tire within 48 hours.

mlh
10-28-2018, 04:43 PM
I would get 5 tires. There is very little change you will need the spare and almost no chance you will need to replace 2 tires on any one trip. If you should run into really bad luck and need 2 at the same time one could be replaced with something else. I will only bet on an almost sure thing but I’ll bet you will never need to replace two Sailum tires at once without replacing your camper. They are that dependable.
Lynwood

CalandLinda
10-29-2018, 03:19 AM
I'm needing new tires on the Monte before heading South and really up in the air on what to buy. Any suggestions?

Whatever - trailer tire - will give you 10-15% reserve load capacity above the trailer's certified GAWRs.

Here lies the greatest problem with the RVIA 10% recommendation. It's for OE tires. Maybe it will force RV trailer manufacturers to start a recommendation listing for acceptable replacement tires.

CalandLinda
10-29-2018, 11:56 AM
I would get 5 tires. There is very little change you will need the spare and almost no chance you will need to replace 2 tires on any one trip. If you should run into really bad luck and need 2 at the same time one could be replaced with something else. I will only bet on an almost sure thing but Iíll bet you will never need to replace two Sailum tires at once without replacing your camper. They are that dependable.
Lynwood

Just a note: When a catastrophic tire failure happens at highway speed, it's almost certain the opposing tire on a tandem axle trailer will suffer fatal or near fatal internal damages.

AZ Traveler
10-30-2018, 11:28 AM
Cal,

I have not heard of a catastrophic failure with a Sailun, it is generally something that causes a leak. Good reason to have and use a TPMS. If you lose two tires you are going to have to unhook and go find a replacement tire.

jeffba
10-30-2018, 12:18 PM
Hi Cal,

I have had a number of tire failures on SOB TTs over the years and never had a failure on the opposing tire on a tandem axle trailer. Where are you getting your information from?

thanks

Jeff

CalandLinda
10-30-2018, 02:55 PM
Hi Cal,

I have had a number of tire failures on SOB TTs over the years and never had a failure on the opposing tire on a tandem axle trailer. Where are you getting your information from?

thanks

Jeff

"The industry recommendation is if a tire fails on one side of a tandem-axle trailer, the adjacent tire on the same side should also be replaced as that tire likely bore excessive weight when the tire next to it failed."

That's basically what the USTMA says in chapter 4 of the reference provided below. (Give it a chance, chapter 4 is for all RVs).

https://www.ustires.org/sites/default/files/CareAndService_PassengerAndLightTruckTires.pdf

jeffba
10-30-2018, 03:53 PM
Cal thanks for the reference. I did a word search on opposite, fail and adjacent. None of the paragraphs containing those keywords could I draw the same conclusion. I may be missing something.

PSFORD99
10-30-2018, 05:35 PM
Cal thanks for the reference. I did a word search on opposite, fail and adjacent. None of the paragraphs containing those keywords could I draw the same conclusion. I may be missing something.

I am sure if you were to continue on that one tire, there would be some damage. But pulling right over, I don't see where there is going to have that big of effect on the one tire. I think it would have to travel ,some distance ,and build some excessive heat before damage would occur , but that just my opinion.

Texan
10-30-2018, 06:15 PM
I am sure if you were to continue on that one tire, there would be some damage. But pulling right over, I don't see where there is going to have that big of effect on the one tire. I think it would have to travel ,some distance ,and build some excessive heat before damage would occur , but that just my opinion.

The problem is when you have one tire blow out you have all the weight from that side shift to the other tire on that side and puts very excessive weight on that one tire. If you have a tire slowly deflate then it is not the same and would not be such a big problem. As for finding a Sailun tire if one goes bad, i carry a extra tire and wheel mounted just in case of that situation. I've had a factory wheel go bad two different times and was left with no spare because of the difficulty finding a spare wheel. As has been stated Sailun tires can be delivered to your location where ever you may be in 48 hours. If you know the address ahead then have it delivered there. Big-O tires i believe carry Sailuns. If you can't find a Sailun tire in an emergency then there certainly isn't anything wrong using another brand whether Goodyear or whatever as long as it is G rated. Sailun tires have to good of quality and price to pass up. You could buy 5 new Sailuns and if you lose one then you could buy another brand for a spare and still have 4 Sailuns on the ground.

