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randye
12-16-2010, 08:50 AM
Holiday Greetings I have a question, since we have been living in our montie since 07 I am unsure of storing the unit. We have an oppertunity to run a moble home park and we will have a managers double wide to live in. They don't even have hook ups for RV's. Storage will be on site and free for staff. My question is how long can you store them without worrying that it will run down? I'm not sure that is the right way to put it. We may be there if it works out for about three years. I don't think there is electricity to plug into, so the Batteries will go bad also. Let me know your opinon, thanks for you input.

Art-n-Marge
12-16-2010, 10:40 AM
Since you'll be in a double wide closeby, you're right that the main thing to worry about are the batteries. Take them out, keep them at your double wide but store them where they can stay dry and away from freezing and where there's some ventilation (I've read that even sealed maintenance-free batteries need ventilation). Put them on a trickle charger every 2-3 months to keep them fresh and check the water level periodically to prevent the cells from drying out. This is what's recommended. There are also Battery Tenders/Minder/Charger/Conditioners that allow you to keep them connected when in storage the whole time but you'll still need to check the water. I have heard some folks have had their batteries for several years this way. Most that don't maintain their batteries or keep them in the rigs unmaintained might not fare as well. I've also read that allowing a battery to completely discharge, then recharge them and doing this repeatedly will shorten the life of the battery.

From my experience I will warn you that this does not prevent a battery from failing at all but it sure helps keep them around and working for a lot longer.

And Happy Holidays to you too, Randye. May your stay at the Mobile Home park be filled with good times and new friends.

racerjoe
12-16-2010, 11:13 AM
I would also drain all of the water weather or not that it freezes where you are. It will get stinky. I would run RV antifreeze thru all of the lines, we also put baking soda in the fridge to absorb moisture,check it a couple times a year. and also some mouse traps/etc. to help keep them under control. Some even put extra air in the tires to help from getting flat spots, and cover them to keep any direct sun off of them.Make sure all of the food is removed no matter how it is sealed,you never know...

Art-n-Marge
12-16-2010, 11:36 AM
Good points to add, racerjoe. If there are no plans to use the Monty at all, some have been known to remove the wheels/tires (and store them properly, flat and wrapped. whatever is proper?) to keep them from the elements, but then this means 4 ton jackstands and blocks of wood at the Monty's frame, but at least your tires will be happier.

Funny though that an RV cover is not as required as one might think because these can be problematic in themselves from wind, weather, rubbing, fitting, wear and eventual replacement because of these issues.

racerjoe
12-16-2010, 11:47 AM
Sorry about the cover, I did mean just the tires. I tried the whole cover ONCE, never again.

randye
12-16-2010, 03:24 PM
Thanks Guys I should have told the area, La Mesa Ca. By San Diego I don't think it freezes their, and We will be taking the Montie on treks on three day weekends and Vacations. Both are great ideas, The Batteries are almost four years old so would need new one in three more years anyway. A cover is not a good idea from what I get from Racejoe could you expound on that a little. Art as far as the tires they are still the Missions and I they would also be seven years old and need replaced, once we decided to go back on the road. Thanks again.

racerjoe
12-17-2010, 01:36 AM
It seemed that no matter how hard I tried to fit the cover, it kept moving and rubbed small tears into it. I protected all the spots that i thought would rip it but as the winter wore on other spots would appear.It was a no win situation. It did not ruin it but made it look pretty shabby. Also when you uncover it you need help. Think about how BIG that cover is!! If you do not fold it up right the next year it is almost impossible to reinstall. You need to get it back up on the roof and start again. This is NOT a one person job. As others have said before,when these units are built they are not covered and when they sit on the lots. I know long term protection is important so that is why a lot of people put up some sort of roof system to keep the harsh sun or snow piles off the roofs. At least that is my thoughts..

