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wotg2015
04-15-2016, 06:32 PM
Other than appropriate tire maintenance, have you done anything to your Montana to help protect it from any collateral damage that might occur from a tire blowout? If so, please share.

Thank you.

rohrmann
04-15-2016, 07:24 PM
Yes, upgraded to Goodyear G614 tires and maintain them at 110 psi, have a TPMS system, visually inspect them and regularly check the tires with an infrared temperature device. I can't see any way of adding any barriers that would stop damage from a blowout. Best to avoid the blowout instead of expecting it to happen.

TLightning
04-16-2016, 02:16 AM
Don't know that you can do anything to the Montana. As for the tires, I keep them properly inflated, on boards when stored, treated with Aerospace 303 when travelling, and covered when in a CG.

JandC
04-16-2016, 02:35 AM
I have always suspected many tire blow outs happen to newer fivers because the owners leave the underrated tires on them. Many new fivers, including Montana's, come with cheap underrated tires that may get the unit from northern Indiana to the dealer but not much further. Then we purchase the units, add 1,500 to 2,500 pounds of personal gear, and rip down the highway for our first blowout.

The only way I know of to best protect a Montana from blowout damage is to have the properly rated tires (usually G), and install a TPMS. If a tire does start to deflate at least your TPMS with immediately let you know.

DarMar
04-16-2016, 03:03 AM
G rated tires properly inflated and TPMS are the best protection I know of.

rames14
04-16-2016, 03:55 AM
We have been very happy with G614 tires. We also run TST flow thru TPMS. Good tires, proper inflation and inspection are the best we have found in our almost 13 years of Montana ownership. We also used to IR check at stops, but the TPMS gives me temp as well.

richfaa
04-16-2016, 04:32 AM
Nothing can protect from a blowout that is a "sudden and unexpected failure" however most blowouts are really a result of a gradual and undetected loss of PSI and once the tires comes off the rim it looks and feels like a blowout.Good tires and most of all a Tire Monitor system can greatly reduce damage. We have never had a "blowout in over 80K of travel but have had several loss of psi incid ebts detected by out Tire monitor system allowing us to get off the road before any damage.Cost of damage to RV due t o a "blowout" can be several thousand $$.Cost of a tire monitor system 300 or so $$$.

DQDick
04-16-2016, 04:50 AM
We're with everyone else. G 614's currently with over 45,000 miles, tire monitors, tire covers when parked and plastic placemats under the tires if we are ever parked on concrete (those little black marks tires leave when parked on concrete for any length of time is the anti-aging chemical leaching out, only concrete does that.

pkbridges77
04-16-2016, 05:15 AM
quote:Originally posted by DQDick

We're with everyone else. G 614's currently with over 45,000 miles, tire monitors, tire covers when parked and plastic placemats under the tires if we are ever parked on concrete (those little black marks tires leave when parked on concrete for any length of time is the anti-aging chemical leaching out, only concrete does that.

Dick, I did not know this. I've heard what I considered "old wive's tales", same for batteries on concrete, but not ever an explanation. Thank you!

BB_TX
04-16-2016, 06:50 AM
I agree with above. Well cared for, good quality tires is the best you can do. Nothing short of armor plating will stop collateral damage. A TPMS can help prevent damage due to a tire losing pressure and then coming apart. But even a TMS cannot prevent damage due to a true blowout. I have TPMS on my truck. But recently had a blowout (instant loss of pressure with no warning) that destroyed my right side rear fender. First blowout ever in over 50 yrs driving, but it was a doozy.

I am an advocate of TPMS though as I also feel most tire failures are due to running a tire after it has become low on pressure. And that don't happen only when you are stopped and able to check it.

TLightning
04-16-2016, 11:00 AM
I don't think Keystone puts "under rated" tires on the Montanas. They are required to put tires on them that meet the load requirements...it's just that use cheap Chinese tires that don't hold up well.

