Go Back   Montana Owners Club - Keystone Montana 5th Wheel Forum > GENERAL DISCUSSIONS > TIRES, Montana Tires
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-16-2017, 07:25 PM   #1
mtlakejim
Montana Fan
 
mtlakejim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bee Branch
Posts: 176
M.O.C. #20693
Best choice tires for large Keystone

We just purchased a 2018 High Country HM 381TH. This is a 41', three axle, toy hauler hybrid. I have heard a LOT about "Chinese tires" that come stock from the factory. Having experienced what a blowout can do in the past I am naturally concerned.

While we are not made out of gold, I do spend money where it matters and obviously tires matter, a LOT. Our typical load will include a motorcycle and kayaks in the garage. I generally tend to drive with the flow of traffic pacing with the 18 wheelers on interstates (with a good front cushion). That means that it is not unusual for me to run at about 74mph on open stretches of highway. I generally think it is far safer to go with the flow than drive the speed limit (its the idiots that drive really fast and lane change or the slow pokes blocking traffic that get us all in trouble isn't it?). For certain, I ALWAYS like to have a cushion of safety in the tire rating. That being said I have the following questions:
1. Are the factory tires safe for the for the first year (we typically just camp a couple times a month within a 3 hour drive from the house with an occasional longer trip maybe once per year)? Or should I replace them immediately?
2. What is the best mid priced (as in we don't want the cheapest but don't want to break the bank either) tire brand and what load range/rating should I get to have a good safety "cushion"?
3. Related to above, I hear a lot about ST, LT and such ratings. What is really the best to run on a trailer? Is it a cost thing or what?
mtlakejim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 07:36 PM   #2
mhs4771
Montana Master
 
mhs4771's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sebring
Posts: 2,034
M.O.C. #9969
I guess it depends on what tires your new unit has. If they're Rainier I wouldn't move it off the lot until they were changed. Our Travel friends went through all 5 Rainier tires on their new Jayco a couple of years ago on our Canadian Maritime trip.
A good mid-priced tire that seems to be working good is the Sailun S637, many here on the Forum swear by them.
__________________
Michelle & Ann
2011 Chevy LT 3500HD DRW 4X4 Extended Cab w/Duramax/Allison, Formally 2010 Montana 2955RL, Now Loaded 2016 SOB, Mor/ryde IS, Disc Brakes & Pin Box, Comfort Ride Hitch, GY G114 17.5 Tires.
mhs4771 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 07:45 PM   #3
Lenny K
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 454
M.O.C. #14417
How about telling us what brand and load range you have on it now. Wouldn't be surprised if you had Sailun tires on it already. If so, you are good to go as they have been the tire of choice by most members.
__________________
Lenny and Ros
2012 Montana 3400RL, 680 Watts Solar, 4 x T-105 Trojans, Trimetric 2020, EMSHW50C
2009 Chevy Silverado 3500 LTZ Duramax 4x4 CC Dually, Banks Speed Brake

Lenny K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 08:02 PM   #4
CaptnJohn
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 371
M.O.C. #19865
All I'll add is my 2017 HC arrived with Rainier tires ~~ LR E for crying out loud! I called the tire shop and asked the owner to get me Sailun 235/80/R16 LRG tires, including one for the spare. They are rated at 4080#. He called and said he found them but also found the 235/85 R16 LRG for $10 less each. These are rated at 4400#. The 5er went from the dealer to the tire shop. The owner gave me $30 each for the OEM tires. I had previously contacted the manufacturer of the wheels and confirmed they were rated for 110 PSI. The valve stems are metal as well.
Installed the bill was $875 minus $150 for the OEM so $725 to replace 5. The 235/80/R16 Sailuns are now standard on Montana models.
I considered paying twice as much for the 2nd best ~ GY G614,, for about 3 seconds.
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 08:03 PM   #5
mlh
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Salem
Posts: 3,374
M.O.C. #2283
You need a good G rated tire, Sailum or Goodyear G614s. Either one will work. The Silum is the cheapest. I WOULD NOT go on any long trips with the standard ST tires that most likely came on your camper.
Lynwood
mlh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 08:04 PM   #6
mtlakejim
Montana Fan
 