CaptnJohn
10-31-2018, 01:28 PM
agree - no-brainer. lets do an easy button - click it - just do it :D:D:D

https://ehonami.blob.core.windows.net/media/2018/06/9-no-brainer-steps-vitality-every-age.jpg (https://simpletire.com/catalog?select=1&brand=83&line=11794)

5 Sailuns on my 5er and at 5 years old will be replaced with 5 more.

Wyatt Earp
10-31-2018, 09:45 PM
I've enjoyed this thread on tires but would like to ask about what to use to inflate them, air vs. nitrogen? My SOB had nitrogen tires and they appeared to run cooler than the Monty.



The challenge I have is my small compressor won't handle tires that require 110 psi. A tank of nitrogen starts around 2200 psi and depending on the cubic feet, should last a long time before needing to be changed. A regulator is under $100 and less expensive than a compressor. I've been told nitrogen runs cooler and doesn't leak as much as air.



I'd like to know what MOC thinks about air or nitrogen. I need to be able to top off my tires without having to haul the camper to a dealership. Thanks for your input.

AZ Traveler
10-31-2018, 11:24 PM
Wyatt,

There have been previous threads on this. Do as you please, IMHO nitrogen is a waste of money. I have to air my tires up every 2-3 months. Buy a handy small 150 PSI compressor - one time cost of $100-125. Most gas stations do not have a compressor that will fill your high pressure tires and I would not want to carry around a tank with 2200 psi.

RRman
11-01-2018, 06:00 AM
Possibly another consideration is how "sturdy"/ heavy the empty tire is.
I discovered Michelin XPS Ribs and Bridgestone Duravis R250 Tires weigh MUCH more than other tires of the same size. "More Rubber = stronger tire"? - assuming all the extra weight is not just in the tread?

Denny and Angie Miller
11-01-2018, 07:03 AM
I've read the tire posts for the last 3 years and realize lots of opinions, some very passionate about manufacturer, ST vs LT, etc. Wanted to share my experience
Started with factory Tow Masters, which i'm sure some will refer to as China Bombs, but we made trips from Fla to Mich UP and also Alaska with no issues, so put about 20K miles before a blow, and I believe that was due to under inflation, accidentally running only 60psi when rated for 80.

I did a lot of listening and considering about going to LT's, but ended up purchasing a set of Goodyear Endurance last year. (yes, already how the Goodyear haters opinion will be on that) Have made trips from Fla to Nova Scotia and just returned from a great trip to Utah, so only have a little less than 15K on this set, but believe the Endurance is a pretty good ST.

I think what i consider our success so far is due to 2 things: I am religious about tire pressure now, and keep mine at 75 psi. When we were just in 17 degree weather at Bryce Canyon and heading to Arches, made sure with that cold temp i had them at 75

Also speed, the ST's i have are rated for only 60 MPH and that's what i drive on the highway. Get to my destination a little later, but keeps within the limits of the tire speed, and I'm delighted with the 13 mpg we get on our trips

All that being said, good chance i will go to LT's when i get a new set. No down side, plenty of upside and it only raises the trailer height by probably less than 2 inches

ps: loved the Utah parks, people and weather and now back home in Fla sweating, but happy it's only 85 right now and not 95
Safe Travels
Ken

More proof that (imo) most, not all, peoples' previous tire issues are due to abuse. Whether unaware of, or just ignoring the use of load inflation tables, knowledge of your tires' age, pressure, speed rating, load limitations, and most of all, getting your trailer weighed are all pieces of information required to keep from abusing a tire.
How many people know, for example, their tires' actual speed rating and limit themselves to it? How many people do you think would be surprised to find their tire rated at 60 mph? I was. I'm guilty of being unaware of my tire speed rating (long ago), exceeding it (by only 10 mph) and paying the price. Since educating myself about tires and operating within their limitations I have had zero issues.
Some tires are better than others, but most are fine when used within their limitations, whatever the brand may be.

mlh
11-01-2018, 07:34 AM
I'd like to know what MOC thinks about air or nitrogen. I need to be able to top off my tires without having to haul the camper to a dealership. Thanks for your input.

Nitrogen is great for race cars where a few pounds of air make a big difference in handling or especially aircraft where air temperatures can go from 125 degrees to minus 40 in a few minutes. In our vehicles 78% nitrogen has the best cost benefit ratio, air. Nitrogen has no real benefit in our tires except maybe to make someone feel good.
Lynwood

Golfmedik
11-03-2018, 06:22 AM
Just a note: When a catastrophic tire failure happens at highway speed, it's almost certain the opposing tire on a tandem axle trailer will suffer fatal or near fatal internal damages.