1retired06
04-16-2016, 12:34 PM
Underrated as soon as you load up for travel. Keystone is irresponsible

TLightning
04-16-2016, 02:39 PM
I think you will find when doing the math, that for a 17k Montana, subtracting 20% for PW, the OEM tires meet the requirement for max load capability. I'm not supporting Keystone or the tire manufacturers...the manufacturer puts out lousy tires and Keystone uses them because they are cheap. But, technically, Keystone is meeting the requirement to have tires rated for the GVWR load they might carry.

richfaa
04-16-2016, 04:13 PM
Tom is correct. The tires meet the required spec's that does not mean they are high quality tires only that they meet the spec's. It would not make any sense for a manufacturer to put tires on a Rv that did not meet spec's. Their legal eagles are smarter than that.

sambam
04-16-2016, 04:31 PM
Hear the warning. Rid yourself of the "delivery tires" and find a good LT (6k axles), or G (7k axles) to do the actual work of towing your Montana around. As in what appears to be all aspects of manufacturing, the cheapest way out providing the highest profit margin is how we do business in these United States. Long as it will stand up in court. Which it will. You just have to plan on paying big $$ and then replacing parts that have to actually work for a period of time before getting what you thought you were paying for in the first place. My '10 may not be the latest and greatest, but I know what it is, and what it needs. I've already spent the extra $$ on stuff that it should have had leaving the dealer. I'll stick with it because I know if I decide to buy new, I'll be starting all over again. This is NOT a good time for the consumer. My opinion only.

richfaa
04-17-2016, 04:56 AM
We have spent many $$ bringing both of our Montana's up to the standards we require for our travel and lifestyle. If we were weekenders or low end users we probably would not have spent most of those $$. Tires, suspension, Tire monitoring systems. Rear view camera, Better hitch on Rv and in truck.

These Rv's are not designed for the use that many of us put them to and many buyers would not pay the price to have what I feel is needed for our travel needs.We have come a long way the buyer can arrange to have G614 tires and Mor Ryde IS and Disc brakes installed and pay the price. We have well over 5K $$ invested in this 13 3402 to meet our travel needs and that does not include improvements to our holding tank support system to prevent failures.

Art-n-Marge
04-17-2016, 06:22 AM
I think Sambam has it right. Many tire problems occur with the very first set of tires that are on the rig. This was true for me on the two trailers I owned - a TT with original Carlisles, and my current Monty with Missions. Every other set of tires I've owned were cared for and monitored by me and I've not had any type of factory failure. I'm sure the original delivery driver was responsible for abusing the tires prior to my ownership.

Admittedly, the only other tire failure I've had was when I got too close to a curb when towing my trailer, then both tires were dragged into a drop for a rain drain and I ended up destroying the tires on the curb side as they contacted the curb. But that was my fault for getting too close to the drain curb and I deserved the ensuing problem and yes, I learned a lesson about being more aware of this condition.

I've used ST tires exclusively and have had good luck with them and attribute that to advice, experience and knowledge gained from my own or MOC members research and experiences and no more abusing my tires.

Bigboomer
04-17-2016, 09:27 AM
Pretty much what others have noted....we put the G614's and the TST 507 Flow Thru tire pressure monitors on.

You do need to always check the tires for damage, etc. As there is a lot of stress on these when making turns. Regardless of how good the tire is supposed to be stuff happens.

TLightning
04-17-2016, 11:07 AM
I find it interesting to compare our tires with OEM motor home tires. We don't do it much now, but in the past we used to do lots of travelling with three motor homes...we were the only 5th wheel. Our tires were always a concern, they checked their's (every once in a while) and nobody ever had a problem. Based on my limited knowledge of their tires, there are two primary reasons they had no trouble:

- Our ST OEM tires are Chinese, MH tires are made here or Japan.
- Our tires are used at capacity or near capacity. MH tires are operating with a huge reserve. It was not uncommon for one set of friends to have tires on one side of their dually axle with the total capacity of the two tires of nearly 14,000#. So on a typical 20,000# axle, at max capacity, the MH had tires with a combined weight carrying ability of 28,000# on an axle weighing no more than 20,000#. Bottom line, our tires are at max capacity, MH tires have a 2,000# reserve per tire.

