Go Back   Montana Owners Club - Keystone Montana 5th Wheel Forum > HAVE MOC WILL TRAVEL > Navigation
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-03-2007, 07:00 AM   #1
garyka
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tonawanda
Posts: 544
M.O.C. #3662
Mountains

I'm leaving buffalo NY in about 10 days to snowbird for the next few month's,my concern is traveling through the mountains.I see some of the grades are up to 7 degrees for several miles.On disc brakes it is recommented to keep steady pressure on brakes but on shoe brakes it's recommended not to keep steady pressure for heat reasons?The tow vehicle has disc and the monty has shoes.I'll be in Arizona also, same problem different mountains.I have 35 ft monty(3295)and a 1-ton duramax dually.
Any pointers or help would be appreciated
ps: First trip.
garyka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 07:36 AM   #2
bsmeaton
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lone Tree
Posts: 5,615
M.O.C. #6109
Gary,

I've traveled through the Rocky Mountains plenty and have found what is comfortable for me - I rely heavily on the transmission to do the work. I brake only when required to bring down the RPM and once I start braking I'll back it way down, then let off the brake and let the transmission do it's thing again. I end up cycling between moderately heavy brake pressure and no brake pressure.

I personally believe any steady pressure will create uneccessary heat on both disc and drum brakes. This unecessary heat causes glazing and fading, and will actually warp disc brake rotors which is a miserable after effect and a costly repair. I prefer to let the brakes cool between braking.
bsmeaton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 07:43 AM   #3
firetrucker
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Gardnerville
Posts: 748
M.O.C. #2165
I hope you don't run into any 7 degree grades...that turns out to be 12%. But aside from that, I don't think either disc brakes or drum brakes should be subjected to steady pressure. So much heat is generated that the brake fluid can boil, leaving you wihtout any brakes at all. That's in addition to any thermal effects, which include expansion, warping, and glazing, that affect both discs and drums, which reduce braking capability.

Most authorities recommend using the brakes to reduce your speed to about five mph below your maximum speed and then releasing the brakes, allowing them to cool as your speed comes up again. To help reduce the need for braking, use a lower gear, the tow/haul setting on your transmission, or an engine (compression) or exhaust brake.

Bottom line, though, no matter what type of brake system you have, is don't ride the brakes.

Bob
firetrucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 08:09 AM   #4
lawrenceb42106
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Hartselle
Posts: 977
M.O.C. #45
We have the same setup as you do until I traded trailers. If you you will use the tow/haul mode on your truck it will take care of most mountains. I use the brakes very little in the mountains. Right now we have the original brakes on our truck (125,000 miles).Have been in every state but 2 so far. I love the Allison trans, it does good. Just do you regular maintenance and it will last for you.
lawrenceb42106 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 08:21 AM   #5
jrgwdenner
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Wetumpka
Posts: 4,936
M.O.C. #1105
Your one ton will handle the mountains just fine. We pulled our 37 footer to Alaska and back without problems. The guys have given you great advice. The steepest slope we went up was in rural Tennessee.
jrgwdenner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 01:12 PM   #6
ols1932
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cedar Rapids
Posts: 4,876
M.O.C. #1944
With your Duramax/Allison Tow/Haul mode, you won't have any problems. Let the transmission do the work going down hill. As for up hill, that Duramax will do the job. Methinks you are overly concerned. I have a '95 Ford F-250 with Banks Power Pack and I don't feel that I have near the truck you have and I don't have a problem either up or down hill.

Orv
ols1932 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 02:16 PM   #7
noneck
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wappingers Falls
Posts: 1,303
M.O.C. #6263
Send a message via AIM to noneck
I agree with all that has been said. One small adder, as your climbing the grade you should stay alert to cresting the hill and acknowledge the backside may be a steep (usually posted) grade, do not allow yourself to crank up the speed as the climb subsides but hold back to something like 55 mph. I say this because I have lost my head and crested the hill with this big bad Turbo Diesel cranking 60 - 65 mph...(I know not an intelligent thing) and found when I hit the breaks, because now were running on downside closing on 70mph!!, there's a huge mph reduction needed to get back down to tranny drag mode...well, have seen my tach suddenly jump towards the 4k rpm mark, causing me to poke the tow/haul mode "OFF" to release that mode, recovers the rpm to prevent floating my valves, crashing them into the pistons..., and use brakes to recover speed, then at 50mph or less tow/haul back on and a bit-o-relief, short prayer, mummbling to myself (mentally calling myself an idiot) how could I let this happen we are not in a race...and no need to touch brakes for rest of 3 - 4 mile grade as tranny/diesel drag contain my speed no problem.
Lesson learned...why be in a hurry aren't we supposed to enjoy the journey?! Darn Yankee's ... always in a hurry...no patience...
Chuck
noneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 02:28 PM   #8
Cat320
Montana Master
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location:
Posts: 1,439
M.O.C. #5751
Quote:
quote:Originally posted by ols1932