The exact reason that I carry two spares! Been there!

RRman
11-03-2018, 07:06 PM
Hmm...
Regarding opposing tire internal damage.
I've had a few catastrophic tire failures in 11 years of traveling and don't recall the opposing tire failing anytime soon thereafter or at all...

Most recently I lost an entire wheel with a Michelin XPS RIB Tire this Spring. Not sure exactly what failed, but it was definitely catastrophic! After repairs/spare tire installation, the opposing Michelin XPS RIB tire traveled home from there about 100 Miles. Then it traveled about 1500 miles to from Montgomery AL to Cambridge MN. It sat for 5 months while working there and lost 5 lbs of air over that time (measured around 44 degrees on day of departure last month so some of that "loss" was likely due to the COLD). Then it traveled another 1500 miles from MN back home to AL.
If it doesn't make it to the RGV in TX next month or back home next Spring I will post an update.

phillyg
11-04-2018, 08:17 AM
Nitrogen is a waste of money for RVs, IMHO.

waynemoore
11-04-2018, 08:32 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, my understanding is nitrogenís molecule is larger than airís thatís why there in much less leakage so the tires stay inflated longer. Also nitrogen dose not transmit heat as much as air.

That said I find air a heck of a lot cheaper.

As for buying a tank of nitrogen or a compressor. The compressor you buy only once and can do more than blow up the tires.

Like blow the leaves and other items off of your outside rugs. Now you just saved buying a leaf blower.

I canít believe how much money you can save if I just keep going, but you get the idea.

fauch
12-20-2018, 04:43 AM
“”””LT & ST tires do not carry the same weight, example, LT235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3042# at PSI. The ST235/85R16 LRE has a maximum load capacity of 3640# at 80 PSI. Casing construction materials are larger in the ST tires.“””

That LT tire is not at max load capacity until 106 mph.

phillyg
12-20-2018, 08:04 AM
ďĒĒĒLT & ST tires do not carry the same weight......
That LT tire is not at max load capacity until 106 mph.

Fauch, I was with you till you mentioned mph. The tire is "rated" at x lbs regardless of 65mph or 106mph, otherwise the load rating would be worthless.

PSFORD99
12-20-2018, 08:47 AM
Fauch, I was with you till you mentioned mph. The tire is "rated" at x lbs regardless of 65mph or 106mph, otherwise the load rating would be worthless.


I think we have beat this dead horse discussion about speed , and rating before.
I am with you on the matter for what ever its worth .

fauch
12-20-2018, 09:15 AM
I still do not know why this is so hard to understand. The tire service and speed rating (load/speed index) means that the tire will carry the given load rating UP TO the 106 mph speed Rating. Past 106mph weight capcity starts deminishing. As speed approaches then passes speed rating, weight capacity progressively deminishes. An L speed rated tire (the Saliun) approaches, then goes past it’s load capacity at 75 mph which is better than the ST trailer tires that were rated for max load at 65 mph. Videos of tires in a spin/load machine exploding as speed goes beyond rating with simulated max load, impressively demonstrate the principle of centrifugal force and tire failure.

CalandLinda
12-20-2018, 10:01 AM
Possibly another consideration is how "sturdy"/ heavy the empty tire is.
I discovered Michelin XPS Ribs and Bridgestone Duravis R250 Tires weigh MUCH more than other tires of the same size. "More Rubber = stronger tire"? - assuming all the extra weight is not just in the tread?


Both of those tire brands are steel cased. The Michelin is retreadable.


Those things are for durability. They carry the same weight as a like sized polyester cased tire.

CalandLinda
12-20-2018, 10:06 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, my understanding is nitrogenís molecule is larger than airís thatís why there in much less leakage so the tires stay inflated longer. Also nitrogen dose not transmit heat as much as air.

That said I find air a heck of a lot cheaper.

As for buying a tank of nitrogen or a compressor. The compressor you buy only once and can do more than blow up the tires.

Like blow the leaves and other items off of your outside rugs. Now you just saved buying a leaf blower.

I canít believe how much money you can save if I just keep going, but you get the idea.


Nitrogen information.

https://www.ustires.org/sites/default/files/TISB_44_USTMA.pdf