Mudchief
04-17-2016, 03:32 PM
G614 and a tire monitoring system. When we weighed our unit the weight on the tires ran between 3400-3500 pounds per tire. I can assure you the tires that come on the unit will not handle that.

washley1
04-18-2016, 06:29 PM
And not to forget, 5 years max, no matter what they look like! We took off last week with inspected, fully inflated G614's and lost one an hour out from home. About a grand worth of body work. And all because I let them get old! 6 plus years led to a would be disaster. New tires, more 614's, and a good insurance policy will pick up the body work. We were lucky!

fauch
04-19-2016, 09:08 AM
The E rated ST tires from the factory get compromised by delivery drivers towing at high speeds. The reason there are so many blowouts on these tires is that they are rated for max load at 65mph.The reason there are so many boat trailers, utility trailers, and RVs, on the side of the road with blowouts, is because they have tires rated at 65MPH. This seems to be a concept that most people have a hard time fathoming. Speed (past the rating) is as destructive as under inflation.

It's been an issue for truckers, lawmakers and the truck tire industry also:
http://www.standard.net/Business/2015/03/31/Utah-s-80-mph-speed-limit-heightens-truck-tire-blowout-danger

vipermanden
04-21-2016, 09:45 AM
We are getting ready to buy a Montana 5th wheel, and I have had blow outs on rented 30' trailers, that the rental companies did not take care of the tires. So I always wondered why the heavy 5th wheel trailers did not come with three axles like some of the toy haulers do? That way, when one tire blows out, it is not so catastrophic, because there are still two tires on that side holding the trailer up? What is the reason for having only two, tiny tires holding up 14-15k pounds?

TLightning
04-21-2016, 10:23 AM
quote:Originally posted by vipermanden

We are getting ready to buy a Montana 5th wheel, and I have had blow outs on rented 30' trailers, that the rental companies did not take care of the tires. So I always wondered why the heavy 5th wheel trailers did not come with three axles like some of the toy haulers do? That way, when one tire blows out, it is not so catastrophic, because there are still two tires on that side holding the trailer up? What is the reason for having only two, tiny tires holding up 14-15k pounds?


Follow the money. If two axles and four tires meet the letter of the law, that's all you're going to get.

mlh
04-21-2016, 11:00 AM
When you have a tire come apart that is turning 600 to 700 hundred RPMs that the part beating against your camper weighs 30'pounds or so there isn't much you can do to prevent it from destroying what ever gets in the way. The only way to prevent damage is to prevent a blowout in the first place and the only way to do that is to use tires with as much margin built in them as possible. In other words any thing but ST tires.
Lynwood

Dam Worker
04-21-2016, 02:58 PM
On the way home from work tonight I saw three separate spots where people had blowouts. I did see at least five or six RV's on the road and the temps were down from the upper eighties to the upper seventies. No rigs stranded so they happened earlier in the day.

Tom Marty

Sundogette
04-22-2016, 04:19 AM
In addition to the proper equipment, maintenance practices, and regular inspection, another factor is driving at reasonable speeds. We run Michelin 15.5, Mor-Ryde, etc., etc. Can't express how many times we have had rigs blow by us on the freeway, only to see them parked by the side of the road with a blow out later in the day. We typically run 62 mph on the highway. Need to get a bumper sticker that reads, I'm retired..go around!

richfaa
04-22-2016, 01:33 PM
We have pulled 600 miles on interstates yesteday and today. We run 62/65 and we have been passed by scores TT's and RV's doing 70/80 MPH.

mlh
04-22-2016, 02:04 PM
Rich that sounds like me but I swear I haven't been out.
Lynwood

richfaa
04-22-2016, 02:19 PM
Many of then are running on OEM tires rated at 65 MPH.

