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Kenw
09-26-2018, 07:28 PM
Alright, here is my question for the forum.

I have a 2017 5th wheel that when I got it new in April 2017 I changed the tires to one of the two most popular tires recommended here (I'm not going to tell you!). I'm not overweight or speeding. I only put +-1500 miles per year on them and the 5th wheel is stored indoors. I expect that they will still look great in 10+ years! I read/heard that they need to be changed from every three years up to 10 years. Placing all of the other reasons aside when do I replace them based on age only? When do you replace yours?

Thanks!
Ken

AZ Traveler
09-26-2018, 07:48 PM
Ken,

As inexpensive as the tires are, I would not go past 5 years assuming they still look good.

Montana Man
09-26-2018, 08:34 PM
With low exposure to uv, 6 years at least. Tires should also be exercised some throught the year as prolonged storage is problematic. Annual inspections will also help you know how long they will last.

Eagleback
09-27-2018, 04:17 AM
Ken,

As inexpensive as the tires are, I would not go past 5 years assuming they still look good.




X2. Maybe a little longer if the tires are stored off the ground.

Phil P
09-27-2018, 04:20 AM
Hi

The manufacturer has a recommendation for the tire you purchased.

The Goodyear G614 has a recommended usage of 7 years other Goodyear tires have a recommended 5 years and some Good year tires should not even be used to transport the trailer from the trailer manufacturer’s facility to the sales lot regardless of the age Goodyear recommends.

So I would say anything over the recommended manufacturers change date is a crap shoot.

The G614 that failed on us last month was 6 years 7 months old but had been drug sideways for a mile or so in 2013 and I really should not have been using it.

There are many factors that determine the life cycle of a tire.

Phil P

RoadRunnerTR21
09-27-2018, 05:20 AM
Ken,

As inexpensive as the tires are, I would not go past 5 years assuming they still look good.


X3. I have always changed tires during the 5th year of their life. I had a 7 year old tire let go once for no apparent reason and it was not a pretty picture.

mazboy
09-27-2018, 05:25 AM
here you go: 'whatever you feel comfortable about changing them.' you'll always get different opinions.

i'd do it every 4-5 years but only because I really wear them out.

mlh
09-27-2018, 06:28 AM
My Goodyear store manager told me Goodyear Corp wont even fix a flat after 6 years. I’m sure at least that long is safe.
Lynwood

Carl n Susan
09-27-2018, 08:55 AM
The revered warranty on a Goodyear G614 is only 4 years. Does that mean anything?

twindman
09-27-2018, 04:59 PM
Gee, guys and gals: How do you get over 5 years? I have averaged 10,000 miles a year so I shoot for 4-5 years!! :-)

DQDick
09-27-2018, 06:19 PM
On trailer tires the miles don't really matter. We always covered our tires, always checked pressure, monitored constantly and checked heat and for any imperfection whenever we stopped. Still had a 614 blow without warning at a little less than 6 years.

Phil P
09-28-2018, 04:16 AM
Hi

Like DQDick points out there is no reason for some tire failures.

You never know if the pot hole you hit leaving Memphis on the interstate caused some broken cords in one tire that will fail several thousand miles latter.

Our trailer is on its third set of tires and we have rite at 100,000 miles on the trailer.

I went with an E rated Firestone TransForce tire this time to see how they hold up I have had very good luck with them on the TV.

Phil P

bigred715
10-03-2018, 10:56 AM
I took my Michelin tires off after 6 1/2 yrs and feel I could have gone longer. Always covered, proper inflation and checked regularly. Switched to Saiun 235/85-16 including spare. Keep the tires off the ground by putting a piece of plywood under tread and will spin the tires every month to prevent flat spots when in storage for more than 2 months. They will also have tire covers on them. The Sailuns appear to ride rougher, but I also added Timbrems to the truck so that may be the reason also.

Mark N.
10-03-2018, 01:37 PM
If not exposed to sunlight full-time and separated from the concrete by something, then 6 years is totally safe.

scattershot
10-03-2018, 01:41 PM
5-6 years for me, and I’m leaning more toward 5 lately. I run BF Goodrich Commercial TA on my 2955.

saber707
10-03-2018, 02:08 PM
5 years good "rule of thumb".