With your Duramax/Allison Tow/Haul mode, you won't have any problems. Let the transmission do the work going down hill. As for up hill, that Duramax will do the job. Methinks you are overly concerned. I have a '95 Ford F-250 with Banks Power Pack and I don't feel that I have near the truck you have and I don't have a problem either up or down hill.

Orv
Exactly.

Put it in Tow/Haul and the Duramax/Allison will take care of your braking problems for you.
Cat320 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 03:37 PM   #9
Montana Sky
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Down the Road
Posts: 5,627
M.O.C. #889
The trick is to start out slow once you crest the summit. I use 2nd gear and my Duramax will usually hold 25-35mph with very little brake required. Been up and over the 10,000' level coming down grades of 8% to 10%, no problems.
Montana Sky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 05:49 PM   #10
richfaa
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: North Ridgeville
Posts: 19,180
M.O.C. #2839
We just drove down from near Cleveland, Ohio, Ohio, Ind, Ill, Mo, OK, TX NM, Az..no problem.. tow haul mode will handle the braking..up hill..no problem.. Set the cruse, punch the tow haul and hang on.
richfaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2007, 04:57 AM   #11
rrheik
Montana Fan
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: morgans point
Posts: 403
M.O.C. #6292
We spent the summer in the Rockies, and as said before, we just used tow/haul mode, and taped the brakes one in awhile, and let the allison tranny take over. We had some 9%, lots of 5, 6, and 7 pecent, and never had a problem. The Tana towed just fine, and we enjoyed the mountain views. That was my first experience towing in the mountains, and I was very apprehensive on the first lon 5 mile down slope, but after seeing whata great job the truck did, we never thought much about the steep grades again. Relax, enjoy, and have a safe trip.

bob
rrheik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2007, 02:35 AM   #12
garyka
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tonawanda
Posts: 544
M.O.C. #3662
Thanks a lot for reasuring me about mountains,you put me at ease about this on my first journey.When reading your advice you say to put the tv in tow/haul mode.I was planning to always have this on when towing,am I correct in doing this?
Again thanks alot for the many questions you have answerd on this forum for me to put me at ease.You guys(girls) are a great.
garyka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2007, 04:37 AM   #13
bsmeaton
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lone Tree
Posts: 5,615
M.O.C. #6109
Gary,

As you say, I just leave mine in tow/haul whenever the Monty is on the back.

The only exception is I'll turn it off when cruising into a rest stop or other low speed area, just because that downshift into first gear in the tow/haul mode is pretty rough and sneaks up on me.

Brad
bsmeaton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2007, 06:14 PM   #14
sreigle
Montana Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Oceanside
Posts: 20,028
M.O.C. #20
I've towed I-70 through Colorado with a 2003 3295RK in tow with no problem. I also did it with a Ford V10. Again, no problem. I don't think you want to be riding the brakes, though. That will heat them quickly, even discs. Use the tow/haul or lower gears, lower speed, and use brakes only when needed.
sreigle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Adirondack Mountains MIMF Campgrounds State, Provincial & Federal 2 03-19-2014 07:40 AM
What Mountains stiles watson Tow Vehicles & Towing 8 11-14-2011 11:58 AM
No Mountains hookman Sitting around the Campfire 0 05-29-2009 04:30 PM
Back in the Ga. Mountains rvfirefighter Who, Where & When? 1 11-28-2006 04:11 AM
TOWING IN THE MOUNTAINS CanDo Tow Vehicles & Towing 9 07-29-2006 07:18 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Montana RV, Keystone RV Company or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.