mlh
04-22-2016, 02:38 PM
Yes and there lies the problem. Why would any manufacturer put 65 MPH tires on a camper and send it out on 75 MPH roads. They know very well a lot read most people will be running at or over the speed limit. Most people don't even know their tires are ST tires or what that means. Why do they put ST tires on campers, they are cheap both the tires and the manufacturer.
Lynwood

fauch
04-25-2016, 11:39 AM
quote:Originally posted by mlh

Yes and there lies the problem. Why would any manufacturer put 65 MPH tires on a camper and send it out on 75 MPH roads. They know very well a lot read most people will be running at or over the speed limit. Most people don't even know their tires are ST tires or what that means. Why do they put ST tires on campers, they are cheap both the tires and the manufacturer.
Lynwood


Because they can! Delivery driver signs a liability waiver, cheap-a&% tires mean bigger margin, labeling (GVWR) on trailer vs labeling on tire shifts liability to 'person towing the towable'. In court; the person in the position of "person in charge" (driver) usually ends up LIABLE.
.

richfaa
04-25-2016, 03:08 PM
NOt knowing is no excuse.

mlh
04-26-2016, 02:57 AM
If you Google ST tires you would think they are the perfect tire for a camper and that is all most people have to go by. If you try to tell them they done believe you. I saw a guy last year with a blown tire, tried to help him but he was already mad. I told him about the ST tires. It would have been better to have slapped his mother. I thought oh well you will learn its not my camper with the side tore off.
Lynwood

Beau2010
04-26-2016, 05:38 AM
Our Montana came with GY Marathons. After two years and about 25,000 miles, two were failing due to separations. Never had a blowout or even loss of pressure, however. I check air before I start out each day and carry a compressor; sure beats looking for a truck stop or tire shop where you can get to the air hose. Put on Sailuns last summer and run at 110 psi. Side wall says "for trailer use only". Just because my truck can pull it at 80 mph or better doesn't mean I should. Keep it under 65.

Anyone who thinks light truck tires are the answer for their trailer tire problems has likely never turned sharply with a double or triple axle trailer with truck tires on it. They are not made to be scruffed sideways like happens in a sharp turn. In my former life, I hauled livestock to stock yards and sale barns around the Midwest. I have seen many gooseneck stock trailers on the side of the road with one or more blown tires after being turned too short with a load of big steers. Most of the drivers had put truck tires on the trailer thinking they would stand the extra weight better. They are fine so long as you don't have to turn so short that one or more tires slide sideways. Truck tires cannot take that kind of abuse.

Trailer tire like the Sailuns or equivalent if kept inflated and driven at reasonable speeds will outlast any truck tire in a multi axle trailer application.

fauch
04-26-2016, 01:31 PM
I disagree that LT tires cannot handle drift-slide-roll load. Truck tires will always be my choice for any trailer that I own. Load rating-proper air pressure and SPEED traveled vs speed rating are the limiting factors. Think about the roll force on steer tires on a tractor trailer, or even a 3/4 or one ton pickup truck. nowhere on any truck tire that i have ever seen, is stated 'not suitable for steer axle or dual axle trailers.

mhs4771
04-26-2016, 03:07 PM
OK, put you "Way Back Hat" on and go back a few years before ST and Chinese tires became the norm. My folks hauled their TT all over the place and never had any tire problems, and probably many of the tires we bias ply before radials became popular and affordable.
Seems like most of all the recent tire issue come from two factors: ST Tires and Chinese Tires!

mlh
04-26-2016, 03:12 PM
You need to add one more 12000 pound campers and trucks that can pull them.
Lynwood

djgodden
05-03-2016, 08:07 AM
Don't over look speed limits some states have on towing. In California any tow is limited to 60 mph. Ya, nearly no one pays any attention. Except for me, I'm religious about never exceeding 60 mph. If I wanted to get there sooner, I'd have left earlier.

waynemoore
05-03-2016, 10:38 AM
CA is a 55MPH state while towing, but I also drive 60 to 63MPH driving 55 in CA will get you run over. I will go to 70 if passing but only for the pass then back to about 60 to 63. Also I picked up my rig on Thursday spent till Saturday doing the pre delivery then took it to the tire store and had the china bombs replaced.