CamillaMichael
12-17-2010, 01:55 AM
quote:Originally posted by Art-n-Marge

Since you'll be in a double wide closeby, you're right that the main thing to worry about are the batteries. Take them out, keep them at your double wide but store them where they can stay dry and away from freezing and where there's some ventilation (I've read that even sealed maintenance-free batteries need ventilation). Put them on a trickle charger every 2-3 months to keep them fresh and check the water level periodically to prevent the cells from drying out. This is what's recommended. There are also Battery Tenders/Minder/Charger/Conditioners that allow you to keep them connected when in storage the whole time but you'll still need to check the water. I have heard some folks have had their batteries for several years this way. Most that don't maintain their batteries or keep them in the rigs unmaintained might not fare as well. I've also read that allowing a battery to completely discharge, then recharge them and doing this repeatedly will shorten the life of the battery.

From my experience I will warn you that this does not prevent a battery from failing at all but it sure helps keep them around and working for a lot longer.

And Happy Holidays to you too, Randye. May your stay at the Mobile Home park be filled with good times and new friends.
We have used the Battery Tender for over three years and always enjoy a fully charged battery when we are ready to hit the road. Since we do not currently have power at our storage facility, we need to remove the battery each time we put our Montana in storage...that is the only down side we have discovered.

steves
12-17-2010, 02:15 AM
Thoughts and considerations for extended storage:

Mold and mildew - must keep unit ventilated. Place moisture collecting bags throughout the rig.
Refrig - leave door open to prevent odor build up
Holding tanks - add chemicals to keep odors down
Rodents - need some poison or traps
Tires - may deteriorate. Cover and park on a surface the permits water drainage - Remove as much wight off the tires as possible
Bugs/wasp nest in furnace/refrg/AC components
Exposure - weather and Sun. Covers will work if fitted right. Wax the unit annually. Check roof - clean, repair caulking annually
Slides - occasionally operate slide and keep seals lubricated.
Awning - Open and inspect for mold and nest annually
Water system - drain/winterize/ need to sanitize before using again.
Batteries - remove and/or keep a battery tender on them. Check water regularly.

randye
12-23-2010, 11:15 AM
Since my rig will be on site, can I run my generator each week, and if so how long would be enough to keep the batteries charged? I can also run my dehumidifier for those periods. what say you all knowing ones? Another thing can tarps be used just over the roof and if so will the blues one bleed off onto the white roof and sides?

Mrs. CountryGuy
12-23-2010, 01:59 PM
Tarps must be tied down somehow, and those tie downs will rub against your unit. I vote NO to anything like that.

As far as the frig you can also go this way, clean out and I mean, really clean and REALLY REALLY DRY!! DRY DRY DRY! Then, take crumbled newspapers (I don't use the colorful ads, only the Black and white newsprint) and stuff into the frig and freezer. Then you can close the doors. No mold, no smell when you go to start up the frig in 1 month or 6.

I will repeat tho, that the frig must be EXTREMELY dry inside for this to work.

I use on all coolers, and refers in our possession, Tana and/or stick. Only time I had any issue was when the frig was not DRY !!! before I stuffed the newspaper in there.

Otherwise, this works like a charm. Just another option for you.

JNG3455SA
03-06-2012, 01:25 PM
A newbie to MOC, but heavily used a smaller TT for years. I stored it at my deer camp in Mississippi with full time electric and sewage. Didn't much worry about security as there was someone around most of the time. For long term storage, cleaned the refrigerator and propped open the doors, disconnected water,drained pipes and water heater, RV antifreeze in the pipes, faucets open, radiant oil heater on low, all cabinets left open particularly in the kitchen and bathroom, disconnect and service battery and put it on a trickle charge. The only real problem I had was a dirt dobber nest in the AC unit. Turned it on over a weekend trip in the summer and I thought it was going to shake off the roof. Turned out to be dobber's nest in the fan. Easy to find and fix, but thereafter keep the AC units covered. We get very little snow, but lots of rain and there were many trees. Made a point of visiting at least once a month to sweep or wash the roof. All this said, take the advice already provided in the previous posts and use common sense. In my opinion overkill is better than underkill.