StageCoachDriver
10-03-2018, 02:19 PM
Most tire dealers will tell you RV tires will die of dry rot before they lose their tread. Not sure I'd go with any of the lesser expensive brands, but I stay away from the most expensive ones out there. I do check tire pressure every 3 or 4 days on the road. Low pressure is the #1 killer of tires.

saber707
10-03-2018, 02:36 PM
Most tire dealers will tell you RV tires will die of dry rot before they lose their tread. Not sure I'd go with any of the lesser expensive brands, but I stay away from the most expensive ones out there. I do check tire pressure every 3 or 4 days on the road. Low pressure is the #1 killer of tires.

Amen. Low pressure, no bueno. I'm fanatical about checking tire pressure almost every time I move the unit.

AZ Traveler
10-03-2018, 02:40 PM
Use a quality TPMS and you will always know your tire pressures and will be able to monitor the temp and pressure as you drive.

twindman
10-03-2018, 11:32 PM
Ditto with what AZ Traveler said. I had a fast leak near El Paso - went down to 30 lb (in about 30 seconds) before I got stopped and to 0 in about 3-4 minutes stopped on an overpass with about 12 inches on the curb side. Saved me damage if tire had shredded. Had a nail or screw in the tread.
It did help me find a problem with uneven wear on one side, so that was good.

waynemoore
10-04-2018, 05:28 PM
Tires and brakes are the most important items on your rig. The only thing between you and the road is the tires so keeping them in good shape is critical. I replace mine every 5 years. I don’t care what they look like it’s just cheep insurance.

Caniel
10-06-2018, 07:10 AM
I read some where that trailer tires need to be exercised. Some thing about compounds that keep the tire supple and something else (can't remember at moment) need tire movement to work. (I'll have to look for the reference.)

I understand the worst thing one can do to a trailer (ST) tire is to let it sit with weight on it. If it is going to sit for long periods of time, I'd suggest jacking the trailer up to take the load off the tires. Naturally it would need to be properly supported for storage.

timandsusan
10-06-2018, 09:04 AM
I consider the sitting still time or storage the worst situation for tires. My rule, no tires on the road with an age of over 3 years. Mileage has little to impact even though we regularly do 3500 miles a year towing. How do the tires look after 3 years--really great but the damage in my mind is to the internal structure.

Razahoryin
10-07-2018, 08:48 PM
Alright, here is my question for the forum.

I have a 2017 5th wheel that when I got it new in April 2017 I changed the tires to one of the two most popular tires recommended here (I'm not going to tell you!). I'm not overweight or speeding. I only put +-1500 miles per year on them and the 5th wheel is stored indoors. I expect that they will still look great in 10+ years! I read/heard that they need to be changed from every three years up to 10 years. Placing all of the other reasons aside when do I replace them based on age only? When do you replace yours?

Thanks!
Ken
I run goodyear G614’s
Change them out at 5 Years without question
The damage caused by a blow out will always exceed the cost of the tire replacement

I had recently pulled my used spare down to inspect

It was a 2012 tire used as a spare
The tread and outer side wall were perfect
The inside side wall about a inch from the rim bead was showing excessive cracking.. that tire is toast

Don’t be fooled by remaining tread

scattershot
10-07-2018, 09:34 PM
I have had several blowouts, from inferior tires and from letting them go beyond five years on one occasion. The damage far exceeded the cost of new tires. Even though the tires look almost new, they disintegrate over time. I recommend changing them out every five years.

PSFORD99
10-08-2018, 08:49 AM
I have had several blowouts, from inferior tires and from letting them go beyond five years on one occasion. The damage far exceeded the cost of new tires. Even though the tires look almost new, they disintegrate over time. I recommend changing them out every five years.


That ,and the Sailun S637's :)

goodellj
11-12-2018, 05:37 AM
Thanks for all the great advice, both how long tires should last and when to replace them even if they look good. My 2012 3150RL came with "E" rated tires and I replaced them on a regular basis, one at a time, due to slow leaks and broken belts. I started carrying new, unmounted extra tires with me on every trip! I couldn't figure out why my tires were wearing out so fast till a Texas tire technician suggested that even though I was under the weight limit for the trailer and the tires, maybe I was too close to the limit (within 1,000 lbs). I switched to "G" rated tires 2 & 1/2 years ago, which gave me another 800 lbs of tire weight capacity. So far they have been great. During those difficult years with "E" rated tires I became a fanatic about my tires and pressures, got a tire pressure monitoring system, and did a thorough tire inspection before every trip. After 2 & 1/2 years and 18,000 miles I was starting to wonder when the "G" tires should be "aged out" and replaced, even if they still look good. I am continuing my inspections, keeping the trailer weight down, and I hope I can get to 5 years!