Dam Worker
05-03-2016, 02:36 PM
I feel a lot more confident with my Trail Kings taken off and my 14 ply G series tires on. :-)
Having 500 plus pounds insurance at each tire and a higher speed rating is a good feeling.

Tom Marty

Ozark Dave
06-22-2016, 11:50 AM
Saw a guy at the gas station with Monty and Trailer Kings. I asked him if he'd heard the stories about those tires and he said no. So I informed him. He seemed a little put off and I told him to do an online search and he'd see for him self. Well, now he knows.

Can anybody do the math on how much Keystone saves per unit by installing Trailer Kings vs good tires (at their est cost) times the number of units they ship per year?? This would help me understand their motive. My guess is that is not its really not that much in light of the risk they are taking. Somebody at HQ needs to pull their head out and wake up!!!!!

Ozark Dave
06-22-2016, 12:09 PM
quote:Originally posted by richfaa

NOt knowing is no excuse.



I'm no lawyer but I remember something in my law class about implied warranty of merchantability which after referencing Wikipedia means the product has to be suited for its intended purposes from the reasonable usage of the consumer. Warning labels can't take it away!!!

Mr Pachu
06-22-2016, 04:40 PM
Has anyone used or know anything about Westlake Load range G tires? A local tire shop has a special on ST235/85R16 14PLY WESTLAKE CR960A ALL STEEL ST TRAILER TIRES. I know that I don't want Westlake Load range E tires but what about Load range G? These are just under half price of the G614 and I can't find a local tire shop that sells Saliuns.

sapest
06-23-2016, 05:21 PM
Mr Pachu
If you are near a Kal Tire, they sell Sailuns, at least in the west.
-Steve

Rainer
06-30-2016, 04:31 AM
Junk ANY ST tires and replace them with name brand LT tires.

pkbridges77
06-30-2016, 05:11 AM
quote:Originally posted by Mr Pachu

Has anyone used or know anything about Westlake Load range G tires? A local tire shop has a special on ST235/85R16 14PLY WESTLAKE CR960A ALL STEEL ST TRAILER TIRES. I know that I don't want Westlake Load range E tires but what about Load range G? These are just under half price of the G614 and I can't find a local tire shop that sells Saliuns.

We were in Savannah,GA when I needed to replace them and I called Sailun customer service off the website for a local dealer/distributor. They shipped tires to the dealer and had them installed the next day.

rohrmann
06-30-2016, 10:30 AM
At our Western Region Rally, the Keystone sales rep, Chase Booth, told us, among other things, that all new Montana's are going to start coming with G range tires. I guess all the complaints have finally gotten through to the Montana group at Keystone. I'm thinking that will be for the 2017 model year rigs.

bshgto
07-04-2016, 02:12 AM
quote:Originally posted by rohrmann

At our Western Region Rally, the Keystone sales rep, Chase Booth, told us, among other things, that all new Montana's are going to start coming with G range tires. I guess all the complaints have finally gotten through to the Montana group at Keystone. I'm thinking that will be for the 2017 model year rigs.


Will that be G rated China bombs?

mhs4771
07-04-2016, 04:48 AM
Probably the "G" rated Westlakes that some other Thor Brands are using. Friends so far have a few thousand miles on their Westlakes with no problems, and it's a fairly heavy 5er.

MARK A
07-04-2016, 06:25 PM
quote:Originally posted by rohrmann

At our Western Region Rally, the Keystone sales rep, Chase Booth, told us, among other things, that all new Montana's are going to start coming with G range tires. I guess all the complaints have finally gotten through to the Montana group at Keystone. I'm thinking that will be for the 2017 model year rigs.


I hope you're not holding your breath..You'll likely turn mighty blue before that happens.