mtlakejim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bee Branch
Posts: 176
M.O.C. #20693
Understand this is a brand new 2018 that was already on the lot (IE: we didn't order it in from the factory). Came with Rainer ST. ST235/180R load range F.
mtlakejim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 08:07 PM   #7
mtlakejim
Montana Fan
 
mtlakejim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bee Branch
Posts: 176
M.O.C. #20693
And I should mention this is a triple axle....
mtlakejim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2017, 11:01 PM   #8
rohrmann
Montana Master
 
rohrmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Box Elder
Posts: 1,687
M.O.C. #12947
Even the cost of replacing six tires is still far cheaper than the down time and the cost of many thousands of dollars in repairs that will be needed when any of the six blow and destroy your trailer. Many ignore the suggestion to replace their new tires with the good G range tires, then cry when they do have one fail and the side of the trailer is all mangled. It's all about what you are willing to risk and can afford, also known as risk management.
__________________
Bob & Becky
2012 3402RL
2012 Chevy 2500HD D/A CC 4WD
rohrmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2017, 02:04 PM   #9
mtlakejim
Montana Fan
 
mtlakejim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bee Branch
Posts: 176
M.O.C. #20693
Rohrmann,


Having seen what a blowout can do and just generally preferring everything I have to be overbuilt leads me to lean toward replacing the tires. I did on the last camper I bought (used) even though I had a blowout before I got the chance to get it to the tire shop.


That is why I am on here asking the questions to see how the factory tires fair and determine what to go to that will give me plenty of excess rating.


Fortunately I have a flatbed trailer that can take the factory tires so I won't lose a lot of money. If I had ordered the trailer from the factory instead of taking the one on the lot, I would have asked about the tires and got better ones to reduce the hassle.


Thanks for all the responses so far.
mtlakejim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 10:32 AM   #10
beeje
Montana Fan
 
beeje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: westminster
Posts: 247
M.O.C. #17894
I don't care what brand tires they are. IF THEY ARE ST TIRES, GET THEM OFF ASAP. Just got back from the Talladega race and on the way home saw probably a dozen or more trailers on the roadside with blown tires.
beeje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 02:04 PM   #11
twindman
Montana Master
 
twindman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Mesa
Posts: 979
M.O.C. #5651
I wonder if lesser tires wouldn't work here. Axle weight is about 4400 per axle. That is only 2200 per tire - way under any tire you would put on these units.
Just a thought......
__________________

Tom and Gail
2013 Mountaineer 362
2012 Silverado 2500
twindman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 02:08 PM   #12
CaptnJohn
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 371
M.O.C. #19865
Quote:
Originally Posted by beeje View Post
I don't care what brand tires they are. IF THEY ARE ST TIRES, GET THEM OFF ASAP. Just got back from the Talladega race and on the way home saw probably a dozen or more trailers on the roadside with blown tires.
I'll keep my Sailun 235/85r16 ST tires made in China on my 5er before any LT tire plus $1000.
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 05:35 PM   #13
masterdrago
Seasoned Camper
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Willis
Posts: 62
M.O.C. #20587
Most here are saying stay away from the ST tires. Why? Also folks are saying the Sailun S637 is a good tire but both the 235/80R16 G load index 129/125L 14 ply max 4,080# @110psi *AND* the 235/85R16 G load index 132/127L 14 ply max 4,400# @110psi are ST tires. http://www.sailuntires.ca/MRT/S637.html
I'm considering looking at the Sailun S637 235/75R17.5 load index 143/141L 16 ply max 6,005# @125psi. With new rims total $$ will be ~$2,000.
masterdrago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 07:05 PM   #14
CaptnJohn
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 371
M.O.C. #19865
Quote:
Originally Posted by masterdrago View Post
Most here are saying stay away from the ST tires. Why? Also folks are saying the Sailun S637 is a good tire but both the 235/80R16 G load index 129/125L 14 ply max 4,080# @110psi *AND* the 235/85R16 G load index 132/127L 14 ply max 4,400# @110psi are ST tires. http://www.sailuntires.ca/MRT/S637.html
I'm considering looking at the Sailun S637 235/75R17.5 load index 143/141L 16 ply max 6,005# @125psi. With new rims total $$ will be ~$2,000.
WoW!! I thought my 5er ready to snowbird at just under 14,000# (gvwr 15,200) with Sailun 235/85R16 was overkill at 4400 ~~ not sure what I'd pull to think of 6005# rated. I'm not sure there is enough height in the wheel wells or between tires either.