MidMOTraveler
11-12-2018, 06:22 AM
Go by the DOT date code on the tire NOT year of unit tires are on!
During my working days I went through several cab/chassis 1 tons dually’s.
Tires almost always were a year older than the model year of the truck.
This might not hold true with trailer tires on new units the way they are cranking them out !
I still go by a quote from my dad 50 years ago when I started driving.
“I want my family riding on the new half of tires “

jeffba
11-12-2018, 08:20 AM
The Sailuns on mine were only 3 months older than the build date

Mark N.
11-12-2018, 09:09 AM
I consider the sitting still time or storage the worst situation for tires. My rule, no tires on the road with an age of over 3 years. Mileage has little to impact even though we regularly do 3500 miles a year towing. How do the tires look after 3 years--really great but the damage in my mind is to the internal structure.
Wow. 3 years is about half (or less) of the minimum the tire engineers recommend. To me, that's like the 3,000 mile oil change myth. Lots of people doing it in spite of all expert opinions saying it's a total waste of money and resources. However, we all choose to spend our money as we see fit. I've been pulling for 45 years now and and have NEVER suffered a blowout in a tire that was under 5 or 6 years old. I'm all about preventive caution in life, but I also stop before being silly about it.

Mark N.
11-12-2018, 09:14 AM
I read some where that trailer tires need to be exercised. Some thing about compounds that keep the tire supple and something else (can't remember at moment) need tire movement to work. (I'll have to look for the reference.)

I understand the worst thing one can do to a trailer (ST) tire is to let it sit with weight on it. If it is going to sit for long periods of time, I'd suggest jacking the trailer up to take the load off the tires. Naturally it would need to be properly supported for storage.
Or, as I do, go out several times per storage season, use the levelers, lift each side and rotate each tire 1/4 turn and set it back down. I set my tires on a piece of heavy, flexible plastic (an old "sit on it on the snow and slide down the hill" thingy I cut up) to seperate them from the concrete.

CalandLinda
11-14-2018, 03:47 PM
Trailer tire aging is very unpredictable. Most tire manufacturers have a ballpark or target figure that can be found in their advertisement brochures, internet PDF files and most commonly, in their tire warranty packages. In my researching I find that Carlisle Tire probably made the first public declaration for their ST tire aging. It was a wide 3-5 years and has been duplicated numerous times in other well established internet tire information outlets.

Other tire designs by popular brands such as Goodyear or Michelin have predictions out to 10 years. But, even those protect those predictions with recommendations for tire inspections by experienced tire technicians at the 5 year mark.

IMO tires used on an RV trailers, no matter their design, must all come under the same age limit scrutiny. The constant load on RV trailer tires will play a major role in their long jeopardy. Just maybe, the higher the load capacity reserves the longer the life span. But, even that, may not counter the effect of long inactivity intervals that increases the effect of fatigue or more commonly, degrading of the tires.

Read the tire’s warranty package. And, remember, no matter what the design, they MUST be considered age-out tires.

barryn
11-15-2018, 08:29 PM
Look, we do 5 years and change out tires. Both truck and trailer. $1,800.00 in tires only or $1,800.00 x 2 for tires and damage. We choose tires only. Hopefully that is ALWAYS wishful thinking. I have found over the years that there are taboo's, myths, that people believe. I am going to upset some people but you can't please everyone. FACTS, just because you the tire covered, or keep it off the ground/concrete does not mean its going to last longer. Did ALL the tricks and they still go bad. Best you can do to a tire is roll it. This will release the chemical in the rubber to keep the rubber together. Just because you let your tailgate down, your not going to gain any fuel mileage. Be safe a check those tires.

Texan
11-16-2018, 01:02 AM
Wow. 3 years is about half (or less) of the minimum the tire engineers recommend. To me, that's like the 3,000 mile oil change myth. Lots of people doing it in spite of all expert opinions saying it's a total waste of money and resources. However, we all choose to spend our money as we see fit. I've been pulling for 45 years now and and have NEVER suffered a blowout in a tire that was under 5 or 6 years old. I'm all about preventive caution in life, but I also stop before being silly about it.

Old habits are hard to break but agree 5 or 6 years is reasonable for replacing tires and give a all around inspection when tires are off for wheel bearing greasing and a very good look at when checking the suspension before traveling. Many people just look at the outside of the tire and don't inspect the inside which is just as important.