Mark

HOOK
07-11-2016, 11:59 AM
We are very pleased with our last two sets of G614s. The peace of mind is worth the price , IMHO.

farmall130
07-23-2016, 12:50 PM
Well, one of my Chinese Goodyear Marathons EXPLODED on the way home from the beach today, did considerable damage to the side that I'm hoping my insurance will cover. These tires are parked under a shed always, have less than 2000 miles on them and we had just stopped for a break and none of them felt unusually hot considering it was 94 outside. So you folks are saying even though Goodyear makes the junk supplied on these trailers, the tire to buy is a Goodyear G614? Any other good options? My trailer only weighs about 13,500 lbs.

waynemoore
07-23-2016, 01:31 PM
Well a 2013 rig more likely built in 2012 may have 5 year old tires on it. Plus the transport driver drove well over the 65 mph cap on these tires. Most people don't know these tires should not be run over 65 mph. The very first thing when I bought my rig is tow it 7 miles to a Discount tire dealer and replace the trail King tires with LT tires.

rames14
07-23-2016, 05:24 PM
When you look at an RV lot, what do comparable brands come with as tires? Our dealer could order with G rated tires, but they don't. Most new 5th wheel owners and most dealers are clueless. My guess is if Montana stocked the lot with G614 tires on their rigs, they would lose a significant portion of their sales. Look at the number of people who post "I knew the story, but I thought I could get by". When we got our first Montana, it came with Marathons, but they were made in the U.S. The next one came with Carlisle. The first one blew between Goshen and south of Milwaukee while being delivered. We learned about G series tires on that second Montana. #3 left the factory with G614's. We were clueless when we bought our first Montana. Over the years we've learned a ton, thanks to the members here.

farmall130
07-25-2016, 03:47 PM
quote:Originally posted by waynemoore

Well a 2013 rig more likely built in 2012 may have 5 year old tires on it. Plus the transport driver drove well over the 65 mph cap on these tires. Most people don't know these tires should not be run over 65 mph. The very first thing when I bought my rig is tow it 7 miles to a Discount tire dealer and replace the trail King tires with LT tires.

Rig was built in early 2013, these tires look brand new, no cracks, no damage and garaged when it is at home. NO tire built by a "reputable" manufacturer should explode with less than 3000 miles on it, even if it is 3 years old. Now I'm out $500 deductible for repairs and about $1200 for new tires. Goodyear and Keystone should be ashamed for allowing this product to be on their expensive 5th wheels....

hybridhauler
07-25-2016, 04:07 PM
Farmall,

Give the guys at Goodyear property damage claims office a call and file a claim. 1-800-322-4682

waynemoore
07-25-2016, 06:37 PM
Built in early 2013 makes no difference the tires have a date on them and you can be sure that was 2012. Makes them 4 plus to 5 years old. Milage has very little to do with anything. As stated before on the forum a lot of tire dealers will not rotate tires that are 5 years old. The transport driver could and I asure you he did run them well over 65 and low on air you just don't know. The best way to protect your rig from damage is to put descent safe tires on it. I followed the advice the other members on here and only drove 7 miles from the dealer to a Discount Tire Dealer and had new dated LT tires installed. Traded in the new Trail King tires for credit on the new Bridgestone LT Tires. In early 2019 they will be replaced and I don't care how good they look.

Rainer
07-26-2016, 09:22 AM
ST tires should be banned from all of our Montanas. They are dangerous, and in my case have caused thousands of dollars worth of damage to my last two rigs.

The last time I had a problem with my tires was few months after buying my current Monte in 2013. Coming home from Kingman AZ one exploded and fortunately did no damage. But I changed the tire and immediately headed by to Kingman and purchased four LT tires that met my criteria.

Since that day I have not had ONE IOTA of tire problems. And I've driven my rig over 50,000 miles!

Live and learn.

scotchwhiskey
08-01-2016, 04:00 PM
Was just told that my trailer won't pass inspection because tires are dry rotted. We bought the rig 3 years ago and it has the original Missions on it. It is a 2006 2670RL! These are trailer tires but load range E. I'm on my way to find tires now. Thanks for all the info. I think I beat Murphy on this one - learning from you folks rather than from a blowout. Thanks again folks!