Most that beat the LT drum had a blowout or know someone that did on ST tires. Most of those tires were barely adequate when installed at the factory. Some were not properly cared for or run on low psi. Some had nearly aged out when the RV was purchased. All were the cheapest the builder could find. So, they run to LT tires. The only blowout I ever had was on a nearly new Good Year LT tire but I've only been driving 53 years.
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 07:06 PM   #15
beeje
Montana Fan
 
beeje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: westminster
Posts: 247
M.O.C. #17894
Captnjohn and others, What I meant was get the junk factory supplied ST tires off. Power king/arket/tow master/carlile/ and others.

I installed 5 new sailuns this spring and the difference is astounding. The sailuns used to be marked as an LT tire but for what I have read, they have been rebadged as an ST, but still the same tire.

Sorry for any confusion.
beeje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 07:52 PM   #16
Beau2010
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Sedona
Posts: 115
M.O.C. #18355
Our Sailuns are two+ years old and marked as LTs but say "for trailer use only". Maybe something lost in translation. In any event, stay away from light truck tires on a double/triple axle trailer. They will not tolerate the sideways sliding when trailer is in a tight turn.
Beau2010 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 09:20 PM   #17
mtlakejim
Montana Fan
 
mtlakejim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bee Branch
Posts: 176
M.O.C. #20693
We have a first rate local tire/mechanic shop so I will ultimately defer to him. I trust the guy with my life. But I will also be getting a tire minder!
mtlakejim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 09:28 PM   #18
masterdrago
Seasoned Camper
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Willis
Posts: 62
M.O.C. #20587
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptnJohn View Post
WoW!! I thought my 5er ready to snowbird at just under 14,000# (gvwr 15,200) with Sailun 235/85R16 was overkill at 4400 ~~ not sure what I'd pull to think of 6005# rated. I'm not sure there is enough height in the wheel wells or between tires either.
When one considers the physical forces on a tire during bumps, potholes, and high speed thrill rides on our wonderful highways then the loading is much different than smooth sailing on flat concrete. Some other genius can do the physics. I agree that 4,400#/tire max load is ~900# margin/tire on most 5r we are looking at (3791RD GVWR 16,945-pin(2,945)=14,000/4=3,500 carried per tire).

Also consider that the S637 Sailun ST235/85R16 is 31.7" OD and the 235/75R17.5 is 31.6"OD, they are essentially the same size. Rim width is only 1/4" difference and and SW only 4/10" difference. Clearance would not be an issue.
masterdrago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2017, 10:05 PM   #19
CaptnJohn
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 371
M.O.C. #19865
Quote:
Originally Posted by masterdrago View Post
When one considers the physical forces on a tire during bumps, potholes, and high speed thrill rides on our wonderful highways then the loading is much different than smooth sailing on flat concrete. Some other genius can do the physics. I agree that 4,400# max load is ~ 1,150# margin/tire on most 5r we are looking at (3791RD GVWR 16,945-pin(2,945)=13,000/4=3,250 carried per tire).

Also consider that the S637 Sailun ST235/85R16 is 31.7" OD and the 235/75R17.5 is 31.6"OD, they are essentially the same size. Rim width is only 1/4" difference and and SW only 4/10" difference. Clearance would not be an issue.
One thing I notice with LR G at 110# psi over LR E at 80# psi is a little stiffer ride in the 5er. Not huge, but some things left on the counter now moves a little. Going to an even stronger sidewall would give even more bounce inside, more than I'd like possibly.
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2017, 05:43 AM   #20
beeje
Montana Fan
 
beeje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: westminster
Posts: 247
M.O.C. #17894
Not true about using LT tires on a trailer. They are fine on something a little lighter. I put firestone transforce on my Raptor 300mp dual axle trailer after having several sets of ST tires with problems. Never had another issue after I installed them. FYI both axles weighted in around 12k loaded. The tires are rated at 3042lbs ea.
beeje is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.