TLightning
08-02-2016, 08:37 AM
quote:Originally posted by scotchwhiskey

Was just told that my trailer won't pass inspection because tires are dry rotted. We bought the rig 3 years ago and it has the original Missions on it. It is a 2006 2670RL! These are trailer tires but load range E. I'm on my way to find tires now. Thanks for all the info. I think I beat Murphy on this one - learning from you folks rather than from a blowout. Thanks again folks!


Check the weight of your coach...I put LTs on mine, no problems since then.

dfb
08-07-2016, 01:09 PM
quote:Originally posted by farmall130

Well, one of my Chinese Goodyear Marathons EXPLODED on the way home from the beach today, did considerable damage to the side that I'm hoping my insurance will cover. These tires are parked under a shed always, have less than 2000 miles on them and we had just stopped for a break and none of them felt unusually hot considering it was 94 outside. So you folks are saying even though Goodyear makes the junk supplied on these trailers, the tire to buy is a Goodyear G614? Any other good options? My trailer only weighs about 13,500 lbs.

Same here, Goodyear marathons USA made no troubles. Went back east and 5 blow outs from Goodyear marathons Chinese cheesy made...won't buy another Goodyear...

VernMitchell
08-07-2016, 02:30 PM
I too was concerned with all the warnings I've received about my Trail Kings. So I took my questions to the largest tire chain in Michigan. I asked him if I needed new tires for my Montana. He told me that's there's nothing wrong with these tires as long as you keep them inflated and don't overload 'em. When a reputable tire dealer tells me I don't need to replace my tires, I believe him..

mlh
08-07-2016, 02:49 PM
I don't think you can go wrong with G tires but I'm not sure they are much better than E rated LTs. The Gs are still ST tires with little reserve built and rated for 75 MPH while the LTs have more reserve and are rated for 107 MPH. Big Difference. There is only a little over 10% difference in the weight carrying capacity of the tires and if you go over a little I doubt you will be pulling your camper a 107 MPH and still be within the safety margin of the LT tires.
Lynwood

rohrmann
08-07-2016, 02:56 PM
I hope your dealer is close by when your tires do fail. We did exactly that same thing, kept our Marathons inflated and not overloaded and drove no more than 60 mph, and after the fifth tire failed, no blowouts, just tread separation and large bulges, I decided that no more Chinese tires were going on our rig. We have had USA made G614's for several years, and have not had a single issue since. We have seen way too many rigs with terrible damage from tires failing, and all from Chinese 10 ply ST tires, doesn't matter what brand. They may hold up just fine on lighter rigs, but these Montana's and other large 5th wheel rigs put way too much load on them, even though they may be within the tire rating.

mlh
08-07-2016, 03:20 PM
Vern there has been a lot on people of this forum who thought just like you. I've been here since 2004. Tires are always the hot topic in the summer not just any tires Marathon or any Chinese ST tires. We see so many times people kept their tires inflated properly didn't drive too fast and had a blowout that took the side off their camper. Good luck you will need it. Some day you may won't to find another tire dealer.
Lynwood

jimc100
08-10-2016, 01:58 PM
New to the Montana club and just thought I'd add my two cents. I am new to owning a Montana but I have pulled a Bighorn 3055rl for ten years and have had the usual problems with the tires. I believe the exploding tires (China bombs!)are the result of many factors. First being a poor quality tire that is stressed to the max by load. Secondly speed and lack of education. No one told me that an ST tire was only rated for 65mph and I often abused that. Failure to maintain the tire.
I just purchased our new Montana and got the Goodyear G615 option as a must. The G rated tires are a $1800 retail option and in my opinion with never be included on all Montana trailers unless a "mandatory option" (the cost being passed on to the consumer). The tires are well worth the extra cost.
I ran the Michelin XPS ribbed tires on the Bighorn at 75mph plus and never had a problem so I vote for a quality LT tire if you must stay with the E load rating. The opinion about the ST having a stronger sidewall is correct, however, they can't handle heat and do come apart.
Keystone is doing nothing wrong in using the E load tires, the whole industry is allowed to and does use them there should be better education. I do understand Maxis ties have a good reputation but have no